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1,3-Butadiene: exposure estimation, hazard characterization, and exposure-response analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186649
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health B Crit Rev. 2003 Jan-Feb;6(1):55-83
Publication Type
Article
Author
K. Hughes
M E Meek
M. Walker
R. Beauchamp
Author Affiliation
Existing Substances Division, Environmental Health Directorate, Health Canada, Environmental Health Centre, Tunney's Pasture PL0802B1, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0L2.
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health B Crit Rev. 2003 Jan-Feb;6(1):55-83
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Butadienes - metabolism - toxicity
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinogens, Environmental - toxicity
Environmental Exposure
Hazardous Substances - toxicity
Humans
Mutagens - toxicity
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Abstract
1,3-Butadiene has been assessed as a Priority Substance under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act. The general population in Canada is exposed to 1,3-butadiene primarily through ambient air. Inhaled 1,3-butadiene is carcinogenic in both mice and rats, inducing tumors at multiple sites at all concentrations tested in all identified studies. In addition, 1,3-butadiene is genotoxic in both somatic and germ cells of rodents. It also induces adverse effects in the reproductive organs of female mice at relatively low concentrations. The greater sensitivity in mice than in rats to induction of these effects by 1,3-butadiene is likely related to species differences in metabolism to active epoxide metabolites. Exposure to 1,3-butadiene in the occupational environment has been associated with the induction of leukemia; there is also some limited evidence that 1,3-butadiene is genotoxic in exposed workers. Therefore, in view of the weight of evidence of available epidemiological and toxicological data, 1,3-butadiene is considered highly likely to be carcinogenic, and likely to be genotoxic, in humans. Estimates of the potency of butadiene to induce cancer have been derived on the basis of both epidemiological investigation and bioassays in mice and rats. Potencies to induce ovarian effects have been estimated on the basis of studies in mice. Uncertainties have been delineated, and, while there are clear species differences in metabolism, estimates of potency to induce effects are considered justifiably conservative in view of the likely variability in metabolism across the population related to genetic polymorphism for enzymes for the critical metabolic pathway.
PubMed ID
12587254 View in PubMed
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2008 Niday Perinatal Database quality audit: report of a quality assurance project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128969
Source
Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2011 Dec;32(1):32-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
S. Dunn
J. Bottomley
A. Ali
M. Walker
Author Affiliation
Better Outcomes Registry and Network (BORN Ontario), Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. sadunn@ohri.ca
Source
Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2011 Dec;32(1):32-42
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Data Collection - standards
Databases, Factual - standards
Humans
Medical Records
Perinatal care
Quality Control
Abstract
This quality assurance project was designed to determine the reliability, completeness and comprehensiveness of the data entered into Niday Perinatal Database.
Quality of the data was measured by comparing data re-abstracted from the patient record to the original data entered into the Niday Perinatal Database. A representative sample of hospitals in Ontario was selected and a random sample of 100 linked mother and newborn charts were audited for each site. A subset of 33 variables (representing 96 data fields) from the Niday dataset was chosen for re-abstraction.
Of the data fields for which Cohen's kappa statistic or intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated, 44% showed substantial or almost perfect agreement (beyond chance). However, about 17% showed less than 95% agreement and a kappa or ICC value of less than 60% indicating only slight, fair or moderate agreement (beyond chance).
Recommendations to improve the quality of these data fields are presented.
PubMed ID
22153174 View in PubMed
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Analysis of the type 2 diabetes-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms in the genes IRS1, KCNJ11, and PPARG2 in type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181346
Source
Diabetes. 2004 Mar;53(3):870-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Christina Eftychi
Joanna M M Howson
Bryan J Barratt
Adrian Vella
Felicity Payne
Deborah J Smyth
Rebecca C J Twells
Neil M Walker
Helen E Rance
Eva Tuomilehto-Wolf
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Dag E Undlien
Kjersti S Rønningen
Cristian Guja
Constantin Ionescu-Tîirgoviste
David A Savage
John A Todd
Author Affiliation
Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation/Wellcome Trust Diabetes and Inflammation Laboratory, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, U.K.
Source
Diabetes. 2004 Mar;53(3):870-3
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Amino Acid Substitution
Canada
Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - genetics
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - genetics
Europe
Female
Humans
Insulin Receptor Substrate Proteins
Male
Phosphoproteins - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Potassium Channels, Inwardly Rectifying - genetics
Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear - genetics
Transcription Factors - genetics
Abstract
It has been proposed that type 1 and 2 diabetes might share common pathophysiological pathways and, to some extent, genetic background. However, to date there has been no convincing data to establish a molecular genetic link between them. We have genotyped three single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with type 2 diabetes in a large type 1 diabetic family collection of European descent: Gly972Arg in the insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) gene, Glu23Lys in the potassium inwardly-rectifying channel gene (KCNJ11), and Pro12Ala in the peroxisome proliferative-activated receptor gamma2 gene (PPARG2). We were unable to confirm a recently published association of the IRS1 Gly972Arg variant with type 1 diabetes. Moreover, KCNJ11 Glu23Lys showed no association with type 1 diabetes (P > 0.05). However, the PPARG2 Pro12Ala variant showed evidence of association (RR 1.15, 95% CI 1.04-1.28, P = 0.008). Additional studies need to be conducted to confirm this result.
PubMed ID
14988278 View in PubMed
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Analysis of the type 2 diabetes gene, TCF7L2, in 13,795 type 1 diabetes cases and control subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166892
Source
Diabetologia. 2007 Jan;50(1):212-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
S F Field
J M M Howson
D J Smyth
N M Walker
D B Dunger
J A Todd
Source
Diabetologia. 2007 Jan;50(1):212-3
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - genetics
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - genetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Humans
Iceland
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Risk factors
TCF Transcription Factors - genetics
Transcription Factor 7-Like 2 Protein
United States
Notes
Cites: Diabetologia. 2001 Jul;44(7):914-2211508279
Cites: Nat Genet. 2006 Mar;38(3):320-316415884
Cites: Diabetes. 2006 Sep;55(9):2649-5316936217
Cites: Arch Dis Child. 2005 Oct;90(10):1039-4416177159
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2006 Feb;35(1):34-4116155052
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2006 Jul 20;355(3):241-5016855264
Cites: Diabetes. 2006 Sep;55(9):2640-416936215
Cites: Diabetes. 2006 Sep;55(9):2645-816936216
Comment In: Diabetologia. 2007 Aug;50(8):178017589824
PubMed ID
17063324 View in PubMed
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Analysis of the vitamin D receptor gene sequence variants in type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47171
Source
Diabetes. 2004 Oct;53(10):2709-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Sergey Nejentsev
Jason D Cooper
Lisa Godfrey
Joanna M M Howson
Helen Rance
Sarah Nutland
Neil M Walker
Cristian Guja
Constantin Ionescu-Tirgoviste
David A Savage
Dag E Undlien
Kjersti S Rønningen
Eva Tuomilehto-Wolf
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Kathleen M Gillespie
Susan M Ring
David P Strachan
Barry Widmer
David Dunger
John A Todd
Author Affiliation
Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation/Wellcome Trust DiabetesInflammation Laboratory, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, University of Cambridge, WT/MRC building, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, CB2 2XY, UK. sergey.nejentsev@cimr.cam.ac.uk
Source
Diabetes. 2004 Oct;53(10):2709-12
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - genetics
Great Britain
Humans
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Receptors, Calcitriol - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Variation (Genetics) - genetics
Abstract
Vitamin D is known to modulate the immune system, and its administration has been associated with reduced risk of type 1 diabetes. Vitamin D acts via its receptor (VDR). Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the VDR gene have been commonly studied, and evidence of association with type 1 diabetes has been reported previously. We sequenced the VDR gene region and developed its SNP map. Here we analyzed association of the 98 VDR SNPs in up to 3,763 type 1 diabetic families. First, we genotyped all 98 SNPs in a minimum of 458 U.K. families with two affected offspring. We further tested eight SNPs, including four SNPs associated with P
PubMed ID
15448105 View in PubMed
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An internet-based learning portfolio in resident education: the KOALA multicentre programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198717
Source
Med Educ. 2000 Jun;34(6):474-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
M F Fung
M. Walker
K F Fung
L. Temple
F. Lajoie
G. Bellemare
S C Bryson
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
Med Educ. 2000 Jun;34(6):474-9
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Computer-Assisted Instruction - methods
Gynecology - education
Humans
Internet
Internship and Residency
Learning
Obstetrics - education
Pilot Projects
Software
Students, Medical - psychology
Teaching - methods
Abstract
To describe the Computerized Obstetrics and Gynecology Automated Learning Anaalysis (KOALAtrade mark), a multicentre, Internet-based learning portfolio and to determine its effects on residents' perception of their self-directed learning abilities.
The KOALA programme allows residents to record their obstetrical, surgical, ultrasound, and ambulatory patient encounters and to document critical incidents of learning or elements of surprise that arose during these encounters. By prompting the student to reflect on these learning experiences, KOALA encourages residents to articulate questions which can be directly pursued through hypertext links to evidence-based literature. Four Canadian residency training programmes participated in the pilot project, from February to May 1997, using a dynamic relational database with a central server. All participants completed the Self-directed Learning Readiness Scale and a learning habits questionnaire. The impact of the KOALA programme on residents' perception of their self-directed learning abilities was measured by comparing KOALA-naive schools (schools 2, 3, and 4) with school 1 (exposed to the KOALA prototype for 1 year). Ordered variables were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test and continuous variables with the Student t test (statistical significance P
PubMed ID
10792690 View in PubMed
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Anorexigens and pulmonary hypertension in the United States: results from the surveillance of North American pulmonary hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199216
Source
Chest. 2000 Mar;117(3):870-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
S. Rich
L. Rubin
A M Walker
S. Schneeweiss
L. Abenhaim
Author Affiliation
Section of Cardiology, Rush Medical College, Chicago, IL 60612-3824, srich@rush.edu
Source
Chest. 2000 Mar;117(3):870-4
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Amphetamines - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Appetite Depressants - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Causality
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Fenfluramine - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Humans
Hypertension, Pulmonary - chemically induced - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Phentermine - adverse effects
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The use of appetite suppressants in Europe has been associated with the development of primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH). Recently, fenfluramine appetite suppressants became widely used in the United States but were withdrawn in September 1997 because of concerns over adverse effects.
We conducted a prospective surveillance study on patients diagnosed with pulmonary hypertension at 12 large referral centers in North America. Data collected on patients seen from September 1, 1996, to December 31, 1997, included the cause of the pulmonary hypertension and its severity. Patients with no identifiable cause of pulmonary hypertension were classed as PPH. A history of drug exposure also was taken with special attention on the use of antidepressants, anorexigens, and amphetamines.
Five hundred seventy-nine patients were studied, 205 with PPH and 374 with pulmonary hypertension from other causes (secondary pulmonary hypertension [SPH]). The use of anorexigens was common in both groups. However, of the medications surveyed, only the fenfluramines had a significant preferential association with PPH as compared with SPH (adjusted odds ratio for use > 6 months, 7.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.7 to 32.4). The association was stronger with longer duration of use when compared to shorter duration of use and was more pronounced in recent users than in remote users. An unexpectedly high (11.4%) number of patients with SPH had used anorexigens.
The magnitude of the association with PPH, the increase of association with increasing duration of use, and the specificity for fenfluramines are consistent with previous studies indicating that fenfluramines are causally related to PPH. The high prevalence of anorexigen use in patients with SPH also raises the possibility that these drugs precipitate pulmonary hypertension in patients with underlying conditions associated with SPH.
Notes
Comment In: Chest. 2000 Nov;118(5):1516-711083718
PubMed ID
10713017 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of cutaneous aspergillosis in a tertiary-care hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212513
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1996 Mar;17(3):170-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
E A Bryce
M. Walker
S. Scharf
A T Lim
A. Walsh
N. Sharp
J A Smith
Author Affiliation
Division of Medical Microbiology, Vancouver Hospital, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1996 Mar;17(3):170-2
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aspergillosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Bandages
British Columbia - epidemiology
Dermatomycoses - epidemiology - prevention & control
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Facility Design and Construction
Hospitals - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Population Surveillance - methods
Product Packaging
Retrospective Studies
Wound Infection - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
A cluster of four cases of surgical and burn wound aspergillosis occurred in a 900-bed, adult, tertiary-care hospital. The source was traced to the outside packages of dressing supplies, which had become contaminated during construction in the central Inventory Control area. This resulted in patients with large exposed surface areas being inoculated directly with Aspergillus spores.
PubMed ID
8708356 View in PubMed
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Attitude and knowledge about genetics and genetic testing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150899
Source
Public Health Genomics. 2010;13(2):80-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
H. Etchegary
M. Cappelli
B. Potter
M. Vloet
I. Graham
M. Walker
B. Wilson
Author Affiliation
IWK Health Centre, Halifax, NS, B3K 6R8 Canada. holly.etchegary@iwk.nshealth.ca
Source
Public Health Genomics. 2010;13(2):80-8
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Data Collection
Female
Genetic Testing - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Abstract
Increasing numbers of health care users may be confronted with new genetic knowledge and discoveries that offer new types of medical decision-making. How people use these new insights and make decisions about genetic risk depends, at least in part, on their knowledge and attitudes about human genetics.
A postal survey administered to 560 women who had been offered prenatal screening in Ontario measured knowledge about, and attitudes toward, genetic testing and the uses of genetic information.
Respondents strongly supported the use of genetic information to improve disease diagnosis and to help understand disease causes; however, people also held a more critical attitude towards certain aspects of testing and genetic information. Relatively high levels of knowledge about genetics were also observed in this sample, although there were deficits in specific areas (e.g., transmission patterns).
Despite overall positive attitudes towards genetics, participants held more critical attitudes towards certain aspects of testing and the uses of genetic information. It would be unwise for genetics policy-makers and stakeholders to assume that a better-informed public would automatically be more supportive of all genetics research and new genetic discoveries.
PubMed ID
19451701 View in PubMed
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Breastfeeding in women with diabetes: lower rates despite greater rewards. A population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113738
Source
Diabet Med. 2013 Sep;30(9):1094-101
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
S A Finkelstein
E. Keely
D S Feig
X. Tu
A S Yasseen
M. Walker
Author Affiliation
Obstetrics and Maternal Newborn Investigations (OMNI) Research Group, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON, Canada. Sara.finkelstein@gmail.com
Source
Diabet Med. 2013 Sep;30(9):1094-101
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Feeding
Cohort Studies
Complementary Therapies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - prevention & control
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - prevention & control
Diabetes, Gestational - prevention & control
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Ontario
Patient Education as Topic
Postnatal Care
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Diabetics - prevention & control
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore intention to breastfeed and breastfeeding rates in hospital and on discharge across women with pre-gestational or gestational diabetes mellitus, or no diabetes.
A retrospective cohort analysis was conducted using data from four Ontario hospitals. Women who delivered a viable infant between 1 April 2008 and 31 March 2010 were included in the study. Unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios were calculated for each outcome measure and were used to compare the breastfeeding rates among women with and without diabetes.
After controlling for potential confounders, women with insulin-treated diabetes were less likely to intend to breastfeed, when compared with women without diabetes (adjusted odds ratio 0.49, 95% CI 0.27-0.89). In hospital, women with insulin-treated diabetes were least likely to breastfeed (odds ratio 0.42, 95% CI 0.26-0.67), followed by women with non-insulin-treated diabetes (odds ratio 0.50, 95% CI 0.26-0.96) and women with gestational diabetes (odds ratio 0.77, 95% CI 0.68-0.87) when compared with women without diabetes. On discharge, women with insulin-treated diabetes were least likely to breastfeed (odds ratio 0.38, 95% CI 0.24-0.60), followed by women with gestational diabetes (odds ratio 0.75, 95% CI 0.66-0.85); rates of breastfeeding among women with non-insulin-treated diabetes were comparable on discharge with those of women without diabetes. Women seeking care from an antenatal provider other than a physician were 2-3 times more likely to breastfeed in hospital and on discharge.
Women with insulin-treated diabetes had the poorest outcomes with respect to breastfeeding rates. Gestational and non-insulin-treated diabetes were associated with lower rates of breastfeeding in hospital, while gestational diabetes was additionally associated with lower breastfeeding rates on discharge.
PubMed ID
23692476 View in PubMed
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51 records – page 1 of 6.