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Analysis of the lamin A/C gene as a candidate for type II diabetes susceptibility in Pima Indians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194139
Source
Diabetologia. 2001 Jun;44(6):779-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
J K Wolford
R L Hanson
C. Bogardus
M. Prochazka
Author Affiliation
Phoenix Epidemiology and Research Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Phoenix, Arizona 85016, USA.
Source
Diabetologia. 2001 Jun;44(6):779-82
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Base Sequence - genetics
Body mass index
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - genetics
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Humans
Indians, North American - genetics
Lamin Type A
Lamins
Nuclear Proteins - genetics
Obesity - genetics - pathology
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Abstract
Lamin A/C (LMNA) is located within a region on chromosome 1q that has been linked with Type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus in Pima Indians. Rare mutations in exon 8 of LMNA underlie Dunnigan-Type familial partial lipodystrophy, a disease characterized by regional adipocyte degeneration and frequently accompanied by insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and diabetes. A more common variant in exon 10 (3408C/T) has recently been associated with obesity in non-diabetic aboriginal Canadian subjects. Because obesity is a strongly predisposing factor for Type II diabetes, we hypothesized that the LMNA 3408C/T variant could be associated with diabetes and body mass index in Pima Indians.
To determine whether the LMNA 3408C/T variant contributes to Type II diabetes susceptibility, we genotyped the polymorphism in 1,338 Pimas using allelic discrimination technology. The locus was screened for additional variants in 20 diabetic Pima Indians and non-diabetic Pima Indians using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography and dideoxy sequencing.
We found no evidence for association of 3408C/T with diabetes, body mass index, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, leptin concentrations, or indices of insulin sensitivity and secretion. Subsequent screening of the remaining LMNA exons and flanking sequences revealed only rare variants in intron 4 and the 3'UTR, showing no frequency differences between diabetic and non-diabetic Pima Indians. We reassessed the linkage with diabetes following adjustment for the LMNA 3408C/T variant; adjustment for the effects of LMNA did not substantially modify the evidence for linkage.
We conclude that the LMNA 3408C/T variant probably does not play a role in susceptibility to diabetes or obesity in Pima Indians.
PubMed ID
11440372 View in PubMed
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Atopic conditions and brain tumor risk in children and adolescents--an international case-control study (CEFALO).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258950
Source
Ann Oncol. 2014 Apr;25(4):902-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
X. Shu
M. Prochazka
B. Lannering
J. Schüz
M. Röösli
T. Tynes
C E Kuehni
T V Andersen
D. Infanger
L S Schmidt
A H Poulsen
L. Klaeboe
T. Eggen
M. Feychting
Source
Ann Oncol. 2014 Apr;25(4):902-8
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Brain Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology - pathology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Glioma - complications - epidemiology - pathology
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - complications - epidemiology - pathology
Male
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
A number of epidemiological studies indicate an inverse association between atopy and brain tumors in adults, particularly gliomas. We investigated the association between atopic disorders and intracranial brain tumors in children and adolescents, using international collaborative CEFALO data.
CEFALO is a population-based case-control study conducted in Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and Switzerland, including all children and adolescents in the age range 7-19 years diagnosed with a primary brain tumor between 2004 and 2008. Two controls per case were randomly selected from population registers matched on age, sex, and geographic region. Information about atopic conditions and potential confounders was collected through personal interviews.
In total, 352 cases (83%) and 646 controls (71%) participated in the study. For all brain tumors combined, there was no association between ever having had an atopic disorder and brain tumor risk [odds ratio 1.03; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.70-1.34]. The OR was 0.76 (95% CI 0.53-1.11) for a current atopic condition (in the year before diagnosis) and 1.22 (95% CI 0.86-1.74) for an atopic condition in the past. Similar results were observed for glioma.
There was no association between atopic conditions and risk of all brain tumors combined or of glioma in particular. Stratification on current or past atopic conditions suggested the possibility of reverse causality, but may also the result of random variation because of small numbers in subgroups. In addition, an ongoing tumor treatment may affect the manifestation of atopic conditions, which could possibly affect recall when reporting about a history of atopic diseases. Only a few studies on atopic conditions and pediatric brain tumors are currently available, and the evidence is conflicting.
PubMed ID
24608192 View in PubMed
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Breaking the matching in nested case-control data offered several advantages for risk estimation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283849
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2017 Feb;82:79-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Bénédicte Delcoigne
E. Colzani
M. Prochazka
G. Gagliardi
P. Hall
M. Abrahamowicz
K. Czene
M. Reilly
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2017 Feb;82:79-86
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - radiotherapy
Case-Control Studies
Causality
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - radiotherapy
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To demonstrate the advantage of using weighted Cox regression to analyze nested case-control data in overcoming limitations encountered with traditional conditional logistic regression.
We analyzed data from 1,051 women who were sampled in a case-control study of lung cancer nested within a cohort of breast cancer patients. We investigated how lung cancer risk is associated with radiation therapy and modified by smoking, with both conditional logistic regression and weighted Cox regression models.
In contrast to logistic regression, weighted Cox regression exploited the information regarding radiation dose received by each individual lung. The weighted method also mitigated a problem of overmatching apparent in the data and revealed that the risk of radiotherapy-associated lung cancer was modified by smoking (P = 0.026) with a hazard ratio of 4.09 (2.31, 7.24) in unexposed smokers and 8.63 (5.04, 14.79) in smokers receiving doses >13 Gy. The cumulative risk of lung cancer increased steadily with increasing radiotherapy dose in smokers, whereas no such effect was found in nonsmokers.
The weighted Cox regression makes optimal and versatile use of the information in a nested case-control design, allowing dose-response analysis of exposure to paired organs and enabling the estimation of cumulative risk.
PubMed ID
27923734 View in PubMed
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Lung cancer risks in women with previous breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19023
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2002 Jul;38(11):1520-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2002
Author
M. Prochazka
F. Granath
A. Ekbom
P G Shields
P. Hall
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, PO Box 281, S-171 77, Stockholm, Sweden. michaela.prochazka@mep.ki.se
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2002 Jul;38(11):1520-5
Date
Jul-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Age of Onset
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Second Primary - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Evaluation of the adverse effects of breast cancer treatment is becoming increasingly important in light of the earlier detection and prolonged survival of the patients. The beneficial effect of post-surgical radiotherapy has lately been challenged. The Swedish Cancer Registry (SCR) was used to identify approximately 141000 women with breast cancer, diagnosed between 1958 and 1997, followed-up for the occurrence of lung cancer. Standardised incidence ratios and expected number of lung cancers were calculated using incidence rates from the SCR. There were 613 subsequent lung cancers and a statistically significant increased risk of lung cancer was seen >5 years after breast cancer diagnosis, in contrast to a significantly decreased risk the first five years after the breast cancer diagnosis. The latter finding was confined to those >60 years of age when diagnosed with breast cancer. When restricting the analyses to those cases with information on the laterality of breast and lung cancer, an increased risk of a lung cancer on the same side as the breast cancer was seen >10 years after the breast cancer diagnosis. Birth cohorts with a higher smoking prevalence, i.e. 1930-1949, revealed a higher risk of lung cancer, than previous birth cohorts. Women with breast cancer have a significantly increased risk of developing a subsequent lung cancer possibly related to an interaction between radiotherapy and smoking.
PubMed ID
12110499 View in PubMed
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Patterns of exposure to infectious diseases and social contacts in early life and risk of brain tumours in children and adolescents: an International Case-Control Study (CEFALO).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114081
Source
Br J Cancer. 2013 Jun 11;108(11):2346-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-11-2013
Author
T V Andersen
L S Schmidt
A H Poulsen
M. Feychting
M. Röösli
T. Tynes
D. Aydin
M. Prochazka
B. Lannering
L. Klæboe
T. Eggen
C E Kuehni
K. Schmiegelow
J. Schüz
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Danish Cancer Society, Strandboulevarden 49, Copenhagen 2100, Denmark. veje@cancer.dk
Source
Br J Cancer. 2013 Jun 11;108(11):2346-53
Date
Jun-11-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Brain Neoplasms - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Female
Humans
Infection - epidemiology
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Switzerland - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Infectious diseases and social contacts in early life have been proposed to modulate brain tumour risk during late childhood and adolescence.
CEFALO is an interview-based case-control study in Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland, including children and adolescents aged 7-19 years with primary intracranial brain tumours diagnosed between 2004 and 2008 and matched population controls.
The study included 352 cases (participation rate: 83%) and 646 controls (71%). There was no association with various measures of social contacts: daycare attendance, number of childhours at daycare, attending baby groups, birth order or living with other children. Cases of glioma and embryonal tumours had more frequent sick days with infections in the first 6 years of life compared with controls. In 7-19 year olds with 4+ monthly sick day, the respective odds ratios were 2.93 (95% confidence interval: 1.57-5.50) and 4.21 (95% confidence interval: 1.24-14.30).
There was little support for the hypothesis that social contacts influence childhood and adolescent brain tumour risk. The association between reported sick days due to infections and risk of glioma and embryonal tumour may reflect involvement of immune functions, recall bias or inverse causality and deserve further attention.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23652309 View in PubMed
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