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Analysis of mortality patterns and workers' compensation awards among asbestos insulation workers in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231845
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1989;16(5):523-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
M M Finkelstein
Author Affiliation
Health Studies Service, Ontario Ministry of Labour, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1989;16(5):523-8
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestos - adverse effects
Asbestosis - etiology - mortality
Humans
Insurance Claim Review
Male
Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Ontario
Workers' Compensation
Abstract
Mortality and workers' compensation patterns were studied among 1,064 Ontario asbestos insulation workers. A proportional mortality analysis of 153 asbestos worker deaths found increased mortality from malignant diseases (65 deaths observed; 35.1 expected), cancers of the lungs and pleura (32 deaths observed; 11.5 expected), peritoneal mesothelioma (4 deaths), and respiratory diseases (14 deaths observed; 7.9 expected). Despite the publicity given to asbestos-associated diseases, dependents of many men potentially eligible for workers compensation awards have not received pensions because claims were not filed. These findings suggest that much occupationally related disease is not being recognized in Ontario.
PubMed ID
2531545 View in PubMed
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Analysis of the exposure-response relationship for mesothelioma among asbestos-cement factory workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225183
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1991 Dec 31;643:85-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-31-1991
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Aug 10;161(3):245; author reply 245-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-1999
Author
M M Finkelstein
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Aug 10;161(3):245; author reply 245-6
Date
Aug-10-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Health Policy
Humans
Newfoundland and Labrador
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Notes
Comment On: CMAJ. 1999 Apr 6;160(7):1013-710207340
PubMed ID
10463041 View in PubMed
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Asbestos-associated cancers in the Ontario refinery and petrochemical sector.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210773
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1996 Nov;30(5):610-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1996
Author
M M Finkelstein
Author Affiliation
Ontario Ministry of Labour, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1996 Nov;30(5):610-5
Date
Nov-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Asbestos - adverse effects
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - mortality
Male
Mesothelioma - mortality
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - mortality
Occupations
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Petroleum
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
Asbestos has been widely used in the refinery and petrochemical sector. Mesothelioma has occurred among maintenance employees, and it was hypothesized that mesothelioma is a marker for exposures which might increase lung cancer risk. A death certificate-based case-control study of mesothelioma and lung cancer from 1980 to 1992 was conducted in an Ontario county with a substantial presence of these industries. Each of the 17 men who died of mesothelioma and 424 with lung cancer were matched with controls who died of other causes. The Job and Industry fields on the death certificates were abstracted. Employment as a maintenance worker in the refinery and petrochemical sector was associated with an increased risk of mesothelioma (odds ratio: 24.5; 90% confidence interval 3.1-102). The risk of lung cancer among petrochemical workers, in comparison with all other workers in the county, was 0.88. In an internal comparison of maintenance employees with other blue-collar workers in the refinery and petrochemical sector, the odds ratio for lung cancer was 1.73 (90% confidence interval 0.83-3.6). This finding is consistent with no difference in risk between maintenance and other employees, but it is also compatible with study power being too low to achieve statistical significance. The hypothesis of increased lung cancer risk could be examined more fully with nested case-control studies in existing cohorts. Meanwhile, it would be prudent to reinforce adherence to asbestos control measures in the refinery and petrochemical sector.
PubMed ID
8909610 View in PubMed
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Asbestosis in long-term employees of an Ontario asbestos-cement factory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243221
Source
Am Rev Respir Dis. 1982 May;125(5):496-501
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1982
Author
M M Finkelstein
Source
Am Rev Respir Dis. 1982 May;125(5):496-501
Date
May-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestosis - epidemiology
Canada
Humans
Male
Probability
Time Factors
Abstract
We studied the development of compensable (certified) asbestosis among the 201 workers at an asbestos-cement factory who were first exposed to asbestos dust prior to 1980 and who had been employed at least 15 yr. By July 1980, 39% of the production workers and 20% of the maintenance workers had developed a compensable chest disability; the "latent interval" generally exceeded 20 yr. Workers with asbestosis were found to have markedly elevated mortality rates with deaths caused by malignancies and respiratory disease being primarily responsible. We combined the limited air sampling data available with individual work histories to calculate 18-yr cumulative fiber exposures. The cumulative probability of certification was related to the cumulative exposures and the exposure-response relationship was found to be sigmoidal in form.
PubMed ID
7081805 View in PubMed
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Source
Occup Environ Med. 1995 Jan;52(1):51-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1995
Author
M M Finkelstein
Author Affiliation
Health and Safety Studies Unit, Ontario Ministry of Labour, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Occup Environ Med. 1995 Jan;52(1):51-3
Date
Jan-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Back Pain - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Parenting
Risk factors
Abstract
To test the hypothesis that reports of back pain in a working population are associated with parenthood.
A questionnaire survey of back pain in municipal fire fighters and police officers in a municipality in Ontario, Canada. The questionnaire was distributed to current employees of fire and police departments. The survey was completed by 129 fire fighters (68% of the active force) and 346 police officers (74% of the force).
36% of the respondents complained of a back problem. The prevalence increased from 13% among men aged 19 to 28 to 47% among men aged 49 to 59. The complaint was more common among firefighters (42%) than among police officers (33%). In a logistic regression analysis, back problems were significantly associated with the duration of employment, cigarette smoking, and the number of children.
Back pain is a multifactorial problem with significant impact on the working population. This survey has found that parenthood, a risk factor not previously described among men, is associated with self reported back pain. The mechanism presumably involves lifting of children or recreational factors. Fatherhood seems to be a confounder that should be controlled for in studies of occupational causes of back pain.
Notes
Cites: Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1980 Sep-Oct;5(5):419-236450452
Cites: Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1984 May-Jun;9(4):400-46236565
Cites: Occup Med. 1988 Jan-Mar;3(1):7-162963393
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 1991 Apr;17(2):81-901828614
Cites: J Occup Med. 1992 Feb;34(2):129-341534579
Comment In: Occup Environ Med. 1995 Oct;52(10):699-7007489063
PubMed ID
7697141 View in PubMed
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Body mass index and quality of life in a survey of primary care patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197520
Source
J Fam Pract. 2000 Aug;49(8):734-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
M M Finkelstein
Author Affiliation
Family Medicine Center, Mt Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. murray.finkelstein@utoronto.ca
Source
J Fam Pract. 2000 Aug;49(8):734-7
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body mass index
Female
Humans
Income
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Quality of Life
Abstract
The prevalence of overweight and obesity is increasing and contributes to the burden of ill health in the community. The impact of obesity on health-related quality of life has been less well studied than how it affects physical morbidity and mortality.
A survey of health-related quality of life using the 12-item Short Form (SF-12) of the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 was mailed to patients attending a family medicine clinic. Multiple regression analyses were used to investigate the relationships between scores on the mental and physical components of the SF-12 and body mass index (BMI) while controlling for age, sex, and family income.
Responses were received from 565 subjects (53%). The relationships among BMI and quality of life in the mental and physical domains were nonlinear. Quality of life scores were optimal when BMI was in the range of 20 to 25 kg per m2.
The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has published evidence-based clinical guidelines for the identification, evaluation, and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults. Subjects with BMI in the range 18.5 to 24.9 kg per m2 are classified as having normal weight. These observations suggest that achieving a weight in this range will maximize the patient's subjective sense of well-being.
PubMed ID
10947141 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among Ontario police officers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205225
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1998 Aug;34(2):157-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1998
Author
M M Finkelstein
Author Affiliation
Family Medicine Centre, Mt. Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. murray.finkelstein@utoronto.ca
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1998 Aug;34(2):157-62
Date
Aug-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Female
Healthy Worker Effect
Humans
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Police
Radar
Retrospective Studies
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) published a report in 1995 suggesting the possibility of increased incidence of testicular cancer, leukemia, and cancers of the brain, eye, and skin among police officers working with traffic radar. NIOSH recommended epidemiologic study of the issue. This report presents the results of a retrospective cohort cancer incidence study among 22,197 officers employed by 83 Ontario police departments. The standardized incidence ration (SIR) for all tumors sites was 0.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.83-0.98). There was an increased incidence of testicular cancer (SIR = 1.3, 90% CI = 0.9-1.8) and melanoma skin cancer (SIR = 1.45, 90% CI = 1.1-1.9). These anatomical sites might absorb energy from radar units, but at this time the author has no information about individual exposures to radar emissions, and it is not possible to draw etiologic conclusions. Nested case-control studies are planned to assess individual radar exposures.
PubMed ID
9651625 View in PubMed
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Source
CMAJ. 2001 May 1;164(9):1275; author reply 1275-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2001
Author
M M Finkelstein
Source
CMAJ. 2001 May 1;164(9):1275; author reply 1275-6
Date
May-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Welfare
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Health Surveys
Humans
Research Design
Sampling Studies
Starvation - epidemiology
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Oct 17;163(8):961-511068567
Comment On: CMAJ. 2000 Oct 17;163(8):961-511068567
PubMed ID
11341131 View in PubMed
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42 records – page 1 of 5.