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34 records – page 1 of 4.

Asthma, asthmalike symptoms, chronic bronchitis, and the degree of bronchial hyperresponsiveness in epidemiologic surveys.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234801
Source
Am Rev Respir Dis. 1987 Sep;136(3):613-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1987
Author
D A Enarson
S. Vedal
M. Schulzer
A. Dybuncio
M. Chan-Yeung
Source
Am Rev Respir Dis. 1987 Sep;136(3):613-7
Date
Sep-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - epidemiology
British Columbia
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Bronchial Spasm - epidemiology
Bronchitis - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Respiratory Sounds
Spirometry
Abstract
Measurement of bronchial hyperresponsiveness has been suggested to be a useful test in identifying subjects with asthma in epidemiologic groups. We explored the association between the degree of bronchial hyperresponsiveness, respiratory symptoms suggestive of asthma, chronic bronchitis, and various definitions of asthma based upon information obtained from a questionnaire. We determined bronchial hyperresponsiveness by methacholine inhalation test, administered a standardized respiratory questionnaire, and performed spirometry on 1,392 male workers in various industries: 229 (16.5%) had PC20 less than 8 mg/ml, 66 (4.7%) had PC20 less than 2 mg/ml, and 8 (0.6%) had PC20 less than 0.5 mg/ml. Only 760 workers had no respiratory symptoms; no workers with PC20 less than or equal to 0.5 mg/ml, 31.0% of workers with PC20 greater than 0.5 but less than or equal to 2 mg/ml, and 38.0% of workers with PC20 greater than 2 but less than or equal to 8 mg/ml had no chest symptoms. Those reporting wheeze or breathlessness, and especially those with both symptoms, were significantly more likely to have bronchial hyperresponsiveness with a low PC20. The reporting of chest tightness did not influence this relationship, and there was no difference between the occurrence of "wheeze without a cold" and "persistent wheeze." Although there was a stronger association of PC20 less than or equal to 2 mg/ml with asthma than with chronic bronchitis, the association of PC20 greater than 2 and less than or equal to 8 mg/ml was not different with asthma than with chronic bronchitis. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness was more closely associated with asthma than with any asthmalike symptoms ascertained by a questionnaire developed for the study of chronic bronchitis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
3498414 View in PubMed
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Comparison of dust related respiratory effects in Dutch and Canadian grain handling industries: a pooled analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211318
Source
Occup Environ Med. 1996 Aug;53(8):559-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1996
Author
S J Peelen
D. Heederik
H D Dimich-Ward
M. Chan-Yeung
S M Kennedy
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Wageningen, Netherlands.
Source
Occup Environ Med. 1996 Aug;53(8):559-66
Date
Aug-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Cereals
Dust - adverse effects
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Industry
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Respiration Disorders - etiology
Abstract
Four previously conducted epidemiological studies in more than 1200 grain workers were used to compare exposure-response relations between exposure to grain dust and respiratory health.
The studies included Dutch workers from an animal feed mill and a transfer grain elevator and Canadian workers from a terminal grain elevator and the docks. Relations between forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and exposure were analysed with multiple regression analysis corrected for smoking, age, and height. Exposure variables examined included cumulative and current dust exposure and the numbers of years a subject was employed in the industry. Sampling efficiencies of the Dutch and Canadian measurement techniques were compared in a pilot study. Results of this study were used to correct slopes of exposure-response relations for differences in dust fractions sampled by Dutch and Canadian personal dust samplers.
Negative exposure-response relations were shown for regressions of FEV1 on cumulative and current exposure and years employed. Slopes of the exposure-response relations differed by a factor of three to five between industries, apart from results for cumulative exposure. Here the variation in slopes differed by a factor of 100, from -1 to -0.009 ml/mg.y/m3. The variation in slopes between industries reduced to between twofold to fivefold when the Dutch transfer elevator workers were not considered. There was evidence that the small exposure-response slope found for this group is caused by misclassification of exposure and a strong healthy worker effect. Alternative, but less likely explanations for the variation in slopes were differences in exposure concentrations, composition of grain dust, exposure characteristics, and measurement techniques.
In conclusion, this study showed moderately similar negative exposure-response relations for four different populations from different countries, despite differences in methods of exposure assessment and exposure estimation.
Notes
Cites: Chest. 1979 Apr;75(4):461-7446134
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 1995 Apr;52(4):273-87795744
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1981 Jun;123(6):659-647271065
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1982 Oct;126(4):660-57125357
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1982 Nov;39(4):330-77138793
Cites: J Occup Med. 1983 Feb;25(2):131-416834161
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1984 Nov;130(5):759-656497158
Cites: J Occup Med. 1985 Dec;27(12):873-804087052
Cites: Am Ind Hyg Assoc J. 1986 Dec;47(12):825-313593471
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1987 Jan;135(1):194-2003800146
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1989;16(2):179-872788998
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1990 Jul;47(7):466-722383516
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1992 Feb;145(2 Pt 1):476-871736761
Cites: Am Ind Hyg Assoc J. 1992 Jun;53(6):362-81605108
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1992 Dec;146(6):1474-91456563
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1994 Jul;150(1):59-658025773
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1980 Jan;121(1):11-67352694
PubMed ID
8983468 View in PubMed
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Dyspnoea is associated with pulmonary function impairment in exposed workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201039
Source
Respir Med. 1999 Jan;93(1):39-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
A. Siracusa
P L Paggiaro
A. Forcina
D. Talini
A. Marabini
A. Benvenuti
G. Viegi
M. Chan-Yeung
Author Affiliation
University of Perugia, Italy.
Source
Respir Med. 1999 Jan;93(1):39-45
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dyspnea - epidemiology - physiopathology
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Italy
Male
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Vital Capacity
Abstract
This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of dysponea and its predictors in studies on several working male groups in British Columbia (BC), Canada (cedar sawmill, grain elevator, pulpmill, and aluminum smelter workers), and Tuscany (T), Italy, (shoe and furniture makers, millers, bakers, and pharmaceutical workers). We performed cross-sectional health studies (interviews and pulmonary function tests) for 2498 BC and 1474 T workers exposed to air contaminants, and 1110 BC and 243 T controls. Similar questionnaires and the same definitions were used in BC and in T. Pulmonary function tests were also performed. The participation rates were >92% in BC workers and 82% in T workers. The overall prevalence of moderate dyspnoea was not different in exposed BC and T workers in comparison with controls. Slight dyspnoea was significantly more frequent in BC workers, but not in T workers, with respect to controls. After adjusting for age, body mass index (BMI), smoking, current asthma, and chronic bronchitis, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) were found to be significantly associated with slight and moderate dyspnoea in BC workers, and slight dyspnoea in T workers. Isolated dyspnoea is associated with reduction in FEV1 and FVC in working populations, after adjusting for potentially confounding variables.
PubMed ID
10464847 View in PubMed
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Epidemiologic health study of workers in an aluminum smelter in British Columbia. Effects on the respiratory system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242050
Source
Am Rev Respir Dis. 1983 Apr;127(4):465-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1983
Author
M. Chan-Yeung
R. Wong
L. MacLean
F. Tan
M. Schulzer
D. Enarson
A. Martin
R. Dennis
S. Grzybowski
Source
Am Rev Respir Dis. 1983 Apr;127(4):465-9
Date
Apr-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aluminum - adverse effects
British Columbia
Health Surveys
Humans
Lung Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Respiratory Function Tests
Smoking
Spirometry
Abstract
A health survey was carried out on all white males in an aluminum smelter in British Columbia. The survey consisted of a medical-occupational questionnaire, spirometry, chest radiography, and environmental monitoring. We have compared the results of a respiratory survey in 713 workers in the office and casting department with no significant exposure to air contaminants (control workers) with those of 797 potroom workers: 495 who spent more than 50% of their working time in the potroom (high exposure) and 302 workers who spent less than 50% of their working time in the potroom (medium exposure). Potroom workers (high) had a significantly greater prevalence of cough and wheeze than did those in the control group, and they had significantly lower mean forced expiratory volume in one second and maximal midexpiratory flow rate than did those in the control group after adjustment had been made for differences in age, height, and smoking habits. Potroom workers (medium) had a slightly greater prevalence of respiratory symptoms and lower lung function than did workers in the control group, but the differences were not significant. We were unable to demonstrate potroom asthma. The levels of total fluoride, gaseous fluoride, particulate fluoride, sulphur dioxide, and total particulates found in the potroom at the time of the study were below the currently accepted threshold limit values, but the levels of benzo-alpha-pyrene were high.
PubMed ID
6838051 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of the respiratory health of dock workers who load grain cargoes in British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215407
Source
Occup Environ Med. 1995 Apr;52(4):273-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1995
Author
H D Dimich-Ward
S M Kennedy
M A Dittrick
A. DyBuncio
M. Chan-Yeung
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Occup Environ Med. 1995 Apr;52(4):273-8
Date
Apr-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cereals
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dust - adverse effects
Fever - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Prevalence
Respiration Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Abstract
To investigate the respiratory health of dock workers who load grain cargoes.
The respiratory health of 118 dock workers who load grain cargoes in the ports of Vancouver and Prince Rupert was compared with that of 555 grain elevator workers from the same regions. 128 civic workers were used as an unexposed control group.
The prevalences of chronic cough and phlegm were at least as high in dock workers as those found in the elevator workers, and when adjusted for differences in duration of employment and smoking, dock workers had an eightfold higher risk of developing chronic phlegm than did civic workers. Symptoms of eye and skin irritation that were experienced at least monthly were highest for dock workers. Average percentage of the predicted FEV1 and FVC for dock workers (mean 100.6% and 105.3% respectively) were similar to the civic workers but significantly higher than those found for elevator workers. Higher subjective estimates of duration of exposure to grain dust (hours/day) were associated with lower values of FEV1.
The more intermittent grain dust exposure patterns of dock workers may have allowed for some recovery of lung function, but chronic respiratory symptoms were less labile.
Notes
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1968 Mar;16(3):380-44230718
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1973 Aug;27(2):74-74198462
Cites: J Occup Med. 1979 May;21(5):342-6469595
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1980 Oct;122(4):601-87436126
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1981 Jun;123(6):659-647271065
Cites: Eur J Respir Dis. 1983 Apr;64(3):189-966840232
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Nov 15;136(10):1269-791476149
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1986 Sep;43(9):587-913756108
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1991 Oct;48(10):656-621931723
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1991 Dec;144(6):1314-211741544
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1992 Feb;145(2 Pt 1):476-871736761
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1992 Aug;49(8):576-801515349
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1992 Dec;146(6):1474-91456563
Cites: J Occup Med. 1985 Dec;27(12):873-804087052
PubMed ID
7795744 View in PubMed
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First-aid reports of acute chlorine gassing among pulpmill workers as predictors of lung health consequences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227289
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1991;20(1):71-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
D A Salisbury
D A Enarson
M. Chan-Yeung
S M Kennedy
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1991;20(1):71-81
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
British Columbia
Chlorine - adverse effects
Chlorine Compounds
Cross-Sectional Studies
First Aid
Gases - adverse effects
Humans
Lung Diseases - etiology
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Oxides - adverse effects
Paper
Questionnaires
Smoking
Abstract
Workers in pulpmills can be exposed to a multitude of gases hazardous to respiratory function, the most common of which is chlorine gas. First-aid reports of acute gas overexposure incidents ("gassings") over an 8 year period were used to generate exposure data on a group of pulpmill workers whose respiratory function had been studied cross-sectionally in 1981 and 1988. Three hundred forty-eight incidents representing 174 workers were identified, 78% of these being treated solely by the first-aid attendant with the administration of O2 and cough suppression medication. Among 316 workers tested during a 1988 respiratory health survey, 78 had at least one chlorine or chlorine dioxide "gassing" incident. There was a significant decrease in the FEV1/FVC ratio (p less than .05) as well as increased risk for workplace associated chest symptoms in this group with at least one "gassing" incident. In an age- and smoking-matched analysis, among workers tested both in 1981 and 1988, there was a greater decline in FEV2/FVC ratio and MMF (p less than .05) in the "gassed" group than in the nonexposed group over the 7 year period of observation. These results emphasize the need for worker protection against accidental chlorine gas exposures.
PubMed ID
1867219 View in PubMed
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Five cross-sectional studies of grain elevator workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222726
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Nov 15;136(10):1269-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1992
Author
M. Chan-Yeung
H. Dimich-Ward
D A Enarson
S M Kennedy
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Nov 15;136(10):1269-79
Date
Nov-15-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cereals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dust - adverse effects
Humans
Lung Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Respiratory Function Tests
Smoking - adverse effects
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
Five cross-sectional studies were conducted on grain workers in all the terminal elevators in British Columbia, Canada, at 3-year intervals from 1976 to 1988. Civic workers were studied in the same manner as a referent group. The studies consisted of questionnaires, spirometry using the same spirometers, allergy skin tests, and measurement of dust concentration by personal sampling. Although the dust concentration in the elevators was reduced progressively over the years, grain workers had more respiratory symptoms and lower lung function compared with the civic workers in each of the five cross-sectional studies. Exposure to grain dust was associated with significant reduction in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) but not in maximal midexpiratory flow rate or FEV1/FVC, suggesting reduction in volume which may be due to lesions in the lung parenchyma or in the small airways. Cigarette smoking was associated with significant reduction in FEV1, maximal midexpiratory flow rate, and FEV1/FVC due to airflow obstruction, but had no influence on FVC. Workers who took part in all five surveys tended to be a "healthier" selected group, but the grain workers still had lower lung function compared with the civic workers. This study confirmed previous findings that grain dust has adverse effects on the lungs. Cross-sectional study of the grain elevator workers proved to be a consistent and useful method to evaluate occupational health hazards.
PubMed ID
1476149 View in PubMed
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Genetic variants of the IL13 and IL4 genes and atopic diseases in at-risk children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184601
Source
Genes Immun. 2003 Jul;4(5):385-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
J-Q He
M. Chan-Yeung
A B Becker
H. Dimich-Ward
A C Ferguson
J. Manfreda
W T A Watson
A J Sandford
Author Affiliation
McDonald Research Laboratories/iCAPTURE Center, St Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Genes Immun. 2003 Jul;4(5):385-9
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Canada
Child, Preschool
Dermatitis, Atopic - genetics
European Continental Ancestry Group
Gene Frequency
Haplotypes - genetics
Humans
Interleukin-13 - genetics
Interleukin-4 - genetics
Linkage Disequilibrium - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
We studied a cohort containing 368 children at high risk of developing atopy and atopic disorders and 540 parents of those children to investigate whether the IL13 Arg130Gln and C-1112 T polymorphisms were associated with these outcomes. We also investigated whether haplotypes consisting of any two polymorphisms of IL13 Arg130Gln, IL13 C-1112 T and IL4 C-589 T were associated with these phenotypes. In 288 white children, the IL13 130Gln allele was associated with atopy (RR=1.9, P=0.047), and with atopic dermatitis (RR=2.5, P=0.014). The associations were confirmed using a family-based test of association (P=0.027 and 0.030, respectively) in all subjects. In white subjects there were associations of haplotypes consisting of IL13 Arg130Gln and IL4 C-589 T with atopic dermatitis (P=0.006) and with atopy (P=0.009). Our data suggest that the IL13 Arg130Gln polymorphism and haplotypes consisting of IL13 Arg130Gln and IL4 C-589 T were associated with the development of atopy and atopic dermatitis at 24 months of age.
PubMed ID
12847555 View in PubMed
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34 records – page 1 of 4.