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Canadian Digestive Health Foundation Public Impact Series 4: celiac disease in Canada. Incidence, prevalence, and direct and indirect economic impact.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123215
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2012 Jun;26(6):350-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Richard N Fedorak
Connie M Switzer
Ron J Bridges
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. richard.fedorak@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2012 Jun;26(6):350-2
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Celiac Disease - economics - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Prevalence
Abstract
The Canadian Digestive Health Foundation initiated a scientific program to assess the incidence, prevalence, mortality and economic impact of digestive disorders across Canada in 2009. The current article presents the updated findings from the study concerning celiac disease.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22720277 View in PubMed
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Endemicity and phylogeny of the human T cell lymphotropic virus type II subtype A from the Kayapo Indians of Brazil: evidence for limited regional dissemination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34809
Source
AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses. 1996 May 1;12(7):635-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-1996
Author
W M Switzer
F L Black
D. Pieniazek
R J Biggar
R B Lal
W. Heneine
Author Affiliation
Retrovirus Diseases Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA.
Source
AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses. 1996 May 1;12(7):635-40
Date
May-1-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Base Sequence
Brazil - epidemiology
Child
DNA, Viral
Female
HTLV-II Infections - epidemiology - virology
Human T-lymphotropic virus 2 - classification - genetics
Humans
Indians, South American
Molecular Sequence Data
Phylogeny
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Prevalence
Repetitive Sequences, Nucleic Acid
Abstract
Long terminal repeat (LTR)-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of human T cell lymphotropic virus type II (HTLV-II) from 17 seropositive Kayapo Indians from Brazil showed that all 17 samples contained a unique HTLV-IIa subtype (A-II). Additional RFLP screening demonstrated the presence of this subtype in two of three Brazilian blood donors and a Mexican prostitute and her child. In contrast, 129 samples from blood donors and intravenous drug users (IDUs) from the United States, two Pueblo Indian samples, five samples from Norwegian IDUs, and two samples from blood donors from Denmark were all found to be a different HTLV-IIa subtype (A-III). Phylogenetic analysis of two Kayapo and one Mexican LTR sequences showed that they cluster with a subtype A-II sequence from a Brazilian blood donor and with sequences from two prostitutes from Ghana and Cameroon. These results demonstrate that infection with the A-II subtype is endemic among the Kayapo Amerindians, has disseminated to non-Indian populations in Brazil, and is also present in Mexico. Furthermore, the A-II subtype does not appear to represent an origin for the HTLV-IIa infection in urban areas of the United States and Europe. This study provides evidence that HTLV-IIa may be a Paleo-Indian subtype as previously suggested for HTLV-IIb.
PubMed ID
8743089 View in PubMed
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No evidence for XMRV nucleic acids, infectious virus or anti-XMRV antibodies in Canadian patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129385
Source
PLoS One. 2011;6(11):e27870
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Imke Steffen
D Lorne Tyrrell
Eleanor Stein
Leilani Montalvo
Tzong-Hae Lee
Yanchen Zhou
Kai Lu
William M Switzer
Shaohua Tang
Hongwei Jia
Darren Hockman
Deanna M Santer
Michael Logan
Amir Landi
John Law
Michael Houghton
Graham Simmons
Author Affiliation
Blood Systems Research Institute, San Francisco, California, United States of America.
Source
PLoS One. 2011;6(11):e27870
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Anti-Idiotypic - blood
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Blotting, Western
Canada
Case-Control Studies
DNA, Viral - genetics
Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic - blood - immunology - virology
Female
Humans
Leukemia Virus, Murine - genetics - isolation & purification
Male
Middle Aged
Polymerase Chain Reaction
RNA, Messenger - genetics
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Retroviridae Infections - diagnosis - virology
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Tumor Virus Infections - diagnosis - virology
Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus - genetics - isolation & purification
Abstract
The gammaretroviruses xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV)-related virus (XMRV) and MLV have been reported to be more prevalent in plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) patients than in healthy controls. Here, we report the complex analysis of whole blood and plasma samples from 58 CFS patients and 57 controls from Canada for the presence of XMRV/MLV nucleic acids, infectious virus, and XMRV/MLV-specific antibodies. Multiple techniques were employed, including nested and qRT-PCR, cell culture, and immunoblotting. We found no evidence of XMRV or MLV in humans and conclude that CFS is not associated with these gammaretroviruses.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22114717 View in PubMed
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One solution to transporting the transport incubator.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210698
Source
Biomed Instrum Technol. 1996 Nov-Dec;30(6):496-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
M. Switzer
Author Affiliation
Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Biomed Instrum Technol. 1996 Nov-Dec;30(6):496-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulances
Equipment Design
Humans
Incubators, Infant
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Ontario
Transportation of Patients
PubMed ID
8959302 View in PubMed
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