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[All-Russian Consensus on Diagnosis and Treatment of Celiac Disease in Children and Adults].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283939
Source
Ter Arkh. 2017;89(3):94-107
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Author
A I Parfenov
S V Bykova
E A Sabel'nikova
I V Maev
A A Baranov
I G Bakulin
L M Krums
S V Bel'mer
T E Borovik
I N Zakharova
Yu A Dmitrieva
E A Roslavtseva
E A Kornienko
A I Khavkin
A S Potapov
M O Revnova
Yu G Mukhina
P L Shcherbakov
E D Fedorov
E A Belousova
I L Khalif
S G Khomeriki
D L Rotin
N G Vorob'eva
A V Pivnik
R B Gudkova
V V Chernin
N V Vokhmyanina
T V Pukhlikova
D A Degtyarev
I V Damulin
A M Mkrtumyan
G S Dzhulai
N K Tetruashvili
A Yu Baranovsky
L I Nazarenko
A G Kharitonov
I D Loranskaya
R G Saifutdinov
M A Livzan
D A Abramov
M F Osipenko
L V Oreshko
E I Tkachenko
S I Sitkin
L I Efremov
Source
Ter Arkh. 2017;89(3):94-107
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Adult
Celiac Disease - classification - diagnosis - therapy
Child
Disease Management
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Russia
Abstract
The paper presents the All-Russian consensus on the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease in children and adults, which has been elaborated by leading experts, such as gastroenterologists and pediatricians of Russia on the basis of the existing Russian and international guidelines. The consensus approved at the 42nd Annual Scientific Session of the Central Research Institute of Gastroenterology on Principles of Evidence-Based Medicine into Clinical Practice (March 2-3, 2016). The consensus is intended for practitioners engaged in the management and treatment of patients with celiac disease. Evidence for the main provisions of the consensus was sought in electronic databases. In making recommendations, the main source was the publications included in the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and PubMed. The search depth was 10 years. Recommendations in the preliminary version were reviewed by independent experts. Voting was done by the Delphic polling system.
PubMed ID
28378737 View in PubMed
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[European Registry on the management of Helicobacter pylori infection (Hp-EuReg protocol): The first results of Russian centers].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272879
Source
Ter Arkh. 2016;88(2):33-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
D S Bordin
O B Yanova
R A Abdulkhakov
V V Tsukanov
M A Livzan
S G Burkov
N V Zakharova
E Yu Plotnikova
M F Osipenko
L V Tarasova
I V Maev
Yu A Kucheryavyi
M A Butov
O A Sablin
S V Kolbasnikov
I N Voinovan
S R Abdulkhakov
A V Vasyutin
E A Lyalyukova
N N Golubev
I V Savilova
L V Grigoryeva
A G Kononova
Colm O'Morain
Mercedes Ramas
Adrian G Mcnicholl
Javier P Gisbert
Source
Ter Arkh. 2016;88(2):33-8
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Breath Tests - methods
Clinical Protocols
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Helicobacter Infections - diagnosis - physiopathology - therapy
Helicobacter pylori - drug effects - isolation & purification
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Proton Pump Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Russia - epidemiology
Sensitivity and specificity
Urease - analysis
Abstract
To assess the clinical practice of diagnosis and treatment in patients with Helicobacter pylori infection and to compare this practice with the international guidelines in the European Registry on the management of Helicobacter pylori infection, Hp-EuReg protocol), a multicenter prospective observational study initiated by the European Helicobacter and Microbiota Study Group. MATERIALs AND METHODS: The data of 813 patients infected with H. pylori and entered in the Hp-EuReg register by the Russian centers in 2013-2015 were analyzed.
The most common methods for the primary diagnosis of H. pylori infection are histology (40.3%), rapid urease test (35.7%), and serology (17.2%). The duration of H. pylori eradication therapy was 7, 10, and 14 days in 18.0, 49.3, and 25.1%, respectively. To monitor the effectiveness of treatment, the investigators used a histological examination (34%), a urea breath test (27.3%), H. pylori stool antigen (22.8%), and a rapid urease test (16.3%). A serological test was carried out in 2.5% of the cases. No monitoring was done in 13.5% of the patients. The average eradication efficiency was 82.6%. If the therapy was ineffective, 80% of physicians did not intend to prescribe a new cycle of treatment.
Significant differences were found between clinical practice and the current guidelines.
PubMed ID
27030181 View in PubMed
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[The prevalence of bacterial overgrowth syndrome and its associated factors in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (according to the data of the Novosibirsk registry)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283171
Source
Ter Arkh. 2017;89(2):15-19
Publication Type
Article
Author
Yu A Kulygina
M F Osipenko
M I Skalinskaya
K D Pal'chunova
Source
Ter Arkh. 2017;89(2):15-19
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blind Loop Syndrome - epidemiology - physiopathology
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
To assess the prevalence of bacterial overgrowth syndrome (BOS) and its risk factors in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD).
The patients from the Novosibirsk IBD registry, who had undergone a hydrogen breath test (HBT) using a Gastro+ device, were examined.
In 93 IBD patients who had undergone a HBD, the prevalence of BOS was 48% (46.2% for ulcerative colitis and 51.2% for Crohn's disease). There was a strong correlation between abdominal bloating, abdominal rumbling, and positive HBT results in both patient groups. During the HBT, the patients with BOS frequently complained of diarrhea, borborygmi, belching, and anxiety.
The findings suggest that BOS is highly prevalent among patients with IBD. BOS is associated with clinical symptoms, such as abdominal bloating, abdominal rumbling, tearfulness, and irritability.
PubMed ID
28281510 View in PubMed
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