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Assessing discomfort after anaesthesia: should you ask the patient or read the record?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217550
Source
Qual Health Care. 1994 Sep;3(3):137-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
M M Cohen
P G Duncan
D P DeBoer
Author Affiliation
Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, North York, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Qual Health Care. 1994 Sep;3(3):137-41
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anesthesia - adverse effects - standards
Canada
Female
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Incidence
Male
Medical Records - standards - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Nausea - chemically induced - epidemiology
Patient satisfaction
Postoperative Period
Prospective Studies
Quality Assurance, Health Care - organization & administration
Vomiting - chemically induced - epidemiology
Abstract
To assess the quality of anaesthesia care from the patients' viewpoint compared with the hospital record.
Prospective study during 1988-9.
Four teaching hospitals (A-D) in Canada.
15,960 inpatients receiving anaesthetic requiring at least an overnight stay, for whom an interview and review of hospital records within 72 hours of surgery were complete.
Rates of postoperative symptoms of discomfort (nausea or vomiting, headache, back pain, sore throat, eye symptoms, and tingling) according to the hospital record versus interview and the relation between symptoms and patients' satisfaction with the anaesthetic experience.
The preparation of completed interviews ranged from 31.0% to 72.7%, owing mainly to patients discharge (hospitals A and B) and severity of illness (C and D). Interviewed patients were similar to all inpatients in the hospitals but were younger and healthier and more had had effective operations and were general surgical than cardiovascular or neurosurgical patients. In all, 26% to 46% of patients at the four hospitals reported at least one symptom of discomfort. Agreement between interviews and hospital records was low, symptoms being more commonly reported by interview than in the record (for example, headache was reported for 5.8%-17% of patients compared with 0.3%-3.0% in hospital records). After controlling for case mix patients who reported at least one symptom were 2.91 times (95% confidence interval 1.89 to 4.50) more likely to be dissatisfied with their anaesthetic care than patients who did not.
Anaesthesia services are typically neglected in studies of hospital quality, yet patients express considerable anxiety about anaesthetic care. Monitoring and recording patients' discomfort clearly need to be improved if the quality of anaesthesia is to be properly evaluated.
Notes
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Cites: Anesthesiology. 1993 Mar;78(3):417-228457042
Cites: Anesth Analg. 1994 Jan;78(1):7-168267183
PubMed ID
10139410 View in PubMed
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Assessing physicians' compliance with guidelines for Papanicolaou testing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223703
Source
Med Care. 1992 Jun;30(6):514-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1992
Author
M M Cohen
N P Roos
L. MacWilliam
A. Wajda
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
Med Care. 1992 Jun;30(6):514-28
Date
Jun-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cooperative Behavior
Fees, Medical
Female
Health Services Research
Humans
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Papanicolaou test
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Physicians - psychology
Primary Health Care - standards
Research Design
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - prevention & control
Vaginal Smears - economics
Abstract
In this study, population-based data were used to examine the appropriateness of Papanicolaou (Pap) testing from the perspective of the women being tested and their physicians. The approach used is unique in its assessment of overtesting and undertesting in the primary care setting. From the data base of the province of Manitoba's universal health insurance plan, 4-year health histories (1981 to 1984) were constructed for each woman from a random sample of the population of women who, in 1982, were between the ages of 25 to 64 years (n = 22,287). At the last visit to a general practitioner, gynecologist, or general surgeon in 1984 (termed the current visit), the authors determined whether a Pap test was given for each woman. Using decision rules from a Canadian task force report on cervical screening and previous health history, the authors evaluated the appropriateness of screening by determining whether a Pap test was given and was needed, or whether a women who had not received a Pap test required one. Overall, 55.7% of women were tested appropriately. Of the 5352 women who received a Pap test at the current visit, 62.8% were overtested. Of the 16,935 women not tested at the current visit, 38.5% required screening (i.e. were undertested). Characteristics of a physician's practice that were significantly related to compliance with the guidelines included having a high proportion of patients visiting for obstetric or gynecologic reasons. Variables that were associated with negative compliance were 1) being a gynecologist; and 2) having a high proportion of patients who lived in inner city or rural areas. Because physicians are paid a fee for every Pap smear taken and the guidelines were well disseminated, these results should be reasonably representative of fee-for-service practice in North America, where preventive care is not subject to user charges. This study supports previous findings that a passive approach to dissemination of guidelines is insufficient to effect practice.
PubMed ID
1593917 View in PubMed
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Assessing the extent of contamination in the Canadian National Breast Screening Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204148
Source
Am J Prev Med. 1998 Oct;15(3):206-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
V. Goel
M M Cohen
P. Kaufert
L. MacWilliam
Author Affiliation
Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, North York, Ontario.
Source
Am J Prev Med. 1998 Oct;15(3):206-11
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control
Clinical Trials as Topic
Female
Humans
Manitoba
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Treatment Refusal
Abstract
To estimate the proportion of Canadian National Breast Screening Study (NBSS) participants who went outside the trial for a mammogram, based on health insurance claims data.
Prospective cohort study linking trial subjects with population-based administrative data.
All NBSS participants enrolled in the Winnipeg screening center who had health insurance claims to Manitoba Health (n = 9,780).
Claims for bilateral mammograms were compared by screening arm allocation and age group at enrollment. Mammograms likely to be "screening" were defined based on prior claim history.
For women aged 40 to 49 at enrollment, 5.3% in the intervention group and 21.8% in the control group had a claim for at least one bilateral mammogram. After excluding nonscreening mammograms these proportions fell to 2.2% and 14.1% (P
PubMed ID
9791638 View in PubMed
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The association between length of stay in Canada and intimate partner violence among immigrant women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170482
Source
Am J Public Health. 2006 Apr;96(4):654-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Ilene Hyman
Tonia Forte
Janice Du Mont
Sarah Romans
Marsha M Cohen
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research in Women's Health, 790 Bay St, 7th Fl, Toronto, ON, Canada. ilene.hyman@sw.ca
Source
Am J Public Health. 2006 Apr;96(4):654-9
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Continental Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Socioeconomic Factors
Spouse Abuse - ethnology
Abstract
We examined the prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV) among recent (0-9 years) and nonrecent (>/= 10 years) immigrant women in Canada to determine whether differences in IPV were associated with length of stay in Canada.
We analyzed data from the 1999 General Social Survey, a national cross-sectional telephone survey. We used weighted logistic regression analysis to examine the effect of length of stay in Canada on IPV and controlled for socio-cultural and other factors associated with IPV.
The crude prevalence of IPV was similar among recent and nonrecent immigrant women. However, after adjustment, the risk for IPV was significantly lower among recent immigrant women compared with nonrecent immigrant women. Country of origin, age, marital status, and having an activity limitation (physical/mental disability or health problem) also were associated with a higher risk for IPV.
Our findings have important implications for both prevention and detection of IPV among immigrant women.
Notes
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2000 Nov;19(4):302-711064235
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2000 Nov;19(4):321-411064238
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2000 Sep-Oct;91(5):357-6011089289
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2001 Mar;91(3):441-511236411
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2002 Nov;55(9):1589-60212297245
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2002 Oct;187(4):1002-712388996
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2005 Oct;59(10):834-916166354
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2004 Jun;58(6):523-715143123
Cites: Am Psychol. 1991 Jun;46(6):585-971952420
Cites: JAMA. 1996 Jun 26;275(24):1915-208648873
Cites: Health Rep. 1996 Spring;7(4):33-45, 37-508679956
Cites: J Consult Clin Psychol. 1997 Feb;65(1):68-789103736
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 2003 Oct;27(5):543-5014651403
PubMed ID
16507740 View in PubMed
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Association of perforation of the appendix with female tubal infertility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195326
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Mar 15;153(6):566-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-2001
Author
D R Urbach
L D Marrett
R. Kung
M M Cohen
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. david.urbach@uhn.on.ca
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Mar 15;153(6):566-71
Date
Mar-15-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bias (epidemiology)
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Humans
Infertility, Female - epidemiology - etiology
Intestinal Perforation - complications - epidemiology
Logistic Models
Ontario - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
Although perforation of the appendix is considered a risk factor for female tubal infertility, the epidemiologic evidence supporting this relation is inconsistent. Risk factors for tubal infertility were compared for 121 women with documented primary tubal infertility attending in vitro fertilization clinics in Toronto, Canada, from July to December 1998 and 490 controls who were pregnant during the same time period. Self-administered questionnaires and review of medical records were used to assess exposures. The authors found that neither history of acute appendicitis nor perforation of the appendix was a statistically significant risk factor for tubal infertility. The crude odds ratio for perforated appendicitis was 3.4 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.9, 12.9), and the adjusted odds ratio was 1.4 (95% CI: 0.3, 6.2). In addition to increased age and annual income, cigarette smoking (odds ratio (OR) = 2.0, 95% CI: 1.2, 3.2), history of endometriosis (OR = 6.0, 95% CI: 2.8,12.8), and history of pelvic inflammatory disease (OR = 6.0, 95% CI: 2.8, 12.8) were significantly associated with tubal infertility in multivariate analysis. These data do not provide substantial evidence that perforation of the appendix is an important risk factor for female tubal infertility.
PubMed ID
11257064 View in PubMed
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Birth prevalence study of the Apert syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59635
Source
Am J Med Genet. 1992 Mar 1;42(5):655-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-1992
Author
M M Cohen
S. Kreiborg
E J Lammer
J F Cordero
P. Mastroiacovo
J D Erickson
P. Roeper
M L Martínez-Frías
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Biology, Faculty of Dentistry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
Am J Med Genet. 1992 Mar 1;42(5):655-9
Date
Mar-1-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrocephalosyndactylia - epidemiology
California - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Georgia - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Italy - epidemiology
Mutation - genetics
Nebraska - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Spain - epidemiology
Washington - epidemiology
Abstract
Estimates of the Apert syndrome birth prevalence and the mutation rate are reported for Washington State, Nebraska, Denmark, Italy, Spain, Atlanta, and Northern California. Data were pooled to increase the number of Apert births (n = 57) and produce a more stable birth prevalence estimate. Birth prevalence of the Apert syndrome was calculated to be approximately 15.5/1,000,000 births, which is twice the rate determined in earlier studies. The major reason appears to be incomplete ascertainment in the earlier studies. The similarity of the point estimates and the narrow bounds of the confidence limits in the present study suggest that the birth prevalence of the Apert syndrome over different populations is fairly uniform. The mutation rate was calculated to be 7.8 x 10(-6) per gene per generation. Apert syndrome accounts for about 4.5% of all cases of craniosynostosis. The mortality rate appears to be increased compared to that experienced in the general population; however, further study of the problem is necessary.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Med Genet. 1993 Feb 1;45(3):392-38434630
PubMed ID
1303629 View in PubMed
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The Canadian four-centre study of anaesthetic outcomes: I. Description of methods and populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223931
Source
Can J Anaesth. 1992 May;39(5 Pt 1):420-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992
Author
M M Cohen
P G Duncan
W A Tweed
D. Biehl
W D Pope
M. Perry
R N Merchant
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesia, University of Saskatchewan, Canada.
Source
Can J Anaesth. 1992 May;39(5 Pt 1):420-9
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesia - adverse effects - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Anesthesia, General - statistics & numerical data
Anesthesia, Inhalation - statistics & numerical data
Anesthetics - administration & dosage
Canada - epidemiology
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Disease
Female
Hospital records
Humans
Male
Medical Audit
Monitoring, Intraoperative - statistics & numerical data
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Research Design
Surgical Procedures, Operative
Abstract
The objectives of this study were first to develop and institute a methodology for the study of anaesthetic outcome for parallel use in four teaching hospitals in Canada and second, to compare rates of morbidity and mortality associated with anaesthesia between the four centres. The basic design of the study was occurrence screening with anaesthetists entering data on patient demographics, anaesthetic and surgical factors. Research nurses reviewed anaesthetic records and hospital charts and interviewed patients postoperatively. Data on 37,665 anaesthetics were collected during 1988-89 in the four teaching centres. There were major differences found across the hospitals, particularly with regard to volume, patient case-mix, anaesthetic drugs and monitoring used. The use of parallel training, repeated consultations and use of rounds and inservices contributed to the reliability and validity of the data collection. We conclude that outcome surveillance can be instituted in different hospital Departments of Anaesthesia with sufficient confidence to form the basis of comparison of anaesthetic outcome.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Anaesth. 1993 Jan;40(1):79-818425250
PubMed ID
1308755 View in PubMed
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The Canadian four-centre study of anaesthetic outcomes: II. Can outcomes be used to assess the quality of anaesthesia care?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223845
Source
Can J Anaesth. 1992 May;39(5 Pt 1):430-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992
Author
M M Cohen
P G Duncan
W D Pope
D. Biehl
W A Tweed
L. MacWilliam
R N Merchant
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesia, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
Can J Anaesth. 1992 May;39(5 Pt 1):430-9
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesia - adverse effects - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Anesthesia Recovery Period
Anesthetics - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Cerebrovascular Disorders - epidemiology
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Female
Heart Arrest - epidemiology
Hospital Units - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Intensive Care - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Intraoperative - statistics & numerical data
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Postoperative Care - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Health Care
Time Factors
Abstract
Since anaesthesia, unlike medical or surgical specialties, does not constitute treatment, this study sought to determine if methods used to assess medical or surgical outcomes (that is the determination of adverse outcome) are applicable to anaesthesia. Anaesthetists collected information on patient, surgical and anaesthetic factors while data on recovery room and postoperative events were evaluated by research nurses. Data on 27,184 inpatients were collected and the analysis of outcomes determined for the intraoperative, post-anaesthetic care unit and postoperative time periods. Logistic regression was used to control for differences in patient populations across the four hospitals. In addition, a random selection of 115 major events was classified by a panel of anaesthetists into anaesthesia, surgical and patient-disease contributions. Across the three time periods, large variations in minor outcomes were found across the four hospitals; these variations ranged from two- to five-fold after case-mix adjustment (age, physical status, sex, emergency versus elective and length of anaesthesia). The rates of major events and deaths were similar across three hospitals; one hospital had a lower mortality rate (P less than 0.001) but had a higher rate of all major events (P less than 0.0001). Of major events assessed by physician panels, 18.3% had some anaesthetic involvement and no deaths were attributable partially or wholly to anaesthesia. Possible reasons to account for these variations in outcome include compliance in recording events, inadequate case-mix adjustment, differences in interpretation of the variables (despite guidelines) and institutional differences in monitoring, charting and observation protocols. The authors conclude that measuring quality of care in anaesthesia by comparing major outcomes is unsatisfactory since the contribution of anaesthesia to perioperative outcomes is uncertain and that variations may be explained by institutional differences which are beyond the control of the anaesthetist. It is suggested that minor adverse events, particularly those of concern to the patient, should be the next focus for quality improvement in anaesthesia.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Anaesth. 1993 Jan;40(1):79-818425250
PubMed ID
1596966 View in PubMed
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The Canadian four-centre study of anaesthetic outcomes: III. Are anaesthetic complications predictable in day surgical practice?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223844
Source
Can J Anaesth. 1992 May;39(5 Pt 1):440-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992
Author
P G Duncan
M M Cohen
W A Tweed
D. Biehl
W D Pope
R N Merchant
D. DeBoer
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesia, University of Saskatchewan, Canada.
Source
Can J Anaesth. 1992 May;39(5 Pt 1):440-8
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Anesthesia - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Anesthesia Recovery Period
Anesthesiology - education
Anesthetics - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Disease
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Intraoperative - statistics & numerical data
Multivariate Analysis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Postoperative Care - statistics & numerical data
Preoperative Care
Probability
Safety
Surgical Procedures, Operative - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To understand better the factors important to the safety of anaesthesia provided for day surgical procedures, we analyzed the intraoperative and immediate postoperative course of patients at four Canadian teaching hospitals' day treatment centres. After excluding those who received only monitored anaesthesia care, there were 6,914 adult (non-obstetrical) patients seen over a twelve-month period in 1988-89. The rate of adverse outcome consequent to their care was identified by a comprehensive surveillance system which included review of anaesthetic records (four hospitals) and follow-up telephone calls (two hospitals). The relationship between adverse events and preoperative factors was determined by using a multiple logistic regression analysis that included age, sex, duration of the procedure and the hospital care. There were no deaths during the study period and major morbid events were infrequent. Patient preoperative disease was predictive of some intraoperative events relating to the same organ system, but not to events in the PACU. Some unexpected relationships emerged including preoperative hypertension being related to a greater risk of difficult intubation, and neurological disease to perioperative cardiac abnormalities. Patients judged obese, or inadequately fasted, were found to experience a greater rate of recovery problems as well as discomfort. While the low response rate (36%) to the telephone interviews created a sampling bias, the high rate of patient dissatisfaction among those reached is disconcerting. We conclude that day surgical patients with preoperative medical conditions, even when optimally managed, are at higher risk for adverse events in the perioperative period.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Anaesth. 1993 Jan;40(1):79-818425250
PubMed ID
1596967 View in PubMed
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Canadian respirologists' experience with lymphangioleiomyomatosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187067
Source
Can Respir J. 2002 Nov-Dec;9(6):413-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Stacey M Pollock-BarZiv
Marsha M Cohen
Heather Maclean
Gregory P Downey
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research in Women's Health, Sunnybrook & Women's College Health Sciences Centre, 790 Bay Street, 7th Floor, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1N8, Canada. s.pollock.barziv@utoronto.ca
Source
Can Respir J. 2002 Nov-Dec;9(6):413-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Lung Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Lymphangioleiomyomatosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Physician's Practice Patterns
Pulmonary Medicine - standards - trends
Questionnaires
Rare Diseases
Risk assessment
Sampling Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Rate
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare pulmonary disease occurring primarily in women. A literature review of LAM in Canada found sporadic mention of LAM in case reports or within lung transplant studies. The LAM Foundation, a patient support and research funding organization, lists 23 Canadian patients in its database. The present study was designed to assess the scope of LAM across Canada and to identify potential patients for further evaluation.
To ascertain Canadian respirologists' experience with patients with LAM (current and historical), lung transplantation (single or bilateral) and deaths due to LAM, and awareness of the LAM Foundation.
Four hundred twelve brief surveys were sent anonymously to members of the Canadian Lung Association (inserted in their newsletters) to ascertain the experience of Canadian respirologists with LAM.
One hundred twelve surveys were returned (27%). Fifty-one respondents had "ever" been involved in the care of at least one patient with LAM; eight had cared for three or more patients. At the time of the study, 26 respondents were following a total of 46 patients with LAM; 22 of the 51 respirologists (43%) who had ever cared for a patient with LAM reported the death of a patient. Thirty-three patients had been put on wait lists for transplantation; six died while on the wait list. Nineteen patients underwent lung transplantation--six single-lung recipients and 13 bilateral lung recipients. Of the 51 respirologists who had ever cared for a patient with LAM, only 30 (61%) were aware of the LAM Foundation's services. Of the 112 respondents, only 47 (43%) were aware of the LAM Foundation.
This study identified a moderate level of awareness of a significant existing patient support and research service (the LAM Foundation). There were many patients with LAM who were unknown to the LAM Foundation and could benefit from its resources. Results suggest that there may be more patients with LAM in Canada than are reported in the existing literature.
PubMed ID
12522487 View in PubMed
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83 records – page 1 of 9.