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Life-style factors and risk for abdominal aortic aneurysm in a cohort of Finnish male smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196236
Source
Epidemiology. 2001 Jan;12(1):94-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2001
Author
M E Törnwall
J. Virtamo
J K Haukka
D. Albanes
J K Huttunen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Kansanterveyslaitos, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Epidemiology. 2001 Jan;12(1):94-100
Date
Jan-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Blood pressure
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cohort Studies
Diet
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Risk
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
Prospective studies evaluating risk factors for abdominal aortic aneurysm are few. We studied the association of life-style factors with risk for abdominal aortic aneurysm among 29,133 male smokers 50-69 years of age, participants in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study. During a mean follow-up of 5.8 years, 181 were diagnosed with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm or nonruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm plus aneurysmectomy. Risk for abdominal aortic aneurysm was positively associated with age [relative risk (RR) = 4.56, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.42-8.61 for > 65 vs 40 vs 160 vs 100 vs 6.5 vs 1.5 vs
Notes
Comment In: Epidemiology. 2001 Nov;12(6):75211679808
PubMed ID
11138827 View in PubMed
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Prospective study of diet, lifestyle, and intermittent claudication in male smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198725
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2000 May 1;151(9):892-901
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2000
Author
M E Törnwall
J. Virtamo
J K Haukka
A. Aro
D. Albanes
J K Huttunen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2000 May 1;151(9):892-901
Date
May-1-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Age Distribution
Aged
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage
Blood pressure
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Dietary Supplements
Energy Metabolism
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Intermittent Claudication - epidemiology - metabolism - prevention & control
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology - metabolism
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Vitamin A - administration & dosage
Vitamin E - administration & dosage - blood
beta Carotene - administration & dosage - blood
Abstract
The association between dietary and lifestyle factors and intermittent claudication was investigated in the Finnish Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study. The cohort comprised 26,872 male smokers aged 50-69 years who were free of claudication at study entry. At baseline (1985-1988), subjects completed a diet history questionnaire. During a median follow-up period of 4 years (ending in spring 1993), 2,578 men reported symptoms of claudication on the Rose questionnaire, which was administered annually. Smoking status was assessed every 4 months. Smoking, systolic blood pressure, serum total cholesterol, and diabetes mellitus were positively associated with risk for claudication, whereas serum high density lipoprotein cholesterol, education, and leisure time exercise were inversely associated with risk. Dietary carbohydrates, fiber, and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids were inversely associated with risk for claudication, as were some dietary and serum antioxidants: dietary vitamin C (highest quartile vs. lowest: relative risk (RR) = 0.86; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.77, 0.97), dietary gamma-tocopherol (RR = 0.89; 95% CI: 0.79, 1.00), dietary carotenoids (RR = 0.82; 95% CI: 0.73, 0.92), serum alpha-tocopherol (RR = 0.88; 95% CI: 0.77, 1.00), and serum beta-carotene (RR = 0.77; 95% CI: 0.68, 0.86). Smoking cessation reduced subsequent risk for claudication (RR = 0.86; 95% CI: 0.75, 0.99). The authors conclude that classical risk factors for atherosclerosis are associated with claudication. High intakes of antioxidant vitamins may be protective. Further research is needed before antioxidants can be recommended for the prevention of intermittent claudication.
PubMed ID
10791562 View in PubMed
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