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Analysis of MHC region genetics in Finnish patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: evidence for different locus-specific effects in polyarticular vs pauciarticular subsets and a shared DRB1 epitope.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184602
Source
Genes Immun. 2003 Jul;4(5):326-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
J A Runstadler
H. Säilä
A. Savolainen
M. Leirisalo-Repo
K. Aho
E. Tuomilehto-Wolf
J. Tuomilehto
M F Seldin
Author Affiliation
Rowe Program in Human Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Department of Biological Chemistry, University of California, Davis, USA. jarunstadler@ucdavis.edu
Source
Genes Immun. 2003 Jul;4(5):326-35
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Arthritis, Juvenile - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 6 - genetics
Finland
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
HLA-DR Antigens
HLA-DRB1 Chains
Humans
Linkage Disequilibrium - genetics
Major Histocompatibility Complex - genetics
Microsatellite Repeats - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Abstract
This study used Finnish juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) probands with pauciarticular and rheumatoid factor (RF) negative polyarticular subtypes of JIA to further define the genetic susceptibility to JIA. We examined 16 markers spanning an 18 cM region of chromosome 6 encompassing the MHC and surrounding genomic region in a set of 235 Finnish JIA nuclear families and 639 Finnish control individuals. Analysis by case/control association and transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) methods each demonstrated strong evidence for a susceptibility locus near the D6S2447 microsatellite (P
PubMed ID
12847547 View in PubMed
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Annual incidence of inflammatory joint diseases in a population based study in southern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13943
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2002 Oct;61(10):911-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
M K Söderlin
O. Börjesson
H. Kautiainen
T. Skogh
M. Leirisalo-Repo
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Växjö Central Hospital, 351 85 Växjö, Sweden. maria.soderlin@ltkronberg.se
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2002 Oct;61(10):911-5
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Arthritis - epidemiology
Arthritis, Psoriatic - epidemiology
Arthritis, Reactive - epidemiology
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To estimate the annual incidence of inflammatory joint diseases in a population based prospective referral study in an adult population in Kronoberg County in southern Sweden. METHODS: The patients were referred from primary healthcare centres to the rheumatology department in Växjö Central Hospital or to the one private rheumatologist in Växjö participating in the study. Additionally, the hospital records for patients with joint aspirates during the inclusion period were checked. The patients were registered as incident cases if the onset of the joint inflammation was between 1 May 1999 and 1 May 2000. A systematic follow up of incoming referrals was conducted up to 31 January 2001. Children under the age of 16 and patients with septic arthritis, crystal arthropathies, and osteoarthritis were excluded from the study. RESULTS: A total of 151 new cases with inflammatory joint diseases were identified during one year, corresponding to a total annual incidence of 115/100 000. Of these, 31 patients (21%) had rheumatoid arthritis, the annual incidence being 24/100 000 (for women 29/100 000, and for men 18/100 000). Reactive arthritis was diagnosed in 37 patients (24%, annual incidence 28/100 000) and 54 patients had undifferentiated arthritis (36%, annual incidence 41/100 000). Eleven patients presented with psoriatic arthritis (7%, annual incidence 8/100 000). The incidence of Lyme arthritis was small in this non-endemic area, and the incidence of sarcoid arthritis corresponded to that in earlier studies. CONCLUSION: This is the first prospective population based annual incidence study of early arthritis in Sweden. In this population, 36% of the incident cases had undifferentiated arthritis, whereas rheumatoid arthritis and reactive arthritis accounted for 45% of the cases. The incidence figures compare well with figures reported from other countries.
PubMed ID
12228162 View in PubMed
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Anti-RA 33 as a marker antibody of rheumatoid arthritis in a Finnish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219911
Source
Clin Exp Rheumatol. 1993 Nov-Dec;11(6):645-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
K. Aho
G. Steiner
P. Kurki
L. Paimela
M. Leirisalo-Repo
T. Palosuo
J S Smolen
Author Affiliation
Department of Immunobiology, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Clin Exp Rheumatol. 1993 Nov-Dec;11(6):645-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies - blood
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - blood - epidemiology - immunology
Biological Markers - blood
Cohort Studies
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Abstract
To obtain information on anti-RA 33 as a marker antibody of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a panel of Finnish sera were tested by immunoblotting with partially purified RA 33 antigen. Six of 100 specimens from patients with RA, one of 39 specimens from subjects who later developed seropositive RA, and one of 50 specimens from subjects with "false-positive" rheumatoid factor reactions were positive. The findings are compatible with the concept that anti-RA 33 is associated with RA from its onset and can even precede the disease. However, the prevalence of this antibody in Finnish RA patients is remarkably low compared to patients from continental Europe.
PubMed ID
8299258 View in PubMed
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Campylobacter-triggered reactive arthritis: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190697
Source
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2002 Mar;41(3):312-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
T. Hannu
L. Mattila
H. Rautelin
P. Pelkonen
P. Lahdenne
A. Siitonen
M. Leirisalo-Repo
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2002 Mar;41(3):312-8
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arthritis, Reactive - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Campylobacter - classification - isolation & purification
Campylobacter Infections - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Abstract
To study the incidence and clinical picture of Campylobacter-associated reactive arthritis (ReA) and other reactive musculoskeletal symptoms in the population.
A questionnaire on enteric and extraintestinal, including specifically musculoskeletal, symptoms was sent to 870 consecutive patients with Campylobacter-positive stool culture and 1440 matched controls. Analysis of self-reported musculoskeletal symptoms with clinical examination was performed.
Forty-five of the patients (7%) had ReA and eight (1%) had reactive tendinitis, enthesopathy or bursitis. No child had ReA. The arthritis was oligo- or polyarticular, and, in most cases, mild. HLA-B27 was positive in 14% of ReA patients. Of the 45 ReA patients, 37 had C. jejuni and 8 had C. coli infection. No controls had ReA.
ReA is common following Campylobacter infection, with an annual incidence of 4.3 per 100000. At the population level, acute ReA is mild, more frequent in adults, and not associated with HLA-B27. Besides C. jejuni, C. coli can trigger ReA.
PubMed ID
11934969 View in PubMed
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Causes of death in patients with rheumatoid arthritis autopsied during a 40-year period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155568
Source
Rheumatol Int. 2008 Oct;28(12):1245-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
R. Koivuniemi
L. Paimela
R. Suomalainen
H. Piirainen
M. Karesoja
T. Helve
M. Leirisalo-Repo
Author Affiliation
Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital, PO BOX 263, 00029 HUS, Helsinki, Finland. riitta.koivuniemi@hus.fi
Source
Rheumatol Int. 2008 Oct;28(12):1245-52
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - complications - mortality
Autopsy
Case-Control Studies
Cause of Death - trends
Coronary Disease - mortality
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Abstract
We studied causes of death (CoDs) between 1952 and 1991 assessed by a clinician before autopsy and then determined at autopsy by a pathologist in 369 subjects with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 370 subjects without RA (non-RA). We analysed clinical data for RA subjects between 1973 and 1991. In RA subjects, leading autopsy-based CoDs were RA, cardiovascular diseases and infections. Between diagnoses of CoDs by the clinician and those determined by the pathologist, RA subjects had lower agreement than did the non-RA regarding coronary deaths (Kappa reliability measure: 0.33 vs. 0.46). In non-RA subjects, autopsy-based coronary deaths showed a decline since the 1970s with no such decline in RA. Between subjects treated at any time during RA with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs and those without, autopsy-based CoDs were similar. Coronary death being less accurately diagnosed in RA subjects may indicate that coronary heart disease in RA patients often remains unrecognized.
PubMed ID
18716780 View in PubMed
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Co-morbidities in Finnish patients with rheumatoid arthritis: 15-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112483
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2013;42(6):451-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
T. Tiippana-Kinnunen
H. Kautiainen
L. Paimela
M. Leirisalo-Repo
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Helsinki University Central Hospital , Helsinki , Finland.
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2013;42(6):451-6
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Disease Progression
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
To study the prevalence and importance of co-morbidities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) at the time of the diagnosis and after a 15-year follow-up, focusing on the relationship between co-morbidity and disease activity.
The study population comprised 87 patients with early RA (mean age 44 years, 79% female, and 65% rheumatoid factor positive) collected from the Helsinki area between 1986 and 1989. Data for co-morbidities were collected at baseline and at a 15-year examination or at the time of death, and the age-weighted Charlson co-morbidity index (CCIa) at baseline was calculated for each patient. The disease activity score based on 28 joints (DAS28) was assessed with three parameters at baseline and during the first year (DAS28 AUC0-12). The relationship between co-morbidity and activity of RA was studied in groups CCIa 0, CCIa 1-2, and CCIa = 3.
Adequate data were available in 80 patients with a mean age of 60 years and a mean disease duration of 15.4 years. At baseline, 20% of patients had at least one co-morbid condition (CC). At endpoint, 60% of the patients had some co-morbidity: 34% had one CC, 19% two, 5% three, and 2% four CCs. The most common end-point CCs were hypertension (30%), cardiovascular diseases (14%), and malignancies (11%). DAS28 AUC0-12 and DAS28 at end-point were higher in groups CCIa1-2 and CCIa = 3 than in CCIa 0.
Co-morbidities increased during the 15 years of RA and the patients with high baseline CCIa showed higher disease activity both in early disease and at end-point.
PubMed ID
23826623 View in PubMed
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The costs of early inflammatory joint disease: a population-based study in southern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13860
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2003;32(4):216-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
M K Söderlin
H. Kautiainen
D. Jonsson
T. Skogh
M. Leirisalo-Repo
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Växjö Central Hospital, 351 85 Växjö, Sweden. maria.soderlin@ltkronoberg.se
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2003;32(4):216-24
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthritis, Reactive - economics - therapy
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - economics - therapy
Cost of Illness
Female
Health Expenditures
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sick Leave
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study the costs and use of healthcare for patients during the first months with early joint inflammation, in a population-based prospective referral study in Southern Sweden. METHODS: Adult patients with arthritis for
PubMed ID
14626628 View in PubMed
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Crossreaction between antibodies to oxidised low-density lipoprotein and to cardiolipin in systemic lupus erythematosus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221267
Source
Lancet. 1993 Apr 10;341(8850):923-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-10-1993
Author
O. Vaarala
G. Alfthan
M. Jauhiainen
M. Leirisalo-Repo
K. Aho
T. Palosuo
Author Affiliation
Department of Immunobiology, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Lancet. 1993 Apr 10;341(8850):923-5
Date
Apr-10-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antibodies - blood
Antibodies, Anticardiolipin - blood
Arteriosclerosis - epidemiology - etiology - immunology
Cross Reactions
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitals, University
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - immunology
Lipoproteins, LDL - immunology
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - blood - complications - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Thrombosis - etiology - immunology
Abstract
Serum lipoproteins contain phospholipids and modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL) may thus act as a target for antiphospholipid antibodies. Raised concentrations of IgG antibodies against oxidised LDL were found in 47 of 61 (80%) patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). 46% of patients also had raised concentrations of IgG anticardiolipin antibodies. Binding of anticardiolipin antibodies to solid-phase cardiolipin was inhibited by oxidised LDL but not by native LDL in 16 of 21 sera from SLE patients. These observations suggest crossreactivity between antiphospholipid antibodies, which are closely associated with thrombosis in SLE, and antibodies to oxidised LDL, thus providing a possible link between thrombotic and atherosclerotic complications in SLE.
PubMed ID
8096266 View in PubMed
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Education, employment, absenteeism, and work disability in women with systemic lupus erythematosus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262551
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2015;44(2):157-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
S. Ekblom-Kullberg
H. Kautiainen
P. Alha
M. Leirisalo-Repo
H. Julkunen
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2015;44(2):157-62
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Educational Status
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Humans
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - complications
Middle Aged
Occupations
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
To study education, employment, absenteeism, and work disability (WD) in women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) compared to population controls.
The study included 181 women of working age with SLE (mean age 44.0 years, disease duration 12.7 years) and 549 female population controls matched for age living in the same metropolitan area of Helsinki. Data regarding education, employment, absenteeism, and WD in patients and controls were obtained by questionnaire and personal interview.
Basic education, vocational, or academic degrees and occupational categories in patients with SLE were similar to those in controls. In total, 62% of the patients were employed, compared to 77% of the controls (p
PubMed ID
25352057 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of the arthritis impact measurement scales (AIMS2) in Finnish patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182280
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2003;32(5):300-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
M. Arkela-Kautiainen
M. Kauppi
S. Heikkilä
H. Kautiainen
E. Mälkiä
M. Leirisalo-Repo
Author Affiliation
Rheumatism Foundation Hospital, Heinola, Finland. marja.arkela-kautiainen@medcare.inet.fi
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2003;32(5):300-5
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - physiopathology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cultural Characteristics
Disability Evaluation
Female
Finland
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Severity of Illness Index
Sickness Impact Profile
Abstract
To evaluate the validity and reliability of the Finnish version of the Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales (AIMS2) in Finnish patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
The reliability of the Finnish AIMS2 (Finn-AIMS2) questionnaire was assessed by test retest procedure and internal consistency of health-status scales. Construct validity was assessed by factor analysis, and convergent validity by correlation coefficients, with several disease activity and functional status variables.
Internal consistency was 0.79-0.89 and test retest reliability 0.72-0.97. Factor analysis identified three factors: physical, psychosocial, and pain. There were strong correlations between the Finn-AIMS2 health-status scales and the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ).
The Finn-AIMS2 questionnaire is a reliable and valid instrument for measuring health status in middle-aged Finnish patients with RA. The results also support the applicability of AIMS2 in comparisons in multinational studies.
PubMed ID
14690144 View in PubMed
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41 records – page 1 of 5.