Skip header and navigation

Refine By

4 records – page 1 of 1.

Source
Epidemiol Rev. 2007;29:77-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
M U Jakobsen
T. Berentzen
T I A Sørensen
K. Overvad
Author Affiliation
Institute of Preventive Medicine, Centre for Health And Society, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. muj@dce.au.dk
Source
Epidemiol Rev. 2007;29:77-87
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Fat - metabolism
Denmark
Fatty Liver - metabolism
Humans
Obesity - metabolism
Abstract
It has been hypothesized that visceral fat releases free fatty acids and adipokines and thereby exposes the liver to fat accumulation. The authors aimed to evaluate current epidemiologic evidence for an association between abdominal fat and liver fat content. Clinical and epidemiologic studies with data on abdominal fat and liver fat content were reviewed. Studies using waist circumference to estimate abdominal fat mass suggested a direct association between abdominal fat and liver fat content. Studies using imaging methods suggested a direct association between intraabdominal fat and liver fat content, but not between subcutaneous abdominal fat and liver fat content. In conclusion, clinical and epidemiologic studies of abdominal fat and liver fat content suggest a direct association between abdominal fat and liver fat content which is probably accounted for by visceral fat. However, results from the included studies do not allow strong conclusions regarding the temporal sequence of events. Future longitudinal studies are recommended to obtain additional information on associations and mechanisms. Both abdominal fat depots and other body compartments of interest should be included to further investigate the association between specific fat depots and liver fat content. Biomarkers may provide insight into underlying mechanisms.
PubMed ID
17478441 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dietary intake of whole grains and plasma alkylresorcinol concentrations in relation to changes in anthropometry: the Danish diet, cancer and health cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291645
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2017 08; 71(8):944-952
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2017
Author
C Kyrø
M Kristensen
M U Jakobsen
J Halkjær
R Landberg
Hb As Bueno-de-Mesquita
J Christensen
I Romieu
A Tjønneland
A Olsen
Author Affiliation
Unit of Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2017 08; 71(8):944-952
Date
08-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Alkylation
Biomarkers - blood
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Healthy Diet - ethnology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Overweight - blood - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control
Patient Compliance - ethnology
Prospective Studies
Resorcinols - blood
Risk
Secale
Self Report
Sex Factors
Triticum
Waist Circumference - ethnology
Weight Gain - ethnology
Whole Grains
Abstract
Whole grain intake has been associated with a small but significant lower body weight gain in observational studies, but there is limited knowledge about the associations with specific whole grain types. The objective was to investigate the association between whole grains, different sources of whole grains and biomarkers of whole grain intake (alkylresorcinols) in relation to subsequent changes in waist circumference (WC) and body weight.
Cohort study of 57?053 participants with baseline information on whole grain intake from questionnaires (FFQ) and biomarkers of whole grain rye and wheat intake, plasma alkylresorcinols, for a subset. WC and body weight were measured at baseline and again at follow-up. The associations were estimated using multiple linear regression analyses and logistic regression.
For women, overall whole grain intake was not related to changes in WC or body weight. For men, total whole grain intake was associated with gains in WC (?WC per 25?g increment: 0.44?cm, 95% CI: 0.34?cm; 0.54?cm) and body weight (?weight per 25?g increment: 150?g, 95% CI: 78?g; 222?g), but the results changed to null or changed direction when adjusting for baseline anthropometry. For the different sources of whole grains, rye (women) and crispbread was significantly associated with gains in WC and body weight. Plasma alkylresorcinol concentration was associated with reduced WC, but not body weight, for women (?WC per 50?nmol/l increment: -0.69?cm, 95% CI:-1.26?cm;-0.13?cm), but no association was found for men.
Overall, no strong relationship between whole grain intake, measured from questionnaires or using biomarkers was found in relation to changes in body weight and WC.
Notes
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Oct;84(4):789-97 PMID 17023705
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Nov;78(5):920-7 PMID 14594777
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2007;35(4):432-41 PMID 17786808
Cites: J Nutr. 2005 Sep;135(9):2263-70 PMID 16140909
Cites: J Nutr. 2005 Mar;135(3):580-3 PMID 15735097
Cites: Proc Nutr Soc. 2003 Feb;62(1):129-34 PMID 12740067
Cites: J Nutr Metab. 2012;2012:462967 PMID 22363838
Cites: Epidemiology. 2015 Jan;26(1):122-9 PMID 25401453
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2009 Dec;102(11):1547-51 PMID 19622189
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2012 Feb;40(1):76-84 PMID 21976053
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Oct;98(4):872-84 PMID 23945718
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2014 May 28;111(10):1881-90 PMID 24521535
Cites: World Health Organ Tech Rep Ser. 2000;894:i-xii, 1-253 PMID 11234459
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2011 Oct;14 (10 ):1787-95 PMID 21338557
Cites: Appetite. 2011 Dec;57(3):707-10 PMID 21907743
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2009 Mar 25;9:88 PMID 19320986
Cites: Physiol Behav. 2012 Feb 1;105(3):877-84 PMID 22061429
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Aug;109 (8):1356-66 PMID 19631041
Cites: Anal Biochem. 2009 Feb 1;385(1):7-12 PMID 19010298
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2014 May 15;179(10):1188-96 PMID 24699786
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Apr;87(4):832-8 PMID 18400704
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2004 Oct;92 (4):735-48 PMID 15522143
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2005 Aug 1;162(3):267-78 PMID 15987729
Cites: Food Nutr Res. 2013 Dec 12;57:null PMID 24358035
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Jan;89(1):290-6 PMID 19056600
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1991 Dec;20(4):906-12 PMID 1800429
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2014 Jan;106(1):djt352 PMID 24317181
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1997 Apr;65(4 Suppl):1220S-1228S; discussion 1229S-1231S PMID 9094926
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Feb;97(2):344-53 PMID 23269820
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Aug;98(2):594-619 PMID 23803885
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1991 Dec;20(4):900-5 PMID 1800428
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Nov;80(5):1237-45 PMID 15531671
Cites: J Agric Food Chem. 2004 Dec 29;52(26):8242-6 PMID 15612824
PubMed ID
28176776 View in PubMed
Less detail

Intake of ruminant trans fatty acids and changes in body weight and waist circumference.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122532
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2012 Oct;66(10):1104-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
C P Hansen
T L Berentzen
J. Halkjær
A. Tjønneland
T I A Sørensen
K. Overvad
M U Jakobsen
Author Affiliation
Section for Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. cph@soci.au.dk
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2012 Oct;66(10):1104-9
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cohort Studies
Dairy Products - adverse effects - analysis
Denmark
Diet - adverse effects
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Meat - adverse effects - analysis
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Obesity - etiology
Overweight - etiology
Questionnaires
Ruminants - metabolism
Trans Fatty Acids - administration & dosage - adverse effects - metabolism
Waist Circumference
Abstract
Follow-up studies have suggested that total intake of trans fatty acids (TFA) is a risk factor for gain in body weight and waist circumference (WC). However, in a cross-sectional study individual TFA isomers in adipose tissue had divergent associations with anthropometry. Our objective was to investigate the association between intake of TFA from ruminant dairy and meat products and subsequent changes in weight and WC. Furthermore, potential effect modification by sex, age, body mass index and WC at baseline was investigated.
Data on weight, WC, habitual diet and lifestyle were collected at baseline in a Danish cohort of 30,851 men and women aged 50-64 years. Follow-up information on weight and WC was collected 5 years after enrolment. The associations between intake of ruminant TFA (R-TFA) and changes in weight and WC were analysed using multiple linear regression with cubic spline modelling.
Intake of R-TFA, both absolute and energy-adjusted intake, was significantly associated with weight change. Inverse associations were observed at lower intakes with a levelling-off at intakes >1.2?g/day and 0.4 energy percentage (E %). Absolute, but not energy-adjusted, intake of R-TFA was significantly associated with WC change. An inverse association was observed at lower intakes with a plateau above an intake of 1.2?g/day.
The present study suggests that intake of R-TFA is weakly inversely associated with changes in weight, whereas no substantial association with changes in WC was found.
PubMed ID
22805493 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Questionnaire study among relatives: how satisfied are the elderly in the nursing home?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236988
Source
Sykepleien. 1986 May 23;73(9):13-5, 40
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-23-1986