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Cross-cultural differences in the reporting of global functional capacity: an example in cataract patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50985
Source
Med Care. 1998 Jun;36(6):868-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
J. Alonso
C. Black
J C Norregaard
E. Dunn
T F Andersen
M. Espallargues
P. Bernth-Petersen
G F Anderson
Author Affiliation
Health Services Research Unit, Institut Municipal d'Investigació Mèdica, Barcelona, Spain.
Source
Med Care. 1998 Jun;36(6):868-78
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Bias (epidemiology)
Cataract - ethnology - physiopathology
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cultural Characteristics
Denmark
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Manitoba
Multivariate Analysis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods - standards
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Spain
United States
Visual acuity
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Patient-based health status measures have an important role to play in the assessment of health care outcomes. Among these measures, global assessments increasingly have been used, although the understanding of the performance of these indicators and the determinants of patients responses is underdeveloped. In this study, the performance of a single-item global indicator of visual function in cataract patients of four international settings was compared. METHODS: Visual acuity and ocular comorbidity was assessed by patients' ophthalmologist using Snellen-type charts in patients referred for a first cataract surgery in the United States, Manitoba (Canada), Denmark, and Barcelona (Spain). Patients also were interviewed by telephone and asked to report overall trouble with vision on a single-item indicator ("great deal," "moderate," "a little," "none") and to complete the Visual Functioning Index (VF-14), a scale of visual function ranging from 0 (worst function) to 100 (best level of function), along with other questions including the degree the patient was bothered by symptoms as measured by the Cataract Symptom Score (CSS). A total of 1,407 patients completed the clinical examination and the preoperative interview. RESULTS: Distribution of overall trouble with vision varied across the sites, with the proportion of patients reporting a great deal of trouble ranging from 21.7% to 37.9%. In all sites, patients reporting more trouble with vision tended to show a poorer age-adjusted and sex-adjusted visual acuity. The proportion of patients reporting great deal of trouble with vision was higher in the groups with worse visual acuity (P
PubMed ID
9630128 View in PubMed
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International applicability of the VF-14. An index of visual function in patients with cataracts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51030
Source
Ophthalmology. 1997 May;104(5):799-807
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
J. Alonso
M. Espallargues
T F Andersen
S D Cassard
E. Dunn
P. Bernth-Petersen
J C Norregaard
C. Black
E P Steinberg
G F Anderson
Author Affiliation
Health Services Research Unit. Institut Municipal d'Investigació Mèdica (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain.
Source
Ophthalmology. 1997 May;104(5):799-807
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cataract - physiopathology
Cataract Extraction
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sickness Impact Profile
Treatment Outcome
Vision Tests - instrumentation
Visual Acuity - physiology
Abstract
PURPOSE: There is increased recognition that a rigorous approach to functional assessment should complement the assessment of clinical status. The authors compare the reliability, validity, and responsiveness to clinical change of a visual function index (VF-14) in non-U.S. and in U.S. patients with cataracts. DESIGN: An observational longitudinal study was performed. PARTICIPANTS: One thousand four hundred seven first eye cataract surgery patients were recruited in four international sites: Manitoba (Canada), Denmark, Barcelona (Spain), and the United States. INTERVENTION: Patients were evaluated before cataract surgery and at a 4-month postoperative follow-up visit. Patients completed the preoperative interview and the clinical examination (766 in the United States, 152 in Manitoba, 291 in Denmark, and 198 in Barcelona), and 91.3% of those (1284) also completed the 4-month postoperative follow-up interview and were evaluated postoperatively by an ophthalmologist. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The authors used the following measures: the visual function index (VF-14), the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP), global measures of patients' trouble and satisfaction with vision, and best-corrected visual acuity (VA) in each eye. RESULTS: The VF-14 showed a high internal consistency reliability level in all sites (Cronbach's alpha coefficients > or = 0.84). Correlation of preoperative visual function index scores with the Vision-Related SIP was strong (r = -0.68 in non-U.S. and r = -0.57 in U.S. patients) and with VA in the eye with better vision was moderate (r = 0.40 and r = 0.27, respectively), the pattern of relationships being very similar among U.S. and non-U.S. patients. In patients with only first-eye surgery who reported that their initial trouble with vision had improved, the amount of change in visual function as assessed by the VF-14 (effect size) was large (1.01 for the non-U.S. patients and 1.17 for the U.S. patients). CONCLUSIONS: The non-U.S. versions of the visual function index (VF-14) analyzed are as reliable, valid, and responsive to clinical change as the original U.S. version. These versions are appropriate for international studies of cataract patients outcomes and possibly in routine clinical practice.
PubMed ID
9160026 View in PubMed
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International variation in anesthesia care during cataract surgery: results from the International Cataract Surgery Outcomes Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207513
Source
Arch Ophthalmol. 1997 Oct;115(10):1304-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1997
Author
J C Nørregaard
O D Schein
L. Bellan
C. Black
J. Alonso
P. Bernth-Petersen
E. Dunn
T F Andersen
M. Espallargues
G F Anderson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Arch Ophthalmol. 1997 Oct;115(10):1304-8
Date
Oct-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesia - economics - methods - standards
Canada
Cataract Extraction
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Denmark
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Monitoring, Intraoperative - methods - standards
Physician's Practice Patterns
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Retrospective Studies
Spain
Treatment Outcome
United States
Abstract
To describe international variation in anesthesia care and monitoring during cataract surgery and to discuss its implications for cost and safety.
A standardized questionnaire was sent to random samples of ophthalmologists in the United States, Canada, and Barcelona, Spain, and to all ophthalmologists in Denmark. The survey was conducted in 1993 and 1994. Certified ophthalmologists who had performed 1 or more cataract extractions in the previous year were eligible for enrollment.
The response rates were 62% in the United States (n=148), 67% in Canada (n=276), 70% in Barcelona (n=89), and 80% in Denmark (n=82). The anesthetic technique for cataract surgery varied significantly between sites (P
PubMed ID
9338678 View in PubMed
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International variation in ophthalmologic management of patients with cataracts. Results from the International Cataract Surgery Outcomes Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72764
Source
Arch Ophthalmol. 1997 Mar;115(3):399-403
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
J C Norregaard
O D Schein
G F Anderson
J. Alonso
E. Dunn
C. Black
T F Andersen
P. Bernth-Petersen
L. Bellan
M. Espallargues
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Arch Ophthalmol. 1997 Mar;115(3):399-403
Date
Mar-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cataract - complications - therapy
Cataract Extraction - methods - statistics & numerical data
Comparative Study
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ophthalmology - statistics & numerical data - trends
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data - trends
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Spain
Treatment Outcome
United States
World Health
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To describe international variation in the management of patients with cataacts in 4 health care systems and to discuss the potential implications for cost and utilization of services. DESIGN: To characterize current clinical practice on patients with no coexisting medical or ocular conditions, a standardized questionnaire was sent to random samples of ophthalmologists in the United States (response rate, 82.5%), Canada (66.9%), and Barcelona, Spain (70.4%), and to all ophthalmologists in Denmark (80.1%). From the United States, 526 ophthalmologists who performed cataract surgery participated in the study; there were 276 from Canada, 89 from Barcelona, and 82 from Denmark. RESULTS: Although in all 4 sites most surgeons reported that they performed A-scanning, fundus examination, and refraction routinely before surgery, significant crossnational variation was observed in preoperative ophthalmic and medical testing. While preoperative medical tests were virtually unused in Denmark, they were widely used in the other sites. A significantly higher proportion of the surgeons in the United States and Barcelona reported that they performed less than 100 extractions per year compared with surgeons in Canada and Denmark (P
PubMed ID
9076214 View in PubMed
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Variation in indications for cataract surgery in the United States, Denmark, Canada, and Spain: results from the International Cataract Surgery Outcomes Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50950
Source
Br J Ophthalmol. 1998 Oct;82(10):1107-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
J C Norregaard
P. Bernth-Petersen
J. Alonso
E. Dunn
C. Black
T F Andersen
M. Espallargues
L. Bellan
G F Anderson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Br J Ophthalmol. 1998 Oct;82(10):1107-11
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Cataract - physiopathology
Cataract Extraction - standards - utilization
Denmark
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Selection
Preoperative Care
Prospective Studies
Self Disclosure
Spain
Treatment Outcome
United States
Vision Disorders - physiopathology
Visual Acuity - physiology
Waiting Lists
Abstract
BACKGROUND/AIMS: International comparisons of clinical practice may help in assessing the magnitude and possible causes of variation in cross national healthcare utilisation. With this aim, the indications for cataract surgery in the United States, Denmark, the province of Manitoba (Canada), and the city of Barcelona (Spain) were compared. METHODS: In a prospective multicentre study, patients scheduled for first eye cataract surgery and aged 50 years or older were enrolled consecutively. From the United States 766 patients were enrolled; from Denmark 291; from Manitoba 152; and from Barcelona 200. Indication for surgery was measured as preoperative visual status of patients enlisted for cataract surgery. Main variables were preoperative visual acuity in operative eye, the VF-14 score (an index of functional impairment in patients with cataract) and ocular comorbidity. RESULTS: Mean visual acuity were 0.23 (USA), 0.17 (Denmark), 0.15 (Manitoba), and 0.07 (Barcelona) (p 0.05). Mean VF-14 scores were 76 (USA), 76 (Denmark), 71 (Manitoba), and 64 (Barcelona) (p
Notes
Comment In: Br J Ophthalmol. 1998 Oct;82(10):1101-29924291
PubMed ID
9924294 View in PubMed
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Visual outcomes of cataract surgery in the United States, Canada, Denmark, and Spain. Report From the International Cataract Surgery Outcomes Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50972
Source
Arch Ophthalmol. 1998 Aug;116(8):1095-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1998
Author
J C Norregaard
C. Hindsberger
J. Alonso
L. Bellan
P. Bernth-Petersen
C. Black
E. Dunn
T F Andersen
M. Espallargues
G F Anderson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Arch Ophthalmol. 1998 Aug;116(8):1095-100
Date
Aug-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cataract - physiopathology
Cataract Extraction - statistics & numerical data
Comparative Study
Europe
Female
Health Care Surveys - statistics & numerical data
Humans
International Cooperation
Male
Middle Aged
North America
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Treatment Outcome
Vision - physiology
Visual Acuity - physiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare visual outcomes obtained following cataract surgery in 4 sites in North America and Europe where considerable differences in the organization of care and patterns of clinical practice have been previously described. METHODS: Patients scheduled for first eye-cataract surgery and aged 50 years or older were enrolled consecutively in a prospective multicenter study that collected clinical and patient interview data preoperatively and postoperatively. From the United States, 772 patients were enrolled; from the Province of Manitoba (Canada), 159; from Denmark, 291; and from the City of Barcelona (Spain), 200. Preoperative and 4-month postoperative visual acuity was obtained for 92% of the patients (n = 1291). RESULTS: The mean 4-month postoperative visual acuity of eyes operated on varied significantly across the 4 sites (P
PubMed ID
9715691 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.