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Dioxin and polychlorinated biphenyl concentrations in mother's serum and the timing of pubertal onset in sons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130773
Source
Epidemiology. 2011 Nov;22(6):827-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Olivier Humblet
Paige L Williams
Susan A Korrick
Oleg Sergeyev
Claude Emond
Linda S Birnbaum
Jane S Burns
Larisa Altshul
Donald G Patterson
Wayman E Turner
Mary M Lee
Boris Revich
Russ Hauser
Author Affiliation
Environmental and Occupational Medicine and Epidemiology Program, Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
Source
Epidemiology. 2011 Nov;22(6):827-35
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Child
Dioxins - adverse effects - blood
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Lead - adverse effects - blood
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Polychlorinated biphenyls - adverse effects - blood
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - blood
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Puberty - drug effects
Russia - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Animal studies have demonstrated that timing of pubertal onset can be altered by prenatal exposure to dioxins or polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), but studies of human populations have been quite limited.
We assessed the association between maternal serum concentrations of dioxins and PCBs and the sons' age of pubertal onset in a prospective cohort of 489 mother-son pairs from Chapaevsk, Russia, a town contaminated with these chemicals during past industrial activity. The boys were recruited at ages 8 to 9 years, and 4 years of annual follow-up data were included in the analysis. Serum samples were collected at enrollment from both mothers and sons for measurement of dioxin and PCB concentrations using high-resolution mass spectrometry. The sons' pubertal onset--defined as pubertal stage 2 or higher for genitalia (G) or pubic hair (P), or testicular volume >3 mL--was assessed annually by the same physician.
In multivariate Cox models, elevated maternal serum PCBs were associated with earlier pubertal onset defined by stage G2 or higher (4th quartile hazard ratio = 1.7 [95% confidence interval = 1.1- 2.5]), but not for stage P2 or higher or for testicular volume >3 mL. Maternal serum concentrations of dioxin toxic equivalents were not consistently associated with the sons' pubertal onset, although a dose-related delay in pubertal onset (only for G2 or higher) was seen among boys who breast-fed for 6 months or more.
Maternal PCB serum concentrations measured 8 or 9 years after sons' births--which may reflect sons' prenatal and early-life exposures--were associated with acceleration in some, but not all, measures of pubertal onset.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21968773 View in PubMed
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Economic analysis of erythropoietin use in orthopaedic surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202337
Source
Transfus Med. 1999 Mar;9(1):21-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
D. Coyle
K M Lee
D A Fergusson
A. Laupacis
Author Affiliation
Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Loeb Research Institute, Ottawa Civic Hospital, Canada.
Source
Transfus Med. 1999 Mar;9(1):21-30
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Transfusion
Canada
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Erythropoietin - economics - therapeutic use
Humans
Intraoperative Care - methods
Meta-Analysis as Topic
Orthopedics - economics
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Transplantation, Homologous
Abstract
The aim was to assess the cost-effectiveness of erythropoietin (EPO) to reduce patients' exposure to perioperative allogenic blood products in orthopaedic surgery. The use of EPO was assessed for EPO used alone and for EPO, to augment preoperative autologous donation (PAD). A decision analytical model was designed incorporating (i) the risk of receiving allogeneic blood, (ii) the costs of blood products, (iii) the likelihood of developing transfusion-related diseases, (iv) the costs of transfusion-related diseases, (v) the impact of transfusion-related diseases on patient morbidity and mortality and (vi) the effect of EPO upon the probability of transfusion. The efficacy of EPO was derived from data from a meta-analysis of published randomized trials. Estimates for the other parameters were obtained by a systematic review of the literature. EPO alone led to only modest incremental benefit compared to no intervention for orthopaedic surgery (0.000024 life-years gained per patient). As an augmentation to PAD, EPO also led to modest benefits (0.000006 life-years gained per patient). For EPO compared to no intervention, the incremental cost per life-year gained was $66 million (Canadian). For EPO to augment PAD, the incremental cost per life-year gained was $329 million (Canadian). Detailed sensitivity analysis did not reveal any circumstances in which the cost-effectiveness ratios reached a level generally considered attractive. On the basis of cost-effectiveness, the use of EPO to reduce perioperative allogeneic transfusions in orthopaedic surgery did not meet criteria conventionally considered acceptable.
PubMed ID
10216902 View in PubMed
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The impact of risk on preference values: implications for evaluations of postmenopausal osteoporosis therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192556
Source
Value Health. 2001 Sep-Oct;4(5):385-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
D. Coyle
G. Wells
I. Graham
K M Lee
J E Peterson
E. Papadimitropoulos
Author Affiliation
Departments of Medicine and Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. dcoyle@lri.ca
Source
Value Health. 2001 Sep-Oct;4(5):385-91
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Health
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - psychology
Consumer Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - psychology
Decision Making
Estrogen Replacement Therapy - utilization
Female
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - psychology
Humans
Middle Aged
Ontario
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - prevention & control
Perception
Probability
Raloxifene - therapeutic use
Regression Analysis
Risk assessment
Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators - therapeutic use
Value of Life - economics
Women's health
Abstract
The objective was to assess the impact of different levels of risk of disease on a woman's preferences for health states. Women were provided with health scenarios incorporating different levels of lifetime risks for breast cancer, hip fracture, and coronary heart disease (CHD). In this way, we were able to determine the incremental effect of changes in risks of each disease on preference values.
Preference values and utility scores were obtained for six health scenarios by both the feeling thermometer (FT) and standard gamble (SG) methods. Scenarios presented the different lifetime risks of CHD, breast cancer, and hip fracture associated with and not associated with long-term use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and raloxifene. Risks of breast cancer were based on perceived risks and population risks. The sample population consisted of 40 healthy female volunteers aged between 45 and 65 years randomly selected from the Ottawa-Carleton district.
Based on their perceived risk of breast cancer, the women had higher value scores for the raloxifene risk profile than for both HRT (p = .002) and no therapy (p = .003), with similar results for analyses based on population risks and from utility scores. Regression analysis showed that the risk of breast cancer (p
PubMed ID
11705129 View in PubMed
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Predictors of serum dioxin, furan, and PCB concentrations among women from Chapaevsk, Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142606
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Jul 15;44(14):5633-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2010
Author
Olivier Humblet
Paige L Williams
Susan A Korrick
Oleg Sergeyev
Claude Emond
Linda S Birnbaum
Jane S Burns
Larisa Altshul
Donald G Patterson
Wayman E Turner
Mary M Lee
Boris Revich
Russ Hauser
Author Affiliation
Environmental and Occupational Medicine and Epidemiology Program, Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Jul 15;44(14):5633-40
Date
Jul-15-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging
Dioxins - blood
Environmental Pollutants - chemistry
Female
Furans - blood
Humans
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Russia
Young Adult
Abstract
Dioxins, furans, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent and bioaccumulative toxic chemicals that are ubiquitous in the environment. We assessed predictors of their serum concentrations among women living in a Russian town contaminated by past industrial activity. Blood samples from 446 mothers aged 23-52 years were collected between 2003-2005 as part of the Russian Children's Study. Serum dioxin, furan, and PCB concentrations were quantified using high-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Potential determinants of exposure were collected through interviews. Multivariate linear regression models were used to identify predictors of serum concentrations and toxic equivalencies (TEQs). The median total PCB concentrations and total TEQs were 260 ng/g lipid and 25 pg TEQ/g lipid, respectively. In multivariate analyses, both total PCB concentrations and total TEQs increased significantly with age, residential proximity to a local chemical plant, duration of local farming, and consumption of local beef. Both decreased with longer breastfeeding, recent increases in body mass index, and later blood draw date. These demographic and lifestyle predictors showed generally similar associations with the various measures of serum dioxins, furans, and PCBs.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20578718 View in PubMed
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Temporal trends in serum concentrations of polychlorinated dioxins, furans, and PCBs among adult women living in Chapaevsk, Russia: a longitudinal study from 2000 to 2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133514
Source
Environ Health. 2011;10:62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Olivier Humblet
Oleg Sergeyev
Larisa Altshul
Susan A Korrick
Paige L Williams
Claude Emond
Linda S Birnbaum
Jane S Burns
Mary M Lee
Boris Revich
Andrey Shelepchikov
Denis Feshin
Russ Hauser
Author Affiliation
Environmental and Occupational Medicine and Epidemiology Program, Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
Source
Environ Health. 2011;10:62
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Benzofurans - blood
Dioxins - blood
Environmental Exposure
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Russia
Young Adult
Abstract
The present study assessed the temporal trend in serum concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans, and biphenyls (PCBs) among residents of a Russian town where levels of these chemicals are elevated due to prior industrial activity.
Two serum samples were collected from eight adult women (in 2000 and 2009), and analyzed with gas chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry.
The average total toxic equivalency (TEQ) decreased by 30% (from 36 to 25 pg/g lipid), and the average sum of PCB congeners decreased by 19% (from 291 to 211 ng/g lipid). Total TEQs decreased for seven of the eight women, and the sum of PCBs decreased for six of eight women. During this nine year period, larger decreases in serum TEQs and PCBs were found in women with greater increases in body mass index.
This study provides suggestive evidence that average serum concentrations of dioxins, furans, and PCBs are decreasing over time among residents of this town.
Notes
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Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Jul 15;44(14):5633-4020578718
PubMed ID
21696632 View in PubMed
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