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Endoscopic follow-up of positive fecal occult blood testing in the Ontario FOBT Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162981
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2007 Jun;21(6):379-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Lawrence Paszat
Linda Rabeneck
Lori Kiefer
Verna Mai
Paul Ritvo
Terry Sullivan
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Canada. lawrence.paszat@ices.on.ca
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2007 Jun;21(6):379-82
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Colonoscopy
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Occult Blood
Ontario - epidemiology
Abstract
The Ontario FOBT Project is a pilot study of fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) for colorectal cancer screening conducted among age-eligible volunteers (50 to 75 years) in 12 of 37 public health regions in Ontario.
Volunteers responded to invitations from primary care practitioners (PCPs) in six regions, and from public health programs in the remaining regions. FOBT collection kits were distributed from routine laboratory specimen collection sites, to which completed kits were returned. Results were sent to PCPs in all 12 regions, with copies sent to the study office at Cancer Care Ontario (Toronto, Ontario). Follow-up of positive results was at the discretion of the PCPs. The study files contained the unique Ontario Health Insurance Numbers, the date of the analyses, the number of satisfactory slides and the results for each slide. The Ontario Health Insurance Numbers were encrypted for each participant, and along with the study file, were linked to medical billing claims, hospital records and aggregate demographic data.
Among participants with positive results (men 3.5% and women 2.2%), the median time from date of FOBT analysis to date of colonoscopy was 121 days among men and 202 days among women. At the end of follow-up, after positive FOBT (six to 17 months), 73% of men and 56% of women had proceeded to colonoscopy.
Although colonoscopy appeared to be acceptable to the majority of participants with positive FOBT, accessibility problems was the likely explanation for lengthy intervals between the date of positive FOBT and its performance. Differences between the experiences of men and women require further investigation.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17571172 View in PubMed
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Fostering evidence-based decision-making in Canada: examining the need for a Canadian population and public health evidence centre and research network.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174640
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 May-Jun;96(3):I1-40 following 200
Publication Type
Article

Prevalence and predictors of urethral chlamydia and gonorrhea infection in male inmates in an Ontario correctional facility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133344
Source
Can J Public Health. 2011 May-Jun;102(3):220-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Fiona G Kouyoumdjian
Cheryl Main
Liviana M Calzavara
Lori Kiefer
Author Affiliation
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, 155 College Street, Toronto, ON M5T 3M7. fiona.kouyoumdjian@utoronto.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2011 May-Jun;102(3):220-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Gonorrhea - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Mass Screening
Multivariate Analysis
Ontario - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prisoners - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Urethral Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Abstract
To determine the prevalence of urethral chlamydia and gonorrhea in males in a correctional facility in Ontario, Canada, and to explore risk factors for infection.
Between June and December, 2009, 500 adult males who had been newly admitted at a correctional facility in southern Ontario completed a survey of risk factors and provided a urine sample for testing. Those who tested positive were treated and their names were provided to the local public health unit for follow-up including contact tracing. Prevalence and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for infection with chlamydia and gonorrhea, respectively, and a multivariable model was used to look at risk factors for infection.
The study population reported high levels of sexual risk behaviours and drug use. The overall chlamydia prevalence was 2.9% (95% CI 1.6-4.8) and the overall gonorrhea prevalence was 0.6% (95% CI 0.1-1.8). Rates were particularly high for chlamydia in younger males, at 16% (95% CI 4.5-36) in 18-19 year olds and 3.7% (95% CI 1.0-9.3) in 20-24 year olds, and for gonorrhea in males aged 20-24 at 1.9% (95% CI 0.2-6.6). A multivariable logistic regression model revealed that though not statistically significant, younger age was associated with infection.
The relatively high prevalence of chlamydia and gonorrhea found in this study suggests that primary and secondary prevention programs should be instituted for males in correctional facilities, in particular among younger inmates. Further research is required to ensure internal and external generalizability of these results, as well as to determine the cost-effectiveness of potential interventions.
PubMed ID
21714323 View in PubMed
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Simplicity within complexity: seasonality and predictability of hospital admissions in the province of Ontario 1988-2001, a population-based analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176299
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2005 Feb 4;5(1):13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-4-2005
Author
Ross E G Upshur
Rahim Moineddin
Eric Crighton
Lori Kiefer
Muhammad Mamdani
Author Affiliation
Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, 263 McCaul Street, Toronto, ON M5T 1W7, Canada. rupshur@idirect.com
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2005 Feb 4;5(1):13
Date
Feb-4-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease - epidemiology
Bronchiolitis - epidemiology
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology
Coronary Artery Disease - epidemiology
Dehydration - epidemiology
Forecasting
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data - trends
Hospitals - utilization
Humans
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data - trends
Population Surveillance - methods
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Seasons
Time Factors
Utilization Review - methods
Abstract
Seasonality is a common feature of communicable diseases. Less well understood is whether seasonal patterns occur for non-communicable diseases. The overall effect of seasonal fluctuations on hospital admissions has not been systematically evaluated.
This study employed time series methods on a population based retrospective cohort of for the fifty two most common causes of hospital admissions in the province of Ontario from 1988-2001. Seasonal patterns were assessed by spectral analysis and autoregressive methods. Predictive models were fit with regression techniques.
The results show that 33 of the 52 most common admission diagnoses are moderately or strongly seasonal in occurrence; 96.5% of the predicted values were within the 95% confidence interval, with 37 series having all values within the 95% confidence interval.
The study shows that hospital admissions have systematic patterns that can be understood and predicted with reasonable accuracy. These findings have implications for understanding disease etiology and health care policy and planning.
Notes
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PubMed ID
15693997 View in PubMed
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