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Family history of colorectal cancer in a Sweden county.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18145
Source
Fam Cancer. 2003;2(2):87-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Louise Olsson
Annika Lindblom
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Central Hospital, Västerås, Uppsala University, Sweden, olsson@ltvastmanland.se
Source
Fam Cancer. 2003;2(2):87-93
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenomatous Polyposis Coli - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Age of Onset
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Colorectal Neoplasms, Hereditary Nonpolyposis - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Family Health
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Pedigree
Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) and familial adenomatosis polyposis (FAP) are well-known high-risk cancer syndromes. Hereditary colorectal cancer (HCRC) with at least three relatives with colorectal cancer and a dominant pattern of inheritance but with no specifications for age at onset and two close relatives with colorectal cancer (TCR) are other forms of familial clustering known to carry an increased risk of the disease. The frequency of the total burden of familial colorectal cancer is not well known. We therefore investigated the family history of 400/411 (97%) eligible patients with recently diagnosed colorectal cancer in Västmanland county, Sweden, during a 3-year period. Records or death certificates confirmed the diagnoses of relatives. Five patients (1.2%, 95% CI 0.15-2.2) were diagnosed as having HNPCC, eight (1.9%, 95% CI 0.6-3.2) as having HCRC and thirty-four (8.3%, 95% CI 5.6-11.0) were identified as having TCR. In total, 47 patients (11.4%, 95% CI 8.3-14.5) were found to have a contributing familial background. The implication is thus that every ninth patient with colorectal cancer represents a highly or intermediately increased risk of the disease among relatives. We conclude that the low frequency of individuals identified by family history alone makes the establishment of surveillance programs feasible.
PubMed ID
14574157 View in PubMed
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Ethical dilemmas around the dying patient with stroke: a qualitative interview study with team members on stroke units in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258547
Source
J Neurosci Nurs. 2014 Jun;46(3):162-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Helene Eriksson
Gisela Andersson
Louise Olsson
Anna Milberg
Maria Friedrichsen
Source
J Neurosci Nurs. 2014 Jun;46(3):162-70
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Death
Communication Barriers
Female
Hospice and Palliative Care Nursing - ethics
Humans
Male
Neuroscience Nursing - ethics
Nurses' Aides - ethics - psychology
Nursing Staff, Hospital - ethics - psychology
Nursing, Team - ethics
Palliative Care - ethics
Physical Therapists - ethics - psychology
Qualitative Research
Right to Die - ethics
Stroke - nursing - rehabilitation
Sweden
Terminal Care - ethics
Abstract
In Sweden, individuals affected by severe stroke are treated in specialized stroke units. In these units, patients are attended by a multiprofessional team with a focus on care in the acute phase of stroke, rehabilitation phase, and palliative phase. Caring for patients with such a large variety in condition and symptoms might be an extra challenge for the team. Today, there is a lack of knowledge in team experiences of the dilemmas that appear and the consequences that emerge. Therefore, the purpose of this article was to study ethical dilemmas, different approaches, and what consequences they had among healthcare professionals working with the dying patients with stroke in acute stroke units. Forty-one healthcare professionals working in a stroke team were interviewed either in focus groups or individually. The data were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using content analysis. The ethical dilemmas that appeared were depending on "nondecisions" about palliative care or discontinuation of treatments. The lack of decision made the team members act based on their own individual skills, because of the absence of common communication tools. When a decision was made, the healthcare professionals had "problems holding to the decision." The devised and applied plans could be revalued, which was described as a setback to nondecisions again. The underlying problem and theme was "communication barriers," a consequence related to the absence of common skills and consensus among the value system. This study highlights the importance of palliative care knowledge and skills, even for patients experiencing severe stroke. To make a decision and to hold on to that is a presupposition in creating a credible care plan. However, implementing a common set of values based on palliative care with symptom control and quality of life might minimize the risk of the communication barrier that may arise and increases the ability to create a healthcare that is meaningful and dignified.
PubMed ID
24796473 View in PubMed
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The glimmering embers: experiences of hope among cancer patients in palliative home care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136705
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2011 Mar;9(1):43-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Louise Olsson
Gunnel Ostlund
Peter Strang
Eva Jeppsson Grassman
Maria Friedrichsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Faculty of Health Sciences, Campus Norrköping, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden. louol@isv.liu.se
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2011 Mar;9(1):43-54
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Home Care Services
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Morale
Neoplasms - psychology
Palliative Care - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The experience of hope among cancer patients in palliative care is important information for healthcare providers, but research on the subject is sparse. The aim of this article was to explore how cancer patients admitted to palliative home care experienced the significance of hope and used hope during 6 weeks throughout the last phase of their life, and to assess their symptoms and hope status during 6 weeks throughout the last phase of their lives.
Eleven adult patients with cancer participated in 20 interviews and completed seven diaries. The participants were recruited from two palliative care units in the southeast of Sweden. The method used was Grounded Theory (GT), and analysis was based on the constant comparative method.
The core category, glimmering embers, was generated from four processes: (1) The creation of "convinced" hope, with a focus on positive events, formed in order to have something to look forward to; (2) The creation of "simulated hope," including awareness of the lack of realism, but including attempts to believe in unrealistic reasons for hope; (3) The collection of and maintaining of moments of hope, expressing a wish to "seize the day" and hold on to moments of joy and pleasure; and (4) "Gradually extinct" hope, characterized by a lack of energy and a sense of time running out.
The different processes of hope helped the patients to continue to live when they were close to death. Hope should be respected and understood by the professionals giving them support.
PubMed ID
21352617 View in PubMed
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Common variants in human CRC genes as low-risk alleles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98081
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2010 Apr;46(6):1041-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Simone Picelli
Pawel Zajac
Xiao-Lei Zhou
David Edler
Claes Lenander
Johan Dalén
Fredrik Hjern
Nils Lundqvist
Ulrik Lindforss
Lars Påhlman
Kennet Smedh
Anders Törnqvist
Jörn Holm
Martin Janson
Magnus Andersson
Susanne Ekelund
Louise Olsson
Joakim Lundeberg
Annika Lindblom
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2010 Apr;46(6):1041-8
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alleles
Case-Control Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
Germ-Line Mutation - genetics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Penetrance
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The genetic susceptibility to colorectal cancer (CRC) has been estimated to be around 35% and yet high-penetrance germline mutations found so far explain less than 5% of all cases. Much of the remaining variations could be due to the co-inheritance of multiple low penetrant variants. The identification of all the susceptibility alleles could have public health relevance in the near future. To test the hypothesis that what are considered polymorphisms in human CRC genes could constitute low-risk alleles, we selected eight common SNPs for a pilot association study in 1785 cases and 1722 controls. One SNP, rs3219489:G>C (MUTYH Q324H) seemed to confer an increased risk of rectal cancer in homozygous status (OR=1.52; CI=1.06-2.17). When the analysis was restricted to our 'super-controls', healthy individuals with no family history for cancer, also rs1799977:A>G (MLH1 I219V) was associated with an increased risk in both colon and rectum patients with an odds ratio of 1.28 (CI=1.02-1.60) and 1.34 (CI=1.05-1.72), respectively (under the dominant model); while 2 SNPs, rs1800932:A>G (MSH6 P92P) and rs459552:T>A (APC D1822V) seemed to confer a protective effect. The latter, in particular showed an odds ratio of 0.76 (CI=0.60-0.97) among colon patients and 0.73 (CI=0.56-0.95) among rectal patients. In conclusion, our study suggests that common variants in human CRC genes could constitute low-risk alleles.
PubMed ID
20149637 View in PubMed
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