Skip header and navigation

Refine By

16 records – page 1 of 2.

Body Weight and Body Mass Index Influence Bone Mineral Density in Late Adolescence in a Two-Year Follow-Up Study. The Tromsø Study: Fit Futures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308417
Source
JBMR Plus. 2019 Sep; 3(9):e10195
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2019
Author
Ole Andreas Nilsen
Luai Awad Ahmed
Anne Winther
Tore Christoffersen
Gyrd Thrane
Elin Evensen
Anne-Sofie Furberg
Guri Grimnes
Elaine Dennison
Nina Emaus
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Care Sciences The Arctic University of Norway Tromsø Norway.
Source
JBMR Plus. 2019 Sep; 3(9):e10195
Date
Sep-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Determinants of bone acquisition in late adolescence and early adulthood are not well-described. This 2-year follow-up study explored the associations of body weight (BW), body mass index (BMI), and changes in weight status with adolescent bone accretion in a sample of 651 adolescents (355 girls and 296 boys) between 15 and 19 years of age from The Tromsø Study: Fit Futures. This Norwegian population-based cohort study was conducted from 2010 to 2011 and was repeated from 2012 to 2013. We measured femoral neck, total hip, and total body bone mineral content and areal bone mineral density (aBMD) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. We measured height, BW, calculated BMI (kg/m 2), and collected information on lifestyle at both surveys. Mean BMI (SD) at baseline was 22.17 (3.76) and 22.18 (3.93) in girls and boys, respectively. Through multiple linear regression, baseline BW and BMI were positively associated with ?aBMD over 2 years of follow-up at all skeletal sites in boys ( p
PubMed ID
31667452 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bone mineral density at the hip and its relation to fat mass and lean mass in adolescents: the Tromsø Study, Fit Futures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294684
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2018 01 19; 19(1):21
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-19-2018
Author
Anne Winther
Lone Jørgensen
Luai Awad Ahmed
Tore Christoffersen
Anne-Sofie Furberg
Guri Grimnes
Rolf Jorde
Ole Andreas Nilsen
Elaine Dennison
Nina Emaus
Author Affiliation
Division of Neurosciences, Orthopedics and Rehabilitation Services, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway. anne.winther@unn.no.
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2018 01 19; 19(1):21
Date
01-19-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon - methods
Adipose Tissue - diagnostic imaging - physiology
Adolescent
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Bone Density - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise - physiology
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Life Style
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Pelvic Bones - diagnostic imaging - physiology
Abstract
Positive association between body weight and bone mass is well established, and the concept of body mass index (BMI) is associated with higher areal bone mineral density (aBMD) and reduced fracture risk. BMI, that comprises both fat mass (FM) and lean mass (LM) may contribute to peak bone mass achievement in different ways. This study explored the influence of body composition in terms of total body LM and FM on hip aBMD-values in adolescence.
In 2010/2011, 93% of the region's first-year upper-secondary school students (15-17 years old) in Tromsø, Norway attended the Tromsø Study, Fit Futures. Areal BMD at femoral neck (aBMDFN) and total hip (aBMDTH) (g/cm2), total body LM and FM (g) were measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Height and weight were measured, and BMI calculated. Lifestyle variables were collected by self-administered questionnaires and interviews, including questions on time spent on leisure time physical activity. Stratified analyses of covariance and regression models included 395 girls and 363 boys. Crude results were adjusted for age, height, sexual maturation, physical activity levels, vitamin D levels, calcium intake, alcohol consumption and smoking habits.
Unadjusted distribution indicated higher aBMD-levels at higher LM-levels in both genders (p?
Notes
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2016 Apr;27(4):1281-386 PMID 26856587
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2006 May;14(5):819-25 PMID 16855191
Cites: J Youth Adolesc. 1988 Apr;17(2):117-33 PMID 24277579
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2008 May;19(5):595-606 PMID 17965817
Cites: Bone. 2000 Aug;27(2):203-7 PMID 10913912
Cites: Obes Res. 2002 Jan;10(1):56-60 PMID 11786602
Cites: J Bone Miner Metab. 2007;25(6):423-30 PMID 17968496
Cites: J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab. 2000 Jun;13(6):571-90 PMID 10905381
Cites: Bone. 2004 Nov;35(5):1169-79 PMID 15542043
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Jan;99(1):30-8 PMID 24384013
Cites: Bone. 2014 Jul;64:298-302 PMID 24792957
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2014 Apr;25(4):1297-304 PMID 24326885
Cites: Arch Biochem Biophys. 2010 Nov 1;503(1):20-7 PMID 20599663
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2014 Nov;42(7):593-602 PMID 25053469
Cites: Nutrients. 2013 Jun 06;5(6):2047-61 PMID 23743968
Cites: Circulation. 1968 Dec;38(6):1104-15 PMID 5721960
Cites: Arch Osteoporos. 2017 Dec;12 (1):37 PMID 28389986
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2005 Nov;16(11):1330-8 PMID 15928804
Cites: BMJ. 1996 May 18;312(7041):1254-9 PMID 8634613
Cites: J Musculoskelet Neuronal Interact. 2005 Jul-Sep;5(3):239-54 PMID 16172515
Cites: Bone. 2015 May;74:146-52 PMID 25652209
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2005 Jun;16(6):581-9 PMID 15616758
Cites: Arch Osteoporos. 2014;9:185 PMID 24893722
Cites: Rheumatol Int. 2012 Sep;32(9):2737-43 PMID 21809005
Cites: Calcif Tissue Int. 2017 May;100(5):500-513 PMID 28013362
Cites: Compr Physiol. 2013 Jul;3(3):1337-62 PMID 23897689
Cites: Bone. 2010 Feb;46(2):294-305 PMID 19840876
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2011 Aug;26(8):1729-39 PMID 21520276
Cites: J Clin Densitom. 2008 Apr-Jun;11(2):276-82 PMID 18158262
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2007 Jan;92(1):143-7 PMID 17047019
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Oct;80(4):966-72 PMID 15447907
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2006 Jul;91(7):2534-41 PMID 16621904
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2000;11(12):985-1009 PMID 11256898
Cites: Bone. 2009 May;44(5):752-7 PMID 19103314
Cites: Hormones (Athens). 2013 Apr-Jun;12(2):214-23 PMID 23933690
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2006;17(3):337-47 PMID 16331359
Cites: BMJ Open. 2015 Apr 22;5(6):e006665 PMID 26063563
Cites: Bone. 2012 Feb;50(2):457-66 PMID 21619952
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2008 Jan;19(1):29-38 PMID 17660933
Cites: Sports Med. 2006;36(9):723-32 PMID 16937949
Cites: Pediatr Obes. 2013 Dec;8(6):418-27 PMID 23447431
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2003 Jul;14(7):539-47 PMID 12844213
Cites: JAMA. 2002 Oct 16;288(15):1889-97 PMID 12377088
Cites: Eur J Appl Physiol. 2009 Mar;105(5):759-64 PMID 19096868
Cites: Maturitas. 2008 Feb 20;59(2):191-200 PMID 18221845
PubMed ID
29351755 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bone mineral density at the hip and its relation to fat mass and lean mass in adolescents: the Tromsø Study, Fit Futures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289232
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2018 01 19; 19(1):21
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-19-2018
Author
Anne Winther
Lone Jørgensen
Luai Awad Ahmed
Tore Christoffersen
Anne-Sofie Furberg
Guri Grimnes
Rolf Jorde
Ole Andreas Nilsen
Elaine Dennison
Nina Emaus
Author Affiliation
Division of Neurosciences, Orthopedics and Rehabilitation Services, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway. anne.winther@unn.no.
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2018 01 19; 19(1):21
Date
01-19-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Positive association between body weight and bone mass is well established, and the concept of body mass index (BMI) is associated with higher areal bone mineral density (aBMD) and reduced fracture risk. BMI, that comprises both fat mass (FM) and lean mass (LM) may contribute to peak bone mass achievement in different ways. This study explored the influence of body composition in terms of total body LM and FM on hip aBMD-values in adolescence.
In 2010/2011, 93% of the region's first-year upper-secondary school students (15-17 years old) in Tromsø, Norway attended the Tromsø Study, Fit Futures. Areal BMD at femoral neck (aBMDFN) and total hip (aBMDTH) (g/cm2), total body LM and FM (g) were measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Height and weight were measured, and BMI calculated. Lifestyle variables were collected by self-administered questionnaires and interviews, including questions on time spent on leisure time physical activity. Stratified analyses of covariance and regression models included 395 girls and 363 boys. Crude results were adjusted for age, height, sexual maturation, physical activity levels, vitamin D levels, calcium intake, alcohol consumption and smoking habits.
Unadjusted distribution indicated higher aBMD-levels at higher LM-levels in both genders (p?
Notes
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2016 Apr;27(4):1281-386 PMID 26856587
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2006 May;14(5):819-25 PMID 16855191
Cites: J Youth Adolesc. 1988 Apr;17(2):117-33 PMID 24277579
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2008 May;19(5):595-606 PMID 17965817
Cites: Bone. 2000 Aug;27(2):203-7 PMID 10913912
Cites: Obes Res. 2002 Jan;10(1):56-60 PMID 11786602
Cites: J Bone Miner Metab. 2007;25(6):423-30 PMID 17968496
Cites: J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab. 2000 Jun;13(6):571-90 PMID 10905381
Cites: Bone. 2004 Nov;35(5):1169-79 PMID 15542043
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Jan;99(1):30-8 PMID 24384013
Cites: Bone. 2014 Jul;64:298-302 PMID 24792957
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2014 Apr;25(4):1297-304 PMID 24326885
Cites: Arch Biochem Biophys. 2010 Nov 1;503(1):20-7 PMID 20599663
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2014 Nov;42(7):593-602 PMID 25053469
Cites: Nutrients. 2013 Jun 06;5(6):2047-61 PMID 23743968
Cites: Circulation. 1968 Dec;38(6):1104-15 PMID 5721960
Cites: Arch Osteoporos. 2017 Dec;12 (1):37 PMID 28389986
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2005 Nov;16(11):1330-8 PMID 15928804
Cites: BMJ. 1996 May 18;312(7041):1254-9 PMID 8634613
Cites: J Musculoskelet Neuronal Interact. 2005 Jul-Sep;5(3):239-54 PMID 16172515
Cites: Bone. 2015 May;74:146-52 PMID 25652209
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2005 Jun;16(6):581-9 PMID 15616758
Cites: Arch Osteoporos. 2014;9:185 PMID 24893722
Cites: Rheumatol Int. 2012 Sep;32(9):2737-43 PMID 21809005
Cites: Calcif Tissue Int. 2017 May;100(5):500-513 PMID 28013362
Cites: Compr Physiol. 2013 Jul;3(3):1337-62 PMID 23897689
Cites: Bone. 2010 Feb;46(2):294-305 PMID 19840876
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2011 Aug;26(8):1729-39 PMID 21520276
Cites: J Clin Densitom. 2008 Apr-Jun;11(2):276-82 PMID 18158262
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2007 Jan;92(1):143-7 PMID 17047019
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Oct;80(4):966-72 PMID 15447907
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2006 Jul;91(7):2534-41 PMID 16621904
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2000;11(12):985-1009 PMID 11256898
Cites: Bone. 2009 May;44(5):752-7 PMID 19103314
Cites: Hormones (Athens). 2013 Apr-Jun;12(2):214-23 PMID 23933690
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2006;17(3):337-47 PMID 16331359
Cites: BMJ Open. 2015 Apr 22;5(6):e006665 PMID 26063563
Cites: Bone. 2012 Feb;50(2):457-66 PMID 21619952
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2008 Jan;19(1):29-38 PMID 17660933
Cites: Sports Med. 2006;36(9):723-32 PMID 16937949
Cites: Pediatr Obes. 2013 Dec;8(6):418-27 PMID 23447431
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2003 Jul;14(7):539-47 PMID 12844213
Cites: JAMA. 2002 Oct 16;288(15):1889-97 PMID 12377088
Cites: Eur J Appl Physiol. 2009 Mar;105(5):759-64 PMID 19096868
Cites: Maturitas. 2008 Feb 20;59(2):191-200 PMID 18221845
PubMed ID
29351755 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bone mineral density at the hip in Norwegian women and men--prevalence of osteoporosis depends on chosen references: the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151994
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2009;24(6):321-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Nina Emaus
Tone K Omsland
Luai Awad Ahmed
Guri Grimnes
Monica Sneve
Gro K Berntsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromso, Norway. nina.emaus@ism.uit.no
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2009;24(6):321-8
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bone Density - physiology
Female
Hip - physiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Abstract
This study describes bone mineral density (BMD) and the prevalence of osteoporosis in women and men between 30-89 years in an unselected population. BMD was measured in g/cm(2) at total hip and femoral neck by dual-energy-X-ray absorptiometry in 3,094 women and 2,132 men in the 2001 Tromsø Study. BMD levels were significantly explained by age and declined progressively in both sexes from middle into old age, with highest decline in women. With osteoporosis defined as a T-score of two and a half standard deviation below the young adult mean BMD, the prevalence at the total hip in subjects above 70 years was 6.9% in men and 15.3% in women, respectively, using the Lunar reference material for T-score calculations. The prevalence increased significantly to 7.3% in men and 19.5% in women, when T-scores were calculated on basis of the young adult mean BMD (age group 30-39 years) in the study population. At the femoral neck, prevalence of osteoporosis increased from 13.5 to 18.5% in men, and from 20.4 to 35.2% in women above 70 years, respectively, depending on how T-scores were calculated. The study highlights the challenges with fixed diagnostic levels when measuring normally distributed physiologic parameters. Although BMD only partly explains fracture risk, future studies should evaluate which calculations give optimal fracture prediction.
PubMed ID
19296062 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes and tracking of bone mineral density in late adolescence: the Tromsø Study, Fit Futures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281654
Source
Arch Osteoporos. 2017 Dec;12(1):37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Ole Andreas Nilsen
Luai Awad Ahmed
Anne Winther
Tore Christoffersen
Anne-Sofie Furberg
Guri Grimnes
Elaine Dennison
Nina Emaus
Source
Arch Osteoporos. 2017 Dec;12(1):37
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Areal bone mineral density (aBMD) predicts future fracture risk. This study explores the development of aBMD and associated factors in Norwegian adolescents. Our results indicate a high degree of tracking of aBMD levels in adolescence. Anthropometric measures and lifestyle factors were associated with deviation from tracking.
Norway has one of the highest reported incidences of hip fractures. Maximization of peak bone mass may reduce future fracture risk. The main aims of this study were to describe changes in bone mineral levels over 2?years in Norwegian adolescents aged 15-17?years at baseline, to examine the degree of tracking of aBMD during this period, and to identify baseline predictors associated with positive deviation from tracking.
In 2010-2011, all first year upper secondary school students in Troms? were invited to the Fit Futures study and 1038 adolescents (93%) attended. We measured femoral neck (FN), total hip (TH), and total body (TB) aBMD as g/cm(2) by DXA. Two years later, in 2012-2013, we invited all participants to a follow-up survey, providing 688 repeated measures of aBMD.
aBMD increased significantly (p?
Notes
Cites: Pediatrics. 2007 Mar;119 Suppl 2:S131-617332232
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1999 Dec;84(12):4702-1210599739
Cites: Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2013 Feb;27(1):47-5323384745
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2016 Apr;27(4):1281-38626856587
Cites: J Pediatr. 2014 Jun;164(6):1280-5.e224485819
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2010 Sep;25(9):1948-5720499378
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2012 Sep;23(9):2239-5622419370
Cites: J Youth Adolesc. 1988 Apr;17(2):117-3324277579
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2003 Jul;14(7):548-5812730753
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2010 Apr;95(4):1690-820194709
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1992 Oct;75(4):1060-51400871
Cites: Calcif Tissue Int. 2001 May;68(5):259-7011683532
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2010 Jan;21(1):179-8219387763
Cites: Eur J Pediatr. 2005 Oct;164(10):621-516012856
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2005 Feb;16(2):155-6215175845
Cites: Int J Sports Med. 1997 Jul;18 Suppl 3:S191-49272847
Cites: Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2015 Dec;25 Suppl 4:119-2526589125
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2007 Mar;18(3):391-40017091218
Cites: Arch Osteoporos. 2014;9:18524893722
Cites: JAMA. 2000 Mar 8;283(10):1318-2110714731
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2013 Apr;52(4):393-923298983
Cites: Calcif Tissue Int. 2014 Feb;94(2):232-924101230
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2000 Nov;15(11):2259-6511092408
Cites: J Clin Densitom. 2014 Apr-Jun;17(2):225-4224690232
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2010 Nov;38(5 Suppl):105-1821062845
Cites: Lancet. 2000 Feb 5;355(9202):469-7010841134
Cites: Bone. 2010 Feb;46(2):294-30519840876
Cites: Calcif Tissue Int. 2015 May;96(5):379-8825716719
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2011 Aug;26(8):1729-3921520276
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2012 Aug;41(4):961-721422063
Cites: Bone. 2009 May;44(5):752-719103314
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2012 Aug;23(8):2081-9222349964
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 1994 Jul;4(4):185-907949748
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2006;17(3):337-4716331359
Cites: Sports Med. 2006;36(9):723-3216937949
Cites: J Bone Miner Metab. 2011 Mar;29(2):208-1620711620
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2009 Apr;20(4):631-818633663
Cites: Contraception. 2012 Dec;86(6):606-2122717184
PubMed ID
28389986 View in PubMed
Less detail

Does the frequency and intensity of physical activity in adolescence have an impact on bone? The Tromsø Study, Fit Futures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267671
Source
BMC Sports Sci Med Rehabil. 2015;7:26
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Tore Christoffersen
Anne Winther
Ole Andreas Nilsen
Luai Awad Ahmed
Anne-Sofie Furberg
Guri Grimnes
Elaine Dennison
Nina Emaus
Source
BMC Sports Sci Med Rehabil. 2015;7:26
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Optimization of the genetic potential for bone accrual in early life may prevent future fractures. Possible modification factors include lifestyle factors such as nutrition and physical activity. Measured levels of bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mass content (BMC) are indicators of bone strength, and are correlated with fracture risk. This study explored the impact of self-reported physical activity frequencies and intensity on BMD and BMC in Norwegian adolescents.
In 2010-2011 school students in two North-Norwegian municipalities were invited to a health survey, the Fit Future study. 508 girls and 530 boys aged 15-18 years attended. BMD and BMC were measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry. Physical activity and other lifestyle-factors were reported by questionnaires and clinical interviews. Statistical analyses were performed sex stratified, using ANOVA for comparison of means and linear regression models adjusting for factors known to affect bone.
Approximately 2/3 of girls and boys reported themselves as physically active outside school hours. Active participants had a significantly higher BMD and BMC at all sites (p?
PubMed ID
26561526 View in PubMed
Less detail

High-sensitivity C-reactive protein is an independent risk factor for non-vertebral fractures in women and men: The Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258448
Source
Bone. 2014 Nov 20;72C:65-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-20-2014
Author
Kristoffer Dahl
Luai Awad Ahmed
Ragnar Martin Joakimsen
Lone Jørgensen
Anne Elise Eggen
Erik Fink Eriksen
Ashild Bjørnerem
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Care Sciences, UiT-The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Bone. 2014 Nov 20;72C:65-70
Date
Nov-20-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Low-grade inflammation is associated with fractures, while the relationship between inflammation and bone mineral density (BMD) is less clear. Moreover, any gender differences in the sensitivity to inflammation are still poorly elucidated. We therefore tested the hypothesis that high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) is an independent risk factor for low BMD and non-vertebral fractures, in both genders, and whether there are gender differences in these associations. CRP levels and BMD at the total hip and femoral neck were measured in 1902 women and 1648 men between 55 and 74years of age, at baseline in the Tromsø Study, Norway, in 2001-2002. Non-vertebral fractures were registered from hospital X-ray archives during an average of 7.2years follow-up. Linear regression analyses were used for CRP association with BMD and Cox proportional hazards model for fracture prediction by CRP. During 25 595 person-years follow-up, 366 (19%) women and 126 (8%) men suffered a non-vertebral fracture. There was no association between CRP and BMD in women, but an inverse association in men (p=0.001) after adjustment for age and body mass index. Each standard deviation (SD) increase in log-CRP was associated with an increased risk for non-vertebral fracture by 13% in women and 22% in men (hazard ratios (HRs) 1.13, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.26, p=0.026 and 1.22, 95% CI=1.00-1.48, p=0.046, respectively). After adjustment for BMD and other risk factors, women with CRP in the upper tertile exhibited 39% higher risk for fracture than those in the lowest tertile of CRP (HR=1.39, 95% CI=1.06-1.83, p=0.017), while men in the upper tertile exhibited 80% higher risk (HR=1.80, 95% CI=1.10-2.94, p=0.019). In summary, CRP was not associated with BMD in women but inversely associated in men, and predicted fractures in both genders. We infer that inflammation influence fracture risk in both women and men, although the biological mechanisms may differ between the genders.
PubMed ID
25460573 View in PubMed
Less detail

Impacts of body mass index, physical activity, and smoking on femoral bone loss: the Tromsø study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262196
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2014 Sep;29(9):2080-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Nina Emaus
Tom Wilsgaard
Luai Awad Ahmed
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2014 Sep;29(9):2080-9
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Bone Density
Bone Resorption - physiopathology
Female
Femur - physiopathology
Femur Neck - physiopathology
Hip - physiopathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Norway
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
Bone mineral density (BMD) is a reflection of bone strength and lifestyles that preserve bone mass and may reduce fracture risk in old age. This study examined the effect of combined profiles of smoking, physical activity, and body mass index (BMI) on lifetime bone loss. Data were collected from the population-based Tromsø Study. BMD was measured as g/cm(2) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at the total hip and femoral neck in 2580 women and 2084 men aged 30 to 80 years in the 2001-02 survey, and repeated in 1401 women and 1113 men in the 2007-08 survey. Height and weight were measured and lifestyle information was collected through questionnaires. Data were analyzed using linear mixed models with second-degree fractional polynomials. From the peak at the age around 40 years to 80 years of age, loss rates varied between 4% at the total hip and 14% at femoral neck in nonsmoking, physically active men with a BMI of 30?kg/m(2) to approximately 30% at both femoral sites in heavy smoking, physically inactive men with a BMI value of 18?kg/m(2) . In women also, loss rates of more than 30% were estimated in the lifestyle groups with a BMI value of 18?kg/m(2) . BMI had the strongest effect on BMD, especially in the oldest age groups, but a BMI above 30?kg/m(2) did not exert any additional effect compared with the population average BMI of 27?kg/m(2) . At the age of 80 years, a lifestyle of moderate BMI to light overweight, smoking avoidance, and physical activity of 4 hours of vigorous activity per week through adult life may result in 1 to 2 standard deviations higher BMD levels compared with a lifestyle marked by heavy smoking, inactivity, and low weight. In the prevention of osteoporosis and fracture risk, the effect of combined lifestyles through adult life should be highlighted. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.
PubMed ID
24676861 View in PubMed
Less detail

Leisure time computer use and adolescent bone health-findings from the Tromsø Study, Fit Futures: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263676
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(6):e006665
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Anne Winther
Luai Awad Ahmed
Anne-Sofie Furberg
Guri Grimnes
Rolf Jorde
Ole Andreas Nilsen
Elaine Dennison
Nina Emaus
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(6):e006665
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Low levels of physical activity may have considerable negative effects on bone health in adolescence, and increasing screen time in place of sporting activity during growth is worrying. This study explored the associations between self-reported screen time at weekends and bone mineral density (BMD).
In 2010/2011, 1038 (93%) of the region's first-year upper-secondary school students (15-18 years) attended the Tromsø Study, Fit Futures 1 (FF1). A follow-up survey (FF2) took place in 2012/2013. BMD at total hip, femoral neck and total body was measured as g/cm² by dual X-ray absorptiometry (GE Lunar prodigy). Lifestyle variables were self-reported, including questions on hours per day spent in front of television/computer during weekends and hours spent on leisure time physical activities. Complete data sets for 388/312 girls and 359/231 boys at FF1/FF2, respectively, were used in analyses. Sex stratified multiple regression analyses were performed.
Many adolescents balanced 2-4 h screen time with moderate or high physical activity levels. Screen time was positively related to body mass index (BMI) in boys (p=0.002), who spent more time in front of the computer than girls did (p
PubMed ID
26063563 View in PubMed
Less detail

More forearm fractures among urban than rural women - the NOREPOS study based on the tromsø study and the HUNT study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100106
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2010 Nov 8;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-8-2010
Author
Tone K Omsland
Luai Awad Ahmed
Anna Grønskag
Berit Schei
Nina Emaus
Arnulf Langhammer
Ragnar M Joakimsen
Lone Jørgensen
Anne Johanne Søgaard
Clara G Gjesdal
Haakon E Meyer
Author Affiliation
Department of General Practice and Community Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway; Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway. t.k.omsland@medisin.uio.no, Tone.Kristin.Omsland@fhi.no.
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2010 Nov 8;
Date
Nov-8-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Higher rates of hip fracture and all fractures combined have been observed in urban compared with rural areas, but whether there are urban-rural differences in distal forearm fracture rates is less studied. The aim of the present longitudinal study was to compare the incidence of forearm fracture in postmenopausal women in urban and rural areas in Norway, and to investigate risk factors which could explain potential fracture differences. The study included data from 11,209 women aged 65 years or more, who participated in two large health studies; The Tromsø Health Study in 1994-1995 and The Nord-Trøndelag Health Study in 1995-1997. Forearm bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by single energy x-ray absorptiometry in a subsample of women (n=7,333) at baseline. All women were followed with respect to hospital verified forearm fractures (median follow-up: 6.3 years). A total of 9,249 and 1,960 women lived in areas classified as rural and urban, respectively. Urban women had an increased forearm fracture risk, RR = 1.29 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.09-1.52) compared with women in rural areas. Rural women had higher body mass index (BMI) compared with urban women, and the RR was moderately reduced to 1.21 (95% CI: 1.02-1.43) after BMI-adjustments. Rural women had highest BMD. In the subgroup with measured BMD, adjustments for BMD changed the urban versus rural RR from 1.21 (95%CI: 0.96-1.52) to 1.05 (95%CI: 0.83-1.32), suggesting that BMD is an important explanatory factor. In conclusion, higher rates of forearm fractures was found in urban compared with rural women. © 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.
PubMed ID
21061241 View in PubMed
Less detail

16 records – page 1 of 2.