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Infant mortality in Sweden and Finland: implications for the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59868
Source
J Perinatol. 1990 Mar;10(1):3-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1990
Author
H M Wallace
A. Ericsson
A M Bolander
M. Vienonen
Author Affiliation
Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University, California.
Source
J Perinatol. 1990 Mar;10(1):3-11
Date
Mar-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Child Health Services
Finland
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Maternal health services
Sweden
United States
Abstract
Sweden had the lowest reported infant mortality rate (IMR) among countries of the world from 1920 until 1980. Since 1981, Sweden, Japan, and Finland have shared this number one ranking on a somewhat rotating basis. The United States ranks 18th. In 1985, the reported IMRs in Japan, Sweden, and Finland were 5.5, 6.8, and 6.3, respectively, while that of the United States was 10.6 per 1000 live births. This article presents detailed data on IMR in Sweden, Finland, and the United States. It also includes data on neonatal mortality, postneonatal mortality, age of death, and incidence of low birth-weight in the three countries. The paper briefly describes background information on maternal and infant care in Sweden and Finland, including prenatal care, labor and delivery, sex education, family planning, abortion, infant care, and social benefits in Sweden and Finland. The paper gives possible reasons for the achievement of the low IMR in Sweden and Finland, and considers the implications for the United States.
PubMed ID
2313391 View in PubMed
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Teenage pregnancy in Sweden and Finland. Implications for the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65312
Source
J Adolesc Health Care. 1989 May;10(3):231-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1989
Author
H M Wallace
M. Vienonen
Author Affiliation
Graduate School of Public Health, College of Health and Human Services, San Diego State University, CA 92182-0405.
Source
J Adolesc Health Care. 1989 May;10(3):231-6
Date
May-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Therapeutic - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Family Planning Services
Female
Fertility
Finland
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in adolescence
Sex Education
Sweden
United States
Abstract
Fertility and the rates of pregnancy, live births, and abortion in teenagers in the United States are considerably higher than in most other developed countries of northern and western Europe. Fertility rates in teenagers in Sweden have declined significantly. The teaching of family life education is universal in Sweden and almost universal in Finland. Sex is openly discussed within society in both countries. Family planning and abortion services are geographically very available in both countries and both services and supplies are free. The educational level of both males and females is high in both countries. The United States has the opportunity to reduce teenage pregnancy by applying the experience of Sweden and Finland in the fields of family life education and family planning services.
PubMed ID
2715098 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Katilolehti. 1990 Sep;95(6):6-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1990