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A 15-month evaluation of the effects of repeated subgingival minocycline in chronic adult periodontitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201582
Source
J Periodontol. 1999 Jun;70(6):657-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
D. van Steenberghe
B. Rosling
P O Söder
R G Landry
U. van der Velden
M F Timmerman
E F McCarthy
G. Vandenhoven
C. Wouters
M. Wilson
J. Matthews
H N Newman
Author Affiliation
Catholic University, Leuven, Belgium.
Source
J Periodontol. 1999 Jun;70(6):657-67
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans - drug effects
Analysis of Variance
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Campylobacter - drug effects
Canada
Chronic Disease
Colony Count, Microbial
Dental Plaque Index
Dental Scaling
Double-Blind Method
Eikenella corrodens - drug effects
Europe
Female
Fusobacterium nucleatum - drug effects
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Minocycline - administration & dosage
Ointments
Periodontal Index
Periodontal Pocket - drug therapy - microbiology
Periodontitis - drug therapy - microbiology
Porphyromonas gingivalis - drug effects
Prevotella intermedia - drug effects
Statistics, nonparametric
Treatment Outcome
Treponema - drug effects
Abstract
A double-blind, randomized, parallel, comparative study was designed to evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of subgingivally administered minocycline ointment versus a vehicle control.
One hundred four patients (104) with moderate to severe adult periodontitis (34 to 64 years of age; mean 46 years) were enrolled in the study. Following scaling and root planing, patients were randomized to receive either 2% minocycline ointment or a matched vehicle control. Study medication was administered directly into the periodontal pocket with a specially designed, graduated, disposable applicator at baseline; week 2; and at months 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12. Scaling and root planing was repeated at months 6 and 12. Standard clinical variables (including probing depth and attachment level) were evaluated at baseline and at months 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15. Microbiological sampling using DNA probes was done at baseline; at week 2; and at months 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15.
Both treatment groups showed significant and clinically relevant reductions in the numbers of each of the 7 microorganisms measured during the entire 15-month study period. When differences were detected, sites treated with minocycline ointment always produced statistically significantly greater reductions than sites which received the vehicle control. For initial pockets > or =5 mm, a mean reduction in probing depth of 1.9 mm was seen in the test sites, versus 1.2 mm in the control sites. Sites with a baseline probing depth > or =7 mm and bleeding index >2 showed an average of 2.5 mm reduction with minocycline versus 1.5 mm with the vehicle. Gains in attachment (0.9 mm and 1.1 mm) were observed in minocycline-treated sites, with baseline probing depth > or =5 mm and > or =7 mm, respectively, compared with 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm gain at control sites. Subgingival administration of minocycline ointment was well tolerated.
Overall, the results demonstrate that repeated subgingival administration of minocycline ointment in the treatment of adult periodontitis is safe and leads to significant adjunctive improvement after subgingival instrumentation in both clinical and microbiologic variables over a 15-month period.
PubMed ID
10397521 View in PubMed
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Abuse of barbiturates in an alcoholic population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature109029
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1971 Feb 6;104(3):219-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-6-1971

Access to palliative care services in hospital: a matter of being in the right hospital. Hospital charts study in a Canadian city.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133654
Source
Palliat Med. 2012 Jan;26(1):89-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Joachim Cohen
Donna M Wilson
Amy Thurston
Rod MacLeod
Luc Deliens
Author Affiliation
Ghent University & Vrije Universiteit Brussel, End-of-Life Care Research Group, Brussels, Belgium. jcohen@vub.ac.be
Source
Palliat Med. 2012 Jan;26(1):89-94
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Health Services Accessibility - standards
Health Services Research
Hospital Planning
Hospitals, Urban - organization & administration
Humans
Infant
Male
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Palliative Care - organization & administration - standards
Referral and Consultation - standards
Young Adult
Abstract
Access to palliative care (PC) is a major need worldwide. Using hospital charts of all patients who died over one year (April 2008-March 2009) in two mid-sized hospitals of a large Canadian city, similar in size and function and operated by the same administrative group, this study examined which patients who could benefit from PC services actually received these services and which ones did not, and compared their care characteristics. A significantly lower proportion (29%) of patients dying in hospital 2 (without a PC unit and reliant on a visiting PC team) was referred to PC services as compared to in hospital 1 (with a PC unit; 68%). This lower referral likelihood was found for all patient groups, even among cancer patients, and remained after controlling for patient mix. Referral was strongly associated with having cancer and younger age. Referral to PC thus seems to depend, at least in part, on the coincidence of being admitted to the right hospital. This finding suggests that establishing PC units or a team of committed PC providers in every hospital could increase referral rates and equity of access to PC services. The relatively lower access for older and non-cancer patients and technology use in hospital PC services require further attention.
PubMed ID
21680750 View in PubMed
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Addressing myths about end-of-life care: research into the use of acute care hospitals over the last five years of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190268
Source
J Palliat Care. 2002;18(1):29-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Donna M Wilson
Corrine D Truman
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
J Palliat Care. 2002;18(1):29-38
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta
Attitude to Death
Attitude to Health
Female
Health Services Research
Hospital Bed Capacity - statistics & numerical data
Hospital Costs - statistics & numerical data - trends
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Terminal Care - statistics & numerical data - trends - utilization
Abstract
Despite very little confirming evidence, one of the most pervasive beliefs about dying is that terminally ill people receive a great deal of health care in the last few days, weeks, or months of life. A secondary analysis of 1992/93 through 1996/97 Alberta inpatient hospital abstracts data was undertaken to explore and describe hospital use over the five years before death by all Albertans who died in acute care hospital beds during the 1996/97 year (n = 7,429). There were four key findings: (1) hospital use varied, but was most often low, (2) the last hospital stay was infrequently resource intensive, (3) age, gender, and illness did not distinguish use, and (4) most ultra-high users were rural residents, with the majority of care episodes taking place in small, rural hospitals.
PubMed ID
12001400 View in PubMed
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Administrative decision making in response to sudden health care agency funding reductions: is there a role for ethics?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204203
Source
Nurs Ethics. 1998 Jul;5(4):319-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1998
Author
D M Wilson
Source
Nurs Ethics. 1998 Jul;5(4):319-29
Date
Jul-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Cost Control
Decision Making, Organizational
Ethics, Institutional
Financing, Government - organization & administration
Health Facility Administrators - psychology
Humans
Questionnaires
Resource Allocation
Abstract
In October 1993, a survey of health care agency administrators was undertaken shortly after they had experienced two sudden reductions in public funding. The purpose of this investigation was to gain insight into the role of ethics in health administrator decision making. A mail questionnaire was designed for this purpose. Descriptive statistics and content analysis were used to summarize the data. Staff reductions and bed closures were the two most frequently reported mechanisms for addressing the funding reductions. Most administrators did not believe that these changes would have a negative public impact. In contrast, the majority indicated that future changes in reaction to additional funding reductions would have a negative public impact. Approximately one-third of the administrators reported ethics to be an element of recent administrative decision making, and one-half could foresee that ethics would be important in the future if reductions continued. These findings are discussed in relation to ethics. Issues for additional research are outlined.
PubMed ID
9782919 View in PubMed
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Alcohol influence on acrylamide to glycidamide metabolism assessed with hemoglobin-adducts and questionnaire data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98517
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2010 Mar;48(3):820-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Anna C Vikström
Kathryn M Wilson
Birgit Paulsson
Ioannis Athanassiadis
Henrik Grönberg
Hans-Olov Adami
Jan Adolfsson
Lorelei A Mucci
Katarina Bälter
Margareta Törnqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. anna.vikstrom@mk.su.se
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2010 Mar;48(3):820-4
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamides - metabolism
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - metabolism
Case-Control Studies
Central Nervous System Depressants - pharmacology
Epoxy Compounds - metabolism
Ethanol - pharmacology
Food Habits
Hemoglobins - metabolism
Humans
Male
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Our purpose was to investigate whether alcohol (ethanol) consumption could have an influence on the metabolism of acrylamide to glycidamide in humans exposed to acrylamide through food. We studied a subsample from a population-based case-control study of prostate cancer in Sweden (CAPS). Questionnaire data for alcohol intake estimates was compared to the ratio of hemoglobin-adduct levels for acrylamide and glycidamide, used as a measure of individual differences in metabolism. Data from 161 non-smoking men were processed with regard to the influence of alcohol on the metabolism of acrylamide to glycidamide. A negative, linear trend of glycidamide-adduct to acrylamide-adduct-level ratios with increasing alcohol intake was observed and the strongest association (p-value for trend=0.02) was obtained in the group of men with the lowest adduct levels (47 pmol/g globin) when alcohol intake was stratified by acrylamide-adduct levels. The observed trend is likely due to a competitive effect between ethanol and acrylamide as both are substrates for cytochrome P450 2E1. Our results, strongly indicating that ethanol influence metabolism of acrylamide to glycidamide, partly explain earlier observations of only low to moderate associations between questionnaire data on dietary acrylamide intake and hemoglobin-adduct levels.
PubMed ID
20034532 View in PubMed
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Antigen-based therapy with glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) vaccine in patients with recent-onset type 1 diabetes: a randomised double-blind trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133331
Source
Lancet. 2011 Jul 23;378(9788):319-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-23-2011
Author
Diane K Wherrett
Brian Bundy
Dorothy J Becker
Linda A DiMeglio
Stephen E Gitelman
Robin Goland
Peter A Gottlieb
Carla J Greenbaum
Kevan C Herold
Jennifer B Marks
Roshanak Monzavi
Antoinette Moran
Tihamer Orban
Jerry P Palmer
Philip Raskin
Henry Rodriguez
Desmond Schatz
Darrell M Wilson
Jeffrey P Krischer
Jay S Skyler
Author Affiliation
Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Lancet. 2011 Jul 23;378(9788):319-27
Date
Jul-23-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antigens - immunology - therapeutic use
Autoimmune Diseases - immunology - therapy
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - immunology - therapy
Double-Blind Method
Female
Glutamate Decarboxylase - immunology - therapeutic use
Humans
Immunotherapy, Active
Male
Middle Aged
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) is a major target of the autoimmune response that occurs in type 1 diabetes mellitus. In animal models of autoimmunity, treatment with a target antigen can modulate aggressive autoimmunity. We aimed to assess whether immunisation with GAD formulated with aluminum hydroxide (GAD-alum) would preserve insulin production in recent-onset type 1 diabetes.
Patients aged 3-45 years who had been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes for less than 100 days were enrolled from 15 sites in the USA and Canada, and randomly assigned to receive one of three treatments: three injections of 20 µg GAD-alum, two injections of 20 µg GAD-alum and one of alum, or 3 injections of alum. Injections were given subcutaneously at baseline, 4 weeks later, and 8 weeks after the second injection. The randomisation sequence was computer generated at the TrialNet coordinating centre. Patients and study personnel were masked to treatment assignment. The primary outcome was the baseline-adjusted geometric mean area under the curve (AUC) of serum C-peptide during the first 2 h of a 4-h mixed meal tolerance test at 1 year. Secondary outcomes included changes in glycated haemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) and insulin dose, and safety. Analysis included all randomised patients with known measurements. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00529399.
145 patients were enrolled and treated with GAD-alum (n=48), GAD-alum plus alum (n=49), or alum (n=48). At 1 year, the 2-h AUC of C-peptide, adjusted for age, sex, and baseline C-peptide value, was 0
412 nmol/L (95% CI 0
349-0
478) in the GAD-alum group, 0
382 nmol/L (0
322-0
446) in the GAD-alum plus alum group, and 0
413 nmol/L (0
351-0
477) in the alum group. The ratio of the population mean of the adjusted geometric mean 2-h AUC of C-peptide was 0
998 (95% CI 0
779-1
22; p=0
98) for GAD-alum versus alum, and 0
926 (0
720-1
13; p=0
50) for GAD-alum plus alum versus alum. HbA(1c), insulin use, and the occurrence and severity of adverse events did not differ between groups.
Antigen-based immunotherapy therapy with two or three doses of subcutaneous GAD-alum across 4-12 weeks does not alter the course of loss of insulin secretion during 1 year in patients with recently diagnosed type 1 diabetes. Although antigen-based therapy is a highly desirable treatment and is effective in animal models, translation to human autoimmune disease remains a challenge.
US National Institutes of Health.
Notes
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Comment In: Lancet. 2011 Jul 23;378(9788):291-221715000
PubMed ID
21714999 View in PubMed
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La Belle Mort en Milieu Rural: a report of an ethnographic study of the good death for Quebec rural francophones.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139573
Source
J Palliat Care. 2010;26(3):159-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Anne-Marie Veillette
Lise Fillion
Donna M Wilson
Roger Thomas
Serge Dumont
Author Affiliation
Centre de recherche de l'Hôtel-Dieu de Québec, 9 McMahon Street, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada G1R 2J6. anne-marie.veillette@crhdq.chuq.qc.ca
Source
J Palliat Care. 2010;26(3):159-66
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anthropology, Cultural
Attitude to Death - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cultural Competency
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, organizational
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Methodology Research
Qualitative Research
Quebec
Questionnaires
Rural health services - organization & administration
Terminal Care - organization & administration - psychology
Abstract
An ethnographic study was undertaken in two rural areas of Quebec to conceptualize the good death. The findings reveal that a good quality of life for the dying person and his or her family and friends is essential for a good death. The resulting conceptual model emphasized four dimensions: physical, spiritual, social, and emotiona/psychological. These dimensions were determined to be similar to those discovered through a previous urban study, indicating that there may be considerable overlap between good deaths in rural and urban areas. Some findings of this Quebec French-language rural study were similar to those of an Alberta English-language rural study, indicating that rural people may have some common needs and interests with regard to the good death. As such, there could be some common elements of the good death that transcend culture or ethnicity. Chief among these is the desire of rural people to die at home or in their home communities.
PubMed ID
21047038 View in PubMed
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Body fat distribution on computed tomography imaging and prostate cancer risk and mortality in the AGES-Reykjavik study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300879
Source
Cancer. 2019 Aug 15; 125(16):2877-2885
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-15-2019
Author
Barbra A Dickerman
Johanna E Torfadottir
Unnur A Valdimarsdottir
Edward Giovannucci
Kathryn M Wilson
Thor Aspelund
Laufey Tryggvadottir
Lara G Sigurdardottir
Tamara B Harris
Lenore J Launer
Vilmundur Gudnason
Sarah C Markt
Lorelei A Mucci
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
Source
Cancer. 2019 Aug 15; 125(16):2877-2885
Date
Aug-15-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The World Cancer Research Fund classifies as "strong evidence" the link between obesity and the risk of advanced prostate cancer. In light of the different hormonal profiles associated with where adipose is stored, this study investigated the role of objectively measured body fat distribution and the risk of clinically relevant prostate cancer.
This was a prospective study of 1832 men in the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik study. From 2002 to 2006, participants underwent baseline computed tomography imaging of fat deposition, bioelectric impedance analysis, and measurement of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference. Men were followed through linkage with nationwide cancer registries for the incidence of total (n = 172), high-grade (Gleason grade =8; n = 43), advanced (=cT3b/N1/M1 at diagnosis or fatal prostate cancer over follow-up; n = 41), and fatal prostate cancer (n = 31) through 2015. Cox regression was used to evaluate the association between adiposity measures and prostate cancer outcomes.
Among all men, visceral fat (hazard ratio [HR], 1.31 per 1-standard deviation [SD] increase; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00-1.72) and thigh subcutaneous fat (HR, 1.37 per 1-SD increase; 95% CI, 1.00-1.88) were associated with risk of advanced and fatal disease, respectively. Among men who were leaner based on BMI, visceral fat was associated with both advanced and fatal disease. BMI and waist circumference were associated with a higher risk of advanced and fatal disease. No adiposity measures were associated with total or high-grade disease.
Specific fat depots as well as BMI and waist circumference were associated with the risk of aggressive prostate cancer, which may help to elucidate underlying mechanisms and target intervention strategies.
PubMed ID
31179538 View in PubMed
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Body-related state shame and guilt in women: do causal attributions mediate the influence of physical self-concept and shame and guilt proneness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107259
Source
Body Image. 2014 Jan;11(1):19-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Peter R E Crocker
Sara M Brune
Kent C Kowalski
Diane E Mack
Philip M Wilson
Catherine M Sabiston
Author Affiliation
School of Kinesiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. Electronic address: peter.crocker@ubc.ca.
Source
Body Image. 2014 Jan;11(1):19-26
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Image - psychology
Canada
Emotions - physiology
Female
Guilt
Humans
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Shame
Students - psychology
Women - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Guided by the process model of self-conscious emotions, this study examined whether physical self-concept (PSC) and shame and guilt proneness were associated with body-related self-conscious emotions of state shame and guilt and if these relationships were mediated by attributions of stability, globality, and controllability. Female participants (N=284; Mean age=20.6±1.9 years) completed measures of PSC and shame and guilt proneness before reading a hypothetical scenario. Participants completed measures of attributions and state shame and guilt in response to the scenario. Significant relationships were noted between state shame and attributions of globality and controllability, and shame proneness, guilt proneness, and PSC. Similar relationships, with the additional predictor of stability, were found for state guilt. Mediation analysis partially supported the process model hypotheses for shame. Results indicate PSC and shame proneness are important in predicting body-related emotions, but the role of specific attributions are still unclear.
PubMed ID
24035310 View in PubMed
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77 records – page 1 of 8.