Skip header and navigation

Refine By

144 records – page 1 of 15.

Absence of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies in childhood epilepsies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33038
Source
Pediatr Neurol. 1999 Nov;21(5):794-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
H. Rantala
P. Kulmala
K. Savola
M. Knip
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Pediatr Neurol. 1999 Nov;21(5):794-6
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Child
Child, Preschool
Epilepsy - diagnosis - enzymology
Female
Glutamate Decarboxylase - blood - immunology
Humans
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies are present in some patients with therapy-resistant epilepsy. The authors measured glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies in an unselected population of 114 children with different types of epilepsy. Three children with temporal lobe epilepsy and six children with various other types of epilepsy had intractable epilepsy. None of the children tested positive for glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies. The study suggests that glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody testing cannot be recommended in unselected cases of childhood epilepsy.
PubMed ID
10593668 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accelerated pubertal development in patients with shunted hydrocephalus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34773
Source
Arch Dis Child. 1996 Jun;74(6):490-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
T. Löppönen
A L Saukkonen
W. Serlo
P. Tapanainen
A. Ruokonen
M. Knip
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Arch Dis Child. 1996 Jun;74(6):490-6
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Breast - growth & development
Cerebrospinal Fluid Shunts
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood
Gonadotropins, Pituitary - blood
Humans
Hydrocephalus - complications - physiopathology - surgery
Male
Menarche - physiology
Puberty - physiology
Puberty, Precocious - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Testis - growth & development
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate pubertal development and peripheral concentrations of gonadotrophins and sex hormones in children with shunted hydrocephalus compared with healthy controls. STUDY DESIGN: 114 patients (52 females, 62 males) and 73 healthy controls (35 females, 38 males) aged 5 to 20 years were analysed for stage of puberty, age at menarche, testicular volume, basal serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinising hormone (LH), sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), testosterone and oestradiol concentrations, and free androgen index. RESULTS: Male gonadal and male and female pubic hair development occurred significantly earlier in the patients than in the controls. The mean age at menarche was significantly lower in the female patients than in their controls (11.7 v 13.2 years; p
PubMed ID
8758123 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adrenal steroidogenesis is related to insulin in hyperandrogenic women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211012
Source
Fertil Steril. 1996 Oct;66(4):564-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
H. Martikainen
P. Salmela
S. Nuojua-Huttunen
J. Perälä
S. Leinonen
M. Knip
A. Ruokonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Central Hospital of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Fertil Steril. 1996 Oct;66(4):564-70
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenal Glands - metabolism
Adrenocorticotropic Hormone - pharmacology
Adult
Androgens - biosynthesis
Dexamethasone - pharmacology
Female
Humans
Hydrocortisone - biosynthesis
Hyperandrogenism - metabolism
Insulin - blood
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Abstract
To evaluate ovarian and adrenal steroid secretion in women with severe hyperandrogenism.
A prospective study.
The Gynecological Endocrine Research Unit of the University Central Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
Thirteen obese, hirsute women with severe hyperandrogenism.
Adrenocorticotropin hormone stimulation and dexamethasone suppression tests and selective catheterizations of the left ovarian and adrenal veins were performed.
The concentrations of insulin, P, 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP), androstenedione (A), T, DHEA, DHEAS, and cortisol were measured.
The secretory gradients of T and its precursors, P, 17-OHP, A, and DHEA in the selective catheterizations showed the adrenal to be the main source of excessive steroid production in these patients. The concentrations of P (r = 0.82), 17-OHP (r = 0.89), A (r = 0.84), T (r = 0.86), and cortisol (r = 0.87) in the adrenal vein showed a strong correlation with insulin measured from the same samples.
Excessive androgens were secreted mainly by the adrenals in these obese hyperinsulinemic women. Correlation analyses suggested that insulin stimulates adrenal androgen and cortisol secretion, which may constitute an important component of the pathogenetic mechanisms of hyperandrogenism and the polycystic ovary syndrome.
PubMed ID
8816617 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aetiology of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus--a cornucopia for research?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225597
Source
Ann Med. 1991 Oct;23(4):415-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1991
Author
H K Akerblom
M. Knip
Author Affiliation
Children's Hospital II, Department of Pediatrics, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Ann Med. 1991 Oct;23(4):415-7
Date
Oct-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Autoimmune Diseases
Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology - etiology
Environmental Exposure
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Registries
Research
PubMed ID
1930938 View in PubMed
Less detail

Allergic sensitization and microbial load--a comparison between Finland and Russian Karelia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165130
Source
Clin Exp Immunol. 2007 Apr;148(1):47-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
T. Seiskari
A. Kondrashova
H. Viskari
M. Kaila
A-M Haapala
J. Aittoniemi
M. Virta
M. Hurme
R. Uibo
M. Knip
H. Hyöty
Author Affiliation
Department of Virology, University of Tampere, Finland. tapio.seiskari@uta.fi
Source
Clin Exp Immunol. 2007 Apr;148(1):47-52
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Allergens - immunology
Animals
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Antibodies, Protozoan - blood
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Bacteria - isolation & purification
Betula - immunology
Cats - immunology
Child
Enterovirus B, Human - immunology - isolation & purification
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Helicobacter pylori - immunology - isolation & purification
Hepatitis A virus - immunology - isolation & purification
Humans
Hypersensitivity - ethnology - immunology - microbiology
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Male
Ovalbumin - immunology
Pollen - immunology
Russia - epidemiology
Toxoplasma - immunology - isolation & purification
Viruses - isolation & purification
Abstract
Epidemiological data have indicated that some infections are associated with a low risk of allergic diseases, thus supporting the idea (hygiene hypothesis) that the microbial load is an important environmental factor conferring protection against the development of allergies. We set out to test the hygiene hypothesis in a unique epidemiological setting in two socio-economically and culturally markedly different, although genetically related, populations living in geographically adjacent areas. The study cohorts included 266 schoolchildren from the Karelian Republic in Russia and 266 schoolchildren from Finland. The levels of total IgE and allergen-specific IgE for birch, cat and egg albumen were measured. Microbial antibodies were analysed against enteroviruses (coxsackievirus B4), hepatitis A virus, Helicobacter pylori and Toxoplasma gondii. Although total IgE level was higher in Russian Karelian children compared to their Finnish peers, the prevalence of allergen-specific IgE was lower among Russian Karelian children. The prevalence of microbial antibodies was, in turn, significantly more frequent in the Karelian children, reflecting the conspicuous difference in socio-economic background factors. Microbial infections were associated with lower risk of allergic sensitization in Russian Karelian children, enterovirus showing the strongest protective effect in a multivariate model. The present findings support the idea that exposure to certain infections, particularly in childhood, may protect from the development of atopy. Enterovirus infections represent a new candidate to the list of markers of such a protective environment. However, possible causal relationship needs to be confirmed in further studies.
Notes
Cites: BMJ. 1989 Nov 18;299(6710):1259-602513902
Cites: BMJ. 2004 May 22;328(7450):122315121716
Cites: Immunol Today. 1996 Mar;17(3):138-468820272
Cites: BMJ. 1997 Apr 5;314(7086):999-10039112843
Cites: Clin Exp Allergy. 1997 Aug;27(8):886-929291284
Cites: BMJ. 1997 Sep 20;315(7110):717-219314757
Cites: Eur Respir J. 1998 Aug;12(2):432-79727797
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1999 Jan;103(1 Pt 1):125-389893196
Cites: Ann Med. 2005;37(1):67-7215902849
Cites: Diabetologia. 2005 Jul;48(7):1280-715902401
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2006 Jan;117(1):151-716387599
Cites: Allergy. 1999 Nov;54(11):1194-810604556
Cites: Clin Exp Allergy. 2000 Feb;30(2):194-20010651771
Cites: Clin Exp Allergy. 2000 Feb;30(2):201-810651772
Cites: BMJ. 2000 Feb 12;320(7232):412-710669445
Cites: Lancet. 2000 May 13;355(9216):1680-310905243
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2000 Aug;106(2):247-5210932066
Cites: Thorax. 2000 Aug;55 Suppl 1:S2-1010943631
Cites: Allergy. 2000 Aug;55(8):767-7210955704
Cites: Clin Exp Allergy. 2000 Sep;30(9):1230-410971468
Cites: Clin Exp Immunol. 2000 Oct;122(1):16-911012612
Cites: JAMA. 2000 Oct 4;284(13):1652-311015794
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2002 Mar;56(3):209-1711854343
Cites: Clin Exp Allergy. 2002 Mar;32(3):373-811940066
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2002 Apr;109(4):643-811941314
Cites: Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol. 2001 Oct;1(5):413-911964721
Cites: Thorax. 2002 May;57(5):379-8211978910
Cites: Curr Opin Immunol. 2002 Dec;14(6):771-812413528
Cites: J Med Virol. 2003 Jan;69(1):91-812436483
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2003 Apr;111(4):847-5312704368
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2003 Jun 19;348(25):2517-2412815137
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2003 Sep;112(3):480-7; quiz 48813679803
Cites: Nature. 2003 Oct 9;425(6958):57614534576
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2003 Dec;22(6):956-6114680085
Cites: Allergy. 2004 Apr;59(4):465-615005774
Cites: BMJ. 1992 Apr 4;304(6831):873-51392746
PubMed ID
17302731 View in PubMed
Less detail

Altered ovarian function and cardiovascular risk factors in valproate-treated women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19550
Source
Am J Med. 2001 Sep;111(4):290-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
J I Isojärvi
E. Taubøll
A J Pakarinen
J. van Parys
J. Rättyä
H F Harbo
P O Dale
B C Fauser
L. Gjerstad
R. Koivunen
M. Knip
J S Tapanainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, University of Oulu, FIN-90220 Oulu, Finland.
Source
Am J Med. 2001 Sep;111(4):290-6
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Anticonvulsants - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Carbamazepine - therapeutic use
Cardiovascular Diseases - chemically induced
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Epilepsy - blood - drug therapy
Female
Humans
Hyperandrogenism - blood - chemically induced
Menstruation Disturbances - blood - chemically induced
Obesity - blood
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome - blood - chemically induced
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Valproic Acid - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Abstract
PURPOSE: Polycystic ovaries and menstrual disturbances seem to be common among women taking valproate for epilepsy. The purpose of the present study was to assess the frequency of valproate-related metabolic and endocrine disorders in different groups of women with epilepsy. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Seventy-two women with epilepsy and 52 control subjects from centers in three European countries (Finland, Norway, and the Netherlands) participated in the study. Thirty-seven of the women with epilepsy were taking valproate monotherapy and 35 carbamazepine monotherapy. RESULTS: The frequency of polycystic ovaries or hyperandrogenism, or both, among valproate-treated women with epilepsy was 70% (26 of 37) compared with 19% (10 of 52) among control subjects (P
PubMed ID
11566460 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of an interferon-gamma gene (IFNG) polymorphism in Danish and Finnish insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) patients and control subjects. Danish Study Group of Diabetes in Childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34382
Source
J Interferon Cytokine Res. 1997 Feb;17(2):87-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1997
Author
F. Pociot
R. Veijola
J. Johannesen
P M Hansen
T. Lorenzen
A E Karlsen
H. Reijonen
M. Knip
J. Nerup
Author Affiliation
Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte, Denmark.
Source
J Interferon Cytokine Res. 1997 Feb;17(2):87-93
Date
Feb-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alleles
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - genetics
Finland
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Humans
Interferon Type II - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
A CA-repeat polymorphism within the first intron of the interferon (IFN)-gamma gene was analyzed. This polymorphism was recently demonstrated to be associated with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in Japanese subjects. We typed 266 IDDM patients and 195 control subjects of Danish Caucasoid origin. No significant differences in allele or genotype frequencies between patients and control were observed. In addition, we typed 168 IDDM and 110 control subjects of Finnish origin. A significant disease association of the studied IFN-gamma allelic pattern was found (p = 0.029). Analysis of data according to HLA-DQB1 susceptibility status did not reveal heterogeneity of risk at the IFN-gamma locus in either of the populations. Fifty-five Danish and 94 Finnish IDDM multiplex families with at least two affected siblings (660 individuals) were typed to test for transmission disequilibrium (TDT). No evidence for overall transmission disequilibrium using either an allele-wise (p = 0.42; combined data) or a genotype-wise analysis (p = 0.21; combined data) could be detected. Thus, the modest significance level observed in the Finnish case-control study and the failure to replicate it by the TDT provide little support for the hypothesis that the IFN-gamma gene microsatellite is associated with IDDM.
PubMed ID
9058314 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibodies to GAD65 epitopes at diagnosis and over the first 10 years of clinical type 1 diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30440
Source
Scand J Immunol. 2004 Mar;59(3):334-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
M S Ronkainen
K. Savola
M. Knip
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Scand J Immunol. 2004 Mar;59(3):334-40
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antibodies - immunology
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - enzymology - immunology
Female
Glutamate Decarboxylase - immunology
HLA-DR Antigens - immunology
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Immunodominant Epitopes - immunology
Infant
Insulin - administration & dosage
Isoenzymes - immunology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Antibodies to glutamate decarboxylase (GAD65Ab) may persist, and their titres even increase after the clinical onset of type 1 diabetes. To characterize this phenomenon in detail, we analysed sequentially antibodies to GAD65 epitope clusters in a radio-binding assay in patients with type 1 diabetes. Serum samples were taken at diagnosis and 2, 5 and 10 years later from 50 young patients who had tested positive for GAD65Ab at least once during observation. The levels of GAD65Ab peaked in 21 patients after diagnosis. Antibodies to the middle region of GAD65 (GAD65-M-Ab, 88%) were more common at diagnosis than antibodies to the C-terminal (GAD65-C-Ab, 68%, P
PubMed ID
15030586 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association of the HLA-A*24:02, B*39:01 and B*39:06 alleles with type 1 diabetes is restricted to specific HLA-DR/DQ haplotypes in Finns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292272
Source
HLA. 2017 Apr; 89(4):215-224
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
M-L Mikk
T Heikkinen
M I El-Amir
M Kiviniemi
A-P Laine
T Härkönen
R Veijola
J Toppari
M Knip
J Ilonen
Author Affiliation
Immunogenetics Laboratory, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
Source
HLA. 2017 Apr; 89(4):215-224
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Alleles
Autoantibodies - biosynthesis
Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - diagnosis - genetics - immunology - pathology
Disease Progression
Family
Female
Finland
Gene Expression
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
HLA-A24 Antigen - genetics - immunology
HLA-B39 Antigen - genetics - immunology
HLA-DQ Antigens - genetics - immunology
HLA-DR Antigens - genetics - immunology
Haplotypes
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Linkage Disequilibrium
Male
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Abstract
We analysed the previously reported association of the HLA-A*24:02, B*18 and B*39 alleles with type 1 diabetes and diabetes associated autoimmunity in the Finnish population applying HLA-DR/DQ stratification.
Haplotype transmission was analysed in 2424 nuclear families from the Finnish Paediatric Diabetes Register. Survival analysis was applied to study the development of islet autoantibodies and further progression to clinical diabetes in the prospective follow-up cohort from the Finnish Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention (DIPP) Study. The subjects were genotyped for specific HLA class I alleles by sequence-specific hybridization using lanthanide labelled nucleotide probes.
The HLA-B*39:06 allele was found almost exclusively on the (DR8)-DQB1*04 haplotype in which its presence changed the disease risk status of the whole haplotype from neutral to predisposing. The HLA-A*24:02 and the B*39:01 alleles increased the diabetes-associated risk of the DRB1*04:04-DQA1*03-DQB1*03:02 haplotype but the alleles were in linkage disequilibrium and no independent effect could be detected. Within the DIPP cohort, neither the A*24:02 nor the B*39:01 allele were associated with seroconversion but were in contrast associated with increased progression from seroconversion to clinical disease.
The independent predisposing effect of the HLA-B*39:06 allele with type 1 diabetes was confirmed in the Finnish population but the association of the A*24:02 and B*39:01 alleles remained inconclusive whilst both A*24:02 and B*39:01 affected the progression rate from seroconversion to autoantibody positivity to overt type 1 diabetes.
PubMed ID
28185422 View in PubMed
Less detail

Autoantibodies associated with Type I diabetes mellitus persist after diagnosis in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33585
Source
Diabetologia. 1998 Nov;41(11):1293-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1998
Author
K. Savola
E. Sabbah
P. Kulmala
P. Vähäsalo
J. Ilonen
M. Knip
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Diabetologia. 1998 Nov;41(11):1293-7
Date
Nov-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Autoantibodies - blood
Autoantigens
Biological Markers - blood
Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - immunology
Female
Glutamate Decarboxylase - immunology
Humans
Insulin Antibodies - blood
Islets of Langerhans - immunology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Membrane Proteins - immunology
Protein-Tyrosine-Phosphatase - immunology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Time Factors
Abstract
To study the persistence of Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus associated autoantibodies and their relation to genetic risk markers and clinical characteristics of the disease after clinical manifestation, serum samples were obtained from 90 children and adolescents at diagnosis and 2, 5 and 10 years later. The samples were analysed for islet cell antibodies (ICA) by immunofluorescence and for antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA), intracellular portion of the protein tyrosine phosphatase related IA-2 antigen (IA-2A) and insulin autoantibodies by specific radiobinding assays. Of the subjects tested 79% were positive for IA-2A at diagnosis, 62% for GADA, 81% for ICA and 28% for insulin autoantibodies, but the prevalence of IA-2A, GADA and ICA decreased substantially as a function of increasing duration of the disease (p
PubMed ID
9833935 View in PubMed
Less detail

144 records – page 1 of 15.