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Pancreatitis in Finland between 1970 and 1989.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220330
Source
Gut. 1993 Sep;34(9):1255-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
M. Jaakkola
I. Nordback
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Tampere, Finland.
Source
Gut. 1993 Sep;34(9):1255-60
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Cholelithiasis - complications - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Liver Cirrhosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreatitis - epidemiology - mortality
Sex Factors
Abstract
The incidence and mortality from pancreatitis in Finland between 1970 and 1989 were studied and compared with the alcohol consumption in the country and with the incidence of liver cirrhosis and gall stone disease. Hospital discharge data were obtained from the Finnish National Agency for Welfare and Health, the causes of deaths from the Finnish State Statistics, and annual alcohol consumption from the Finnish State Alcohol Company. There were 56,353 hospital treatment periods because of pancreatitis. The incidence of pancreatitis discharges increased from 46.6 to 73.4/100,000/year. In men it increased from 59.1 to 113.4, but in women it remained unchanged (mean 35.0). The incidence of pancreatitis discharges correlated with the alcohol consumption in Finland (r = 0.78, p = 0.0001). The incidence of pancreatitis discharges correlated in men, but not in women, with the incidence of liver cirrhosis (r = 0.81, p = 0.0001). In women, but not in men, the incidence of pancreatitis discharges correlated with the incidence of gall stone disease discharges (r = 0.77, p = 0.0001). The incidence of discharges due to haemorrhagic pancreatitis and pancreatic abscess doubled in men and remained unchanged in women. Pancreatitis death rate decreased from 5.9% (men 4.8%, women 7.0%) to 2.6% (men 2.4%, women 2.7%).
Notes
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PubMed ID
8406164 View in PubMed
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The presence of the gallbladder is associated with the severity of acute biliary pancreatitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208801
Source
Int J Pancreatol. 1997 Apr;21(2):145-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997
Author
S. Räty
M. Jaakkola
J. Karjalainen
H. Kuivanen
J. Sand
I. Nordback
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Tampere University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Int J Pancreatol. 1997 Apr;21(2):145-8
Date
Apr-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cholecystectomy
Female
Finland
Gallbladder - physiopathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreatitis - complications - etiology - physiopathology
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The presence of the gallbladder at the onset of acute biliary pancreatitis is associated with increased severity of the disease. One possible explanation is that gallbladder contraction might induce bile reflux into the pancreatic duct during the transfer of a gallstone through the ampulla.
In clinical practice there is an impression that the presence of the gallbladder in patients with biliary pancreatitis may be associated with increased severity of the disease, compared to patients who have undergone cholecystectomy.
To test this hypothesis, we studied 266 cases with biliary pancreatitis. Patients were divided into two groups: (A) those who had a gallbladder in situ at the onset of biliary pancreatitis (n = 234, 88%) and (B) those who had undergone previous cholecystectomy (n = 32, 12%).
Pancreatitis was more severe in group A than in group B, according to Glasgow criteria (> or = 3 positive, 66/210 = 31% vs 4/29 = 14%, p = 0.04); development of complications (77/234 = 33% vs 4/32 = 13%, p = 0.01); and mortality (40/234 = 17% vs 1/32 = 3%, p = 0.03). Furthermore, serum C-reactive protein levels on admission were over 150 mg/L twice as often in group A as in group B.
PubMed ID
9209955 View in PubMed
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