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11 records – page 1 of 2.

Acquired immunodeficiency disease syndromes in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242649
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1982 Dec 15;127(12):1161-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-1982
Author
A G Jessamine
M A Baker
J M Doherty
E H Goldberg
S. Handzel
M. Laverdiére
J. Portnoy
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1982 Dec 15;127(12):1161-3
Date
Dec-15-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes - epidemiology
Male
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1981 Dec 10;305(24):1425-316272109
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1982 Jul 3;285(6334):17-96805793
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1982 Jun;96(6 Pt 1):693-7006283973
PubMed ID
7139462 View in PubMed
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Acquired immunodeficiency disease syndromes in Canada. 1982.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224435
Source
CMAJ. 1992 Feb 1;146(3):369-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-1992
Author
A G Jessamine
M A Baker
J M Doherty
E H Goldberg
S. Handzel
M. Laverdière
J. Portnoy
Source
CMAJ. 1992 Feb 1;146(3):369-70
Date
Feb-1-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - history
Canada
History, 20th Century
Humans
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1981 Dec 10;305(24):1425-316272109
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1982 Jun;96(6 Pt 1):693-7006283973
PubMed ID
1544048 View in PubMed
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AIDS in Haitian immigrants and in a Caucasian woman closely associated with Haitians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241400
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1983 Dec 1;129(11):1209-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-1983
Author
M. Laverdière
J. Tremblay
R. Lavallée
Y. Bonny
M. Lacombe
J. Boileau
J. Lachapelle
C. Lamoureux
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1983 Dec 1;129(11):1209-12
Date
Dec-1-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology
Adult
Bacterial Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology
Emigration and Immigration
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Haiti - ethnology
Humans
Male
Mycoses - diagnosis - epidemiology
Quebec
Toxoplasmosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Virus Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
In Montreal the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) was seen in eight Haitian immigrants and one Caucasian woman who had lived with Haitian immigrants for 3 years before the onset of her illness. AIDS was characterized by opportunistic infections alone in seven patients, by opportunistic infection and Kaposi's sarcoma in one patient and by chronic generalized lymphadenopathy in one patient. Five of the patients had presented with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections 1 to 12 months before the onset of opportunistic infections. All nine patients were found to have recall anergy by skin testing for delayed hypersensitivity. Enumeration of the lymphocyte subpopulations in three patients showed a marked inversion of the ratio of helper to suppressor T lymphocytes. Six of the patients died as a result of the opportunistic infections; autopsies showed no recognizable causes of immunodeficiency. Thus, there is in Montreal a third clustering of AIDS cases in North America related to Haitian immigrants.
Notes
Cites: J Exp Med. 1970 Nov;132(5):1001-184919141
Cites: Clin Chem. 1975 Nov;21(12):1735-461182993
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1981 Nov;14(5):486-917031082
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1983 May 19;308(20):1181-46221192
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1982 Oct;97(4):533-96982014
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1983 Jan 20;308(3):125-96217423
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1983 Mar;98(3):277-846299151
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1982 Jul 15;307(3):162-56806657
PubMed ID
6640458 View in PubMed
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Level of suspicion of pulmonary tuberculosis over a 4-year period in a teaching hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202564
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1999 Mar;20(3):158-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
A C Labbé
K. Weiss
M. Laverdiere
L. Poirer
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1999 Mar;20(3):158-60
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross Infection - diagnosis - prevention & control
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Infection Control - standards
Quebec
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - diagnosis - prevention & control
Notes
Comment On: Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1996 Jul;17(7):412-88839797
PubMed ID
10100538 View in PubMed
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Prevalence and antifungal susceptibility of 442 Candida isolates from blood and other normally sterile sites: results of a 2-year (1996 to 1998) multicenter surveillance study in Quebec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195536
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2001 Mar;39(3):949-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
G. St-Germain
M. Laverdière
R. Pelletier
A M Bourgault
M. Libman
C. Lemieux
G. Noël
Author Affiliation
Laboratoire de Santé Publique du Québec, Institut National de Santé Publique, 20045 Chemin Sainte-Marie, Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Québec H9X 3R5, Canada. ggermain@lspq.org
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2001 Mar;39(3):949-53
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amphotericin B - pharmacology
Antifungal Agents - pharmacology
Blood - microbiology
Candida - classification - drug effects - isolation & purification
Candidiasis - epidemiology - microbiology
Cross Infection - epidemiology - microbiology
Flucytosine - pharmacology
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Abstract
During a 2-year surveillance program (1996 to 1998) in Quebec, Canada, 442 strains of Candida species were isolated from 415 patients in 51 hospitals. The distribution of species was as follows: Candida albicans, 54%; C. glabrata, 15%; C. parapsilosis, 12%; C. tropicalis, 9%; C. lusitaniae, 3%; C. krusei, 3%; and Candida spp., 3%. These data, compared to those of a 1985 survey, indicate variations in species distribution, with the proportions of C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis increasing by 9 and 4%, respectively, and those of C. albicans and C. tropicalis decreasing by 10 and 7%, respectively. However, these differences are statistically significant for C. glabrata and C. tropicalis only. MICs of amphotericin B were > or =4 microg/ml for 3% of isolates, all of which were non-C. albicans species. Three percent of C. albicans isolates were resistant to flucytosine (> or =32 microg/ml). Resistance to itraconazole (> or =1 microg/ml) and fluconazole (> or =64 microg/ml) was observed, respectively, in 1 and 1% of C. albicans, 14 and 9% of C. glabrata, 5 and 0% of C. tropicalis, and 0% of C. parapsilosis and C. lusitaniae isolates. Clinical data were obtained for 343 patients. The overall crude mortality rate was 38%, reflecting the multiple serious underlying illnesses found in these patients. Bloodstream infections were documented for 249 patients (73%). Overall, systemic triazoles had been administered to 10% of patients before the onset of candidiasis. The frequency of isolation of non-C. albicans species was significantly higher in this group of patients. Overall, only two C. albicans isolates were found to be resistant to fluconazole. These were obtained from an AIDS patient and a leukemia patient, both of whom had a history of previous exposure to fluconazole. At present, it appears that resistance to fluconazole in Quebec is rare and is restricted to patients with prior prolonged azole treatment.
Notes
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2000 Mar;44(3):747-5110681349
Cites: Clin Microbiol Rev. 1999 Jan;12(1):80-969880475
Cites: Rev Infect Dis. 1987 Sep-Oct;9(5):1006-123317728
Cites: Medicine (Baltimore). 1993 May;72(3):143-508502167
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1995 Jan;39(1):1-87695288
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1995 Apr;39(4):906-97785993
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1995 May;33(5):1094-77615712
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 1995 Jun;20(6):1526-307548503
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1995 Dec 11-25;155(22):2429-357503601
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 1995 Oct;21(4):994-68645855
Cites: Am J Med. 1996 Jun;100(6):617-238678081
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1997 Jun;35(6):1473-69163465
Cites: CMAJ. 1999 Feb 23;160(4):493-910081465
Cites: Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 1999 Apr;33(4):217-2210212747
Cites: Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 1999 Jul;34(3):213-2010403101
Cites: Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 1999 Aug;34(4):281-610459478
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 1999 Nov;29(5):1164-7010524958
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 1997 Jun;24(6):1122-89195068
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 1997 Jul;25(1):43-599243032
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1998 Jan;36(1):153-69431939
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1998 Jan;42(1):129-349449272
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1998 Feb;177(2):425-309466531
Cites: Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 1998 May;31(1):289-969597389
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1998 Dec;36(12):3455-99817853
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1999 Jan;37(1):141-59854079
Cites: Mycoses. 2001;44(1-2):37-4511398639
PubMed ID
11230409 View in PubMed
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Pseudomonas aeruginosa septicemia related to structural damage to hemodialyzer membranes following disinfection with monoxychlorosene--Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103161
Source
Can Dis Wkly Rep. 1990 Feb 10;16(6):27-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-1990

[Rubella immunity among a group of pregnant women of the Montreal region: implications for vaccination].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254666
Source
Union Med Can. 1973 May;102(5):1104-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1973

Serogroups and serotypes of pneumococci in Montreal: correlations with age, outcome and indications for vaccination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240705
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Mar 15;130(6):737-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1984
Author
F. Lamothe
G. Delage
M. Laverdière
P. Saint-Antoine
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Mar 15;130(6):737-40
Date
Mar-15-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Aged
Bacterial Vaccines
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Infant
Middle Aged
Pneumococcal Infections - microbiology - mortality - prevention & control
Quebec
Streptococcus pneumoniae - classification - immunology - isolation & purification
Vaccination
Abstract
The serogroups or serotypes of 262 pneumococcal isolates obtained from the blood and other body fluids of 260 patients in the Montreal area during a 3-year period were determined. The distribution of the 30 different serogroups detected was generally similar to what has been reported in other Canadian provinces and in the United States. However, the distributions in pediatric patients (less than 18 years old) and adults were significantly different (p less than 0.001). Serogroup 15 was relatively frequent in the adults. In the pediatric patients 88% and 91% of the 150 isolates were related to the 14-valent and the new 23-valent vaccines respectively. In the adults the comparable proportions were 70% and 89% of the 112 isolates. The mortality rate was 6% in the pediatric patients and 41% in the adults. Previous use of pneumococcal vaccine in the pediatric patients would have prevented only one death because most were less than 2 years old or did not have conditions regarded as indications for vaccination. Such underlying diseases were found in 58% of the adults, though. The mortality rate was 26% in the adults who were less than 65 years of age and were without these underlying conditions but rose to 65% in older patients; the difference was statistically significant (p less than 0.02).
Notes
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1982 Feb;96(2):208-206800290
Cites: Rev Infect Dis. 1981 Mar-Apr;3 Suppl:S71-817280449
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1981 Aug 1;125(3):263-77272879
Cites: Infect Immun. 1979 Dec;26(3):1116-2243290
Cites: Pediatrics. 1979 Sep;64(3):296-30039285
Cites: Pediatrics. 1978 Nov;62(5):721-731592
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1978 Oct;8(4):355-931369
Cites: J Pediatr. 1978 Aug;93(2):249-5027600
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1977 Oct 27;297(17):938-920576
Cites: Trans Assoc Am Physicians. 1976;89:184-9414433
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1974 Sep;134(3):505-104152800
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1983 Dec;148(6):1136-596361173
Cites: Infect Immun. 1982 Mar;35(3):777-827068216
Cites: Infect Immun. 1982 Jun;36(3):1261-27095850
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1964 May;60:759-7614156606
Cites: Am J Med. 1983 Aug;75(2):199-2056881171
Cites: JAMA. 1982 Sep 24;248(12):1486-97109171
PubMed ID
6697283 View in PubMed
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Sporadic Legionnaires' disease: the role of domestic electric hot-water tanks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136263
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2012 Jan;140(1):172-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
S F Dufresne
M C Locas
A. Duchesne
C. Restieri
J. Ismaïl
B. Lefebvre
A C Labbé
R. Dion
M. Plante
M. Laverdière
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology - Infectious Diseases, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, 5415 L'Assomption Boulevard, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2012 Jan;140(1):172-81
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Community-Acquired Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks
Drinking Water - microbiology
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Female
Humans
Legionella pneumophila - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Legionnaires' Disease - epidemiology - microbiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Quebec - epidemiology
Seasons
Temperature
Water Supply - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Sporadic community-acquired legionellosis (SCAL) can be acquired through contaminated aerosols from residential potable water. Electricity-dependent hot-water tanks are widely used in the province of Quebec (Canada) and have been shown to be frequently contaminated with Legionella spp. We prospectively investigated the homes of culture-proven SCAL patients from Quebec in order to establish the proportion of patients whose domestic potable hot-water system was contaminated with the same Legionella isolate that caused their pneumonia. Water samples were collected in each patient's home. Environmental and clinical isolates were compared using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Thirty-six patients were enrolled into the study. Legionella was recovered in 12/36 (33%) homes. The residential and clinical isolates were found to be microbiologically related in 5/36 (14%) patients. Contaminated electricity-heated domestic hot-water systems contribute to the acquisition of SCAL. The proportion is similar to previous reports, but may be underestimated.
PubMed ID
21396146 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.