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Analysis of mortality patterns and workers' compensation awards among asbestos insulation workers in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231845
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1989;16(5):523-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
M M Finkelstein
Author Affiliation
Health Studies Service, Ontario Ministry of Labour, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1989;16(5):523-8
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestos - adverse effects
Asbestosis - etiology - mortality
Humans
Insurance Claim Review
Male
Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Ontario
Workers' Compensation
Abstract
Mortality and workers' compensation patterns were studied among 1,064 Ontario asbestos insulation workers. A proportional mortality analysis of 153 asbestos worker deaths found increased mortality from malignant diseases (65 deaths observed; 35.1 expected), cancers of the lungs and pleura (32 deaths observed; 11.5 expected), peritoneal mesothelioma (4 deaths), and respiratory diseases (14 deaths observed; 7.9 expected). Despite the publicity given to asbestos-associated diseases, dependents of many men potentially eligible for workers compensation awards have not received pensions because claims were not filed. These findings suggest that much occupationally related disease is not being recognized in Ontario.
PubMed ID
2531545 View in PubMed
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Analysis of the exposure-response relationship for mesothelioma among asbestos-cement factory workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225183
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1991 Dec 31;643:85-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-31-1991

Diesel particulate exposure and diabetes mortality among workers in the Ontario construction trades.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158726
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2008 Mar;65(3):215
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008

Do factors other than need determine utilization of physicians' services in Ontario?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193217
Source
CMAJ. 2001 Sep 4;165(5):565-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-4-2001
Author
M M Finkelstein
Author Affiliation
Family Medicine Centre, Mount Sinai Hospital, Departments of Family and Community Medicine and Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. murray.finkelstein@utoronto.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2001 Sep 4;165(5):565-70
Date
Sep-4-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Health Expenditures
Health Services - utilization
Health services needs and demand
Health status
Humans
Income
Male
Medicine
Middle Aged
Ontario
Physicians - utilization
Regression Analysis
Specialization
Universal Coverage - utilization
Abstract
Universal health care systems seek to ensure access to care on the basis of need, rather than income, but there are concerns about preferential access to cardiovascular and specialist care for high income patients. In this study, I used population-based, individual-level health, income and utilization data to determine whether whether there is evidence for differential access to physician care in relation to household income.
I studied data for 2170 Ontario respondents to the 1995 National Population Health Survey (aged 40 to 79 years) who had approved linkage of their survey responses to the administrative databases of the Ontario Health Insurance Plan and for whom income data were available. I used linear and generalized linear regression to model the mean per capita expenditures on physician care and the probability of referral to a specialist in relation to income and self-reported health status.
Residents of higher income households incurred lower per capita expenditures for physicians' services than those in lower income households; for example, the mean per capita expenditure in the upper middle income group was $220 less (95% confidence interval -$87 to -$334) than the mean per capita expenditure in the lowest income group. Expenditures were significantly related to self-reported health status; for example, the mean per capita expenditure among those reporting fair health status was $590 higher (95% confidence interval $465 to $737) than among those reporting excellent health. After adjustment for health status, there was no association between income and the expenditures on all physician services, out-of-hospital services or specialist care.
Utilization of physicians' services in Ontario is based on need, rather than income.
Notes
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2000 Jul;51(1):123-3310817475
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Jan 11;162(1):45-611216197
Cites: CMAJ. 2001 Mar 20;164(6):809-1311276550
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1986 Jan;123(1):174-843509965
Cites: Health Serv Res. 1988 Feb;22(6):857-773126165
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1999 Oct 28;341(18):1359-6710536129
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Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 1999;20:125-4410352853
Cites: Med Care. 1989 Mar;27(3 Suppl):S99-1092921890
PubMed ID
11563208 View in PubMed
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Mortality among employees of an Ontario asbestos-cement factory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240576
Source
Am Rev Respir Dis. 1984 May;129(5):754-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1984
Author
M M Finkelstein
Source
Am Rev Respir Dis. 1984 May;129(5):754-61
Date
May-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - etiology - mortality
Adult
Aged
Asbestos - adverse effects
Carcinoma, Small Cell - etiology - mortality
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - etiology - mortality
Construction Materials - adverse effects
Epidemiologic Methods
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Male
Mesothelioma - etiology - mortality
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - etiology - mortality
Ontario
Risk
Time Factors
Abstract
Mortality among 535 asbestos-exposed and 205 nonexposed employees of an asbestos-cement factory was investigated. In the period beyond 20 yr from first exposure, the exposed workers had standardized mortality ratios of 175 for all causes of death, 370 for all malignancies, 480 for lung cancer, 240 for gastrointestinal cancers, and 17 deaths from mesothelioma; the factory control subjects had mortality rates similar to the general population. The cell-type distribution of the lung cancers was similar to that occurring in middle-aged smokers. Cumulative fiber exposures were calculated for the production workers, and mortality rates for the asbestos-associated malignancies were found to have significant trends with exposure. Exposure-related lung cancer risks were noted, with a large margin of uncertainty, to be similar to those observed in an American study of manmade mineral fiber workers.
PubMed ID
6326627 View in PubMed
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Mortality among employees of an Ontario factory manufacturing insulation materials from amosite asbestos.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231583
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1989;15(4):477-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
M M Finkelstein
Author Affiliation
Health Studies Service, Ontario Ministry of Labour, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1989;15(4):477-81
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestosis - epidemiology - mortality
Cohort Studies
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Occupational Medicine
Ontario
Quality Control
Abstract
The mortality of workers from an Ontario factory manufacturing amosite asbestos insulation materials under poorly controlled environmental conditions is reported here. Seven (58%) of 12 deaths among exposed workers 10 or more years after first exposure were due to malignancies; four (25%) were from lung cancer, and there were two deaths from peritoneal mesothelioma. Those dying from mesothelioma were 47 and 49 years of age. Three (25%) of 12 deaths were from respiratory disease, two were attributed to asbestosis (in men 42 and 53 years of ages), and one to pneumonia in a 54-year-old male.
PubMed ID
2729289 View in PubMed
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Mortality among employees of an Ontario factory that manufactured construction materials using chrysotile asbestos and coal tar pitch.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231518
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1989;16(3):281-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
M M Finkelstein
Author Affiliation
Health Studies Service, Ontario Ministry of Labour, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1989;16(3):281-7
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asbestos - adverse effects
Coal Tar - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Genital Neoplasms, Male - etiology - mortality
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Male
Mesothelioma - etiology - mortality
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - mortality
Ontario
Abstract
This paper describes mortality in a cohort of 324 men exposed to chrysotile asbestos and coal tar pitch used in the manufacture of electrical conduit pipe from a mixture of newsprint, bentonite, and asbestos. One death in a factory worker was attributed to pleural mesothelioma, and long-term employees experienced an increased risk of lung cancer (Standardized Mortality Ratio (SMR) 221; six deaths) and non-malignant respiratory disease (SMR 215; four deaths). In a case-control analysis, men whose jobs involved adding asbestos to the mix of raw materials were found to have a risk of lung cancer sevenfold higher (lower 95% confidence limit: 2.3) than men who had never worked at this job. Exposure to coal tar pitch is presumed to be responsible for the death of one worker from squamous cell carcinoma of the scrotum.
PubMed ID
2782316 View in PubMed
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Mortality among long-term employees of an Ontario asbestos-cement factory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241965
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1983 May;40(2):138-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1983
Author
M M Finkelstein
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1983 May;40(2):138-44
Date
May-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asbestosis - mortality
Construction Materials
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - mortality
Male
Mesothelioma - mortality
Middle Aged
Ontario
Time Factors
Abstract
Mortality was studied among a group of 328 employees of an Ontario asbestos-cement factory who had been hired before 1960 and who had been employed for a minimum of nine years. The group of 87 men who had worked in the rock wool/fibre glass operations, or who had been otherwise minimally exposed to asbestos, had mortality rates similar to those of the general Ontario population, while the group of asbestos-exposed employees had all-cause mortality rates double those of the Ontario population, mortality rates due to malignancies five times higher than expected, and deaths attributed to lung cancer eight times more frequent than expected. According to the best evidence available, 10 of 58 deaths among the production workers were due to malignant mesothelioma and 20 to lung cancer. The men dying of mesothelioma were younger than the men dying of lung cancer with mean ages at death of 51 and 64 years respectively. An exposure model was constructed on the basis of the available air sampling data, and individual exposure histories were calculated. These exposure histories were used to investigate the exposure-response relationships for asbestos-associated malignancies.
Notes
Cites: J Occup Med. 1973 Mar;15(3):248-524348280
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Cites: Br J Cancer. 1982 Jan;45(1):124-357059455
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1982 May;125(5):496-5017081805
PubMed ID
6830709 View in PubMed
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Mortality rates among employees potentially exposed to chrysotile asbestos at two automotive parts factories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230473
Source
CMAJ. 1989 Jul 15;141(2):125-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-1989
Author
M M Finkelstein
Author Affiliation
Health Studies Service, Ontario Ministry of Labour, Toronto.
Source
CMAJ. 1989 Jul 15;141(2):125-30
Date
Jul-15-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asbestos - adverse effects
Asbestos, Serpentine
Asbestosis - mortality
Automobiles
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Industry
Male
Neoplasms - mortality
Ontario
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
A study of the mortality rates among 1657 employees at two Ontario automotive parts factories that manufactured friction materials containing chrysotile asbestos was initiated in response to the workers' concerns about the effects of asbestos on their health. A total of 1194 men and 258 women had had their first potential exposure at least 10 years before the end of the study period; 563 of the men and 138 of the women had had such an exposure at least 20 years before the end of the study period. A significantly increased rate of death from laryngeal cancer and an elevated rate of death from lung cancer were observed in a cohort analysis. One or two deaths might have been due to pleural mesothelioma. There was no increase in the rate of death from gastrointestinal cancer or from nonmalignant respiratory disease. Case-control analysis showed no association between the risk of laryngeal or lung cancer and the total duration of employment (a surrogate for the extent of ambient exposure to asbestos or other workplace toxic substances) or employment in departments where asbestos had been used. An association between risk of death and occupational exposure is uncertain.
Notes
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1983 Feb;40(1):1-76297532
Cites: Int J Cancer. 1984 Nov 15;34(5):603-126500740
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1986 Mar;15(1):134-73754239
Cites: J Occup Med. 1988 Jan;30(1):23-73280756
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1988;13(5):569-803376946
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1984 May;41(2):151-76326794
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1984 May;129(5):754-616326627
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1981 Dec;67(6):1219-246947107
Cites: Comput Biomed Res. 1981 Aug;14(4):327-407261572
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Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1978 Oct;61(4):1025-30279708
Erratum In: Can Med Assoc J 1989 Sep 1;141(5):378
PubMed ID
2545323 View in PubMed
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Nasal cancer among North American woodworkers: another look.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229875
Source
J Occup Med. 1989 Nov;31(11):899-901
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1989
Author
M M Finkelstein
Author Affiliation
Health Studies Service, Ontario Ministry of Labour, Toronto, Canada.
Source
J Occup Med. 1989 Nov;31(11):899-901
Date
Nov-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Dust
Humans
Male
Nose Neoplasms - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Ontario
Paranasal Sinus Diseases - epidemiology
Risk factors
United States
Wood
Abstract
A death certificate case-control study of sinonasal cancer in Ontario has found increased relative risks among wood-workers. The results from four North American studies have been combined using the Mantel-Haenszel method, and the relative risk for woodworkers has been found to be 1.6 (P less than .01). It is concluded that North American softwoods, as well as hardwoods, may contain carcinogenic substances or their precursors.
Notes
Comment In: J Occup Med. 1990 May;32(5):422-32348257
PubMed ID
2681584 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.