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Adaptation to the birth of a child with a congenital anomaly: a prospective longitudinal study of maternal well-being and psychological distress.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259696
Source
Dev Psychol. 2014 Jun;50(6):1827-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Ragnhild B Nes
Espen Røysamb
Lars J Hauge
Tom Kornstad
Markus A Landolt
Lorentz M Irgens
Leif Eskedal
Petter Kristensen
Margarete E Vollrath
Source
Dev Psychol. 2014 Jun;50(6):1827-39
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Checklist
Child, Preschool
Cleft Lip - psychology
Cohort Studies
Down Syndrome - psychology
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Models, Statistical
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology
Norway
Personal Satisfaction
Pregnancy
Stress, Psychological - physiopathology
Abstract
This study explores the stability and change in maternal life satisfaction and psychological distress following the birth of a child with a congenital anomaly using 5 assessments from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study collected from Pregnancy Week 17 to 36 months postpartum. Participating mothers were divided into those having infants with (a) Down syndrome (DS; n = 114), (b) cleft lip/palate (CLP; n = 179), and (c) no disability (ND; n = 99,122). Responses on the Satisfaction With Life Scale and a short version of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist were analyzed using structural equation modeling, including latent growth curves. Satisfaction and distress levels were highly diverse in the sample, but fairly stable over time (retest correlations: .47-.68). However, the birth of a child with DS was associated with a rapid decrease in maternal life satisfaction and a corresponding increase in psychological distress observed between pregnancy and 6 months postpartum. The unique effects from DS on changes in satisfaction (Cohen's d = -.66) and distress (Cohen's d = .60) remained stable. Higher distress and lower life satisfaction at later assessments appeared to reflect a persistent burden that was already experienced 6 months after birth. CLP had a temporary impact (Cohen's d = .29) on maternal distress at 6 months. However, the overall trajectories did not differ between CLP and ND mothers. In sum, the birth of a child with DS influences maternal psychological distress and life satisfaction throughout the toddler period, whereas a curable condition like CLP has only a minor temporary effect on maternal psychological distress.
PubMed ID
24588521 View in PubMed
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Adverse perinatal outcome and later kidney biopsy in the mother.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46939
Source
J Am Soc Nephrol. 2006 Mar;17(3):837-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Bjørn Egil Vikse
Lorentz M Irgens
Leif Bostad
Bjarne M Iversen
Author Affiliation
Renal Research Group, Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, and The Norwegian Kidney Biopsy Registry, Department of Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, 5021 Bergen, Norway. bjorn.vikse@med.uib.no
Source
J Am Soc Nephrol. 2006 Mar;17(3):837-45
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Strong associations of adverse perinatal outcomes have been identified with later cardiovascular disease in the mother. Few studies have addressed associations with kidney disease. This study investigated whether perinatal outcomes are associated with later clinical kidney disease as diagnosed by kidney biopsy. The Medical Birth Registry of Norway contains data on all childbirths in Norway since 1967. The Norwegian Kidney Biopsy Registry contains data on all kidney biopsies in Norway since 1988. All women with a first singleton delivery from 1967 to 1998 were included. Pregnancy-related predictors of later kidney biopsy were analyzed by Cox regression analyses. A total of 756,420 women were included, and after a mean period of 15.9+/-9.4 yr, 588 had a kidney biopsy. Compared with women without preeclampsia and with offspring with birth weight of >or=2.5 kg, women with no preeclampsia and with offspring with birth weight of 1.5 to 2.5 kg had a relative risk (RR) for a later kidney biopsy of 1.7, women with no preeclampsia and with offspring with birth weight of or=2.5 kg had an RR of 2.5, women with preeclampsia and with offspring with a birth weight of 1.5 to 2.5 kg had an RR of 4.5, and women with preeclampsia and with offspring with a birth weight of
PubMed ID
16421228 View in PubMed
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Are adverse pregnancy outcomes risk factors for development of end-stage renal disease in women with diabetes?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96871
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2010 May 20;
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-2010
Author
Miriam K Sandvik
Bjarne M Iversen
Lorentz M Irgens
Rolv Skjaerven
Torbjørn Leivestad
Eirik Søfteland
Bjørn Egil Vikse
Author Affiliation
1Renal Research Group, Institute of Medicine.
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2010 May 20;
Date
May-20-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Background. It is unknown whether adverse pregnancy-related outcomes in women with pregestational diabetes are associated with later development of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) or death. Methods. We linked data from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway with data from the Norwegian Renal Registry and the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry. Data from up to three pregnancies for women with a first singleton delivery from 1967 to 1994 were included and analysed in a cohort design using Cox regression. Results. Altogether, 639 018 women were included in the analyses, among whom 2204 women had diabetes mellitus before pregnancy. Their first pregnancy was complicated by pre-eclampsia in 13.2%, low birth weight offspring (
PubMed ID
20494895 View in PubMed
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Associations of Birth Defects with Adult Intellectual Performance, Disability and Mortality: Population-based Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76050
Source
Pediatr Res. 2006 Apr 26;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-26-2006
Author
Martha G Eide
Rolv Skjæven
Lorentz M Irgens
Tor Bjerkdal
Nina Oyen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, The Medical Birth Registry of Norway, University of Bergen, N-5018 Bergen, Norway; Division of Military Research and Development, Joint Norwegian Medical Services, N-0753 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Pediatr Res. 2006 Apr 26;
Date
Apr-26-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Infants born with birth defects have poorer outcomes in terms of mortality and disability, but the long-term intellectual outcome in children with birth defects is generally unknown. We assessed the long-term associations of various birth defects with mortality and disability, and evaluated whether high mortality and disability were reflected in impaired intellectual performance at age 18. In this nationwide cohort study, records of 9,186 males with and 384,384 without birth defects, registered in the Medical Birth Registry of Norway (1967-1979) were linked to the National Conscript Service (1984-1999). Mortality and disability before military draft, and intelligence test score at conscription were the main outcome measures. Males with birth defects had a relative risk for disability of 6.0 compared with males without defects. Disability was low within categories of birth defects associated with low mortality, and high within defect categories associated with high mortality. The relative risk for not being drafted was highest if maternal educational level was low. Heart defects and cleft palate were the only subgroups in which intellectual performance was lower after adjustment for maternal education, maternal age, marital status and birth order. In particular, intellectual performance was not impaired among those with multiple compared with single defects. We conclude that for the majority of birth defect categories in the present birth cohort, our hypothesis that intellectual performance would be impaired was not confirmed. Thus, there seems to be little reason to fear an adverse intellectual outcome in non-disabled surviving infants with birth defects.
PubMed ID
16641211 View in PubMed
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Birth weight and hearing impairment in norwegians born from 1967 to 1993.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31403
Source
Pediatrics. 2002 Sep;110(3):e30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Per Nafstad
Sven O Samuelsen
Lorentz M Irgens
Tor Bjerkedal
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. per.nafstad@fhi.no
Source
Pediatrics. 2002 Sep;110(3):e30
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Female
Hearing Disorders - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To estimate the association between birth weight and hearing impairment among Norwegians born between 1967 and 1993, taking other pregnancy-related conditions into consideration. METHODS: A cohort study was conducted of all Norwegian live births from 1967 to 1993 (n = 1 548 429) linking information of the Medical Birth Registry of Norway and the register for the National Insurance Administration, which covers all Norwegians. The Medical Birth Registry of Norway has recorded information on birth weight and other pregnancy-related conditions as well as diseases of the mother before and during pregnancy. The register of the National Insurance Administration contains information on all Norwegians who have received cash benefits for a disease/disability, including hearing impairment. Data up to 1997 are included; thus, the follow-up period varies between 29 and 3 years. RESULTS: The occurrence of hearing impairment was 11 per 10 000, decreasing from 60 per 10 000 for birth weights 4499 g. Compared with birth weights between 3000 g and 3499 g, the adjusted rate ratio of hearing impairment was 7.55 (95% confidence interval: 4.81-11.87) for birth weights 4499 g. The association did not change substantially with adjustment for other pregnancy-related conditions. Restricting the analyses to term born, the association between hearing impairment and low birth weight became stronger. CONCLUSIONS: Birth weight was a strong predictor of hearing impairment in the Norwegian population. Children who were born at term with a low birth weight seemed to be a particularly vulnerable group.
PubMed ID
12205280 View in PubMed
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Birthweight and work participation in adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58269
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2004 Aug;33(4):849-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Petter Kristensen
Tor Bjerkedal
Lorentz M Irgens
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Occupational Health, PO Box 8149, 0033 Oslo, Norway. petter.kristensen@stami.no
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2004 Aug;33(4):849-56
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Socioeconomic Factors
Unemployment
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In a number of studies, birthweight has been associated with cognition and educational attainment into adult age. However, the association is not clear between birthweight and work participation in adulthood. We investigated this association assessing to which extent it was influenced by circumstances concerning family background or disease in early life. METHODS: Through linkage between several national registers containing personal information from birth into adult age we established a longitudinal, population-based cohort study. Study participants were all 308 829 singletons born in Norway in 1967-1971 as registered by the Medical Birth Registry of Norway who were national residents at age 29. The study outcome was unemployment defined as a lack of personal income among people who were not under education in the calendar year of their 29th birthday as registered by the National Insurance Administration and Statistics Norway. RESULTS: Birthweight below the standardized mean was associated with unemployment. The risk of unemployment increased by decreasing birthweight for both women and men and also after adjustment for potential confounding factors. The association was evident both in people with or without social disadvantage, as well as people with or without childhood disease. Still, birthweight below the standardized mean explained much less of the unemployment risk than did social disadvantage (attributable fractions 8.0% versus 28.3% for women and 10.0% versus 40.2% for men). CONCLUSION: Birthweight below the standardized mean was independently associated with unemployment at age 29, also in the normal birthweight range.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Epidemiol. 2004 Aug;33(4):856-715166198
PubMed ID
15166206 View in PubMed
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Breech delivery and intelligence: a population-based study of 8,738 breech infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58210
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2005 Jan;105(1):4-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Martha G Eide
Nina Øyen
Rolv Skjaerven
Lorentz M Irgens
Tor Bjerkedal
Stein Tore Nilsen
Author Affiliation
Section for Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway. martha.eide@mfr.uib.no
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2005 Jan;105(1):4-11
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth Order
Birth weight
Breech Presentation
Cesarean Section
Delivery, Obstetric
Educational Status
Extraction, Obstetrical
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Intelligence
Intelligence Tests
Male
Marital status
Maternal Age
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Long-term intellectual performance in breech-presented infants may be negatively affected by vaginal delivery. We evaluated the effect of presentation at birth and delivery mode on intellectual performance at age 18 years in a nationwide population study. METHODS: We studied 8,738 male infants in breech and 384,832 males in cephalic presentation registered in the Medical Birth Registry of Norway, 1967-1979, and linked to data registered at the National Conscript Service, 1984-1999. Test scores of intelligence testing at conscription were presented as standard nine ("stanine") scores. Mean stanine scores and odds ratios of low score were computed and adjusted for birth order, maternal age, and education. RESULTS: Mean stanine score was slightly higher among breech-presented males than among cephalic-presented males (5.26 versus 5.22, P = .05), whereas after adjustment the difference disappeared (P = .3). Breech-presented infants had lower mean scores if delivered by cesarean compared with vaginal breech delivery (P = .03), and cephalic-presented males scored lower if their mothers had a cesarean delivery instead of a vaginal delivery (P
PubMed ID
15625134 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular mortality after pre-eclampsia in one child mothers: prospective, population based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118625
Source
BMJ. 2012;345:e7677
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Rolv Skjaerven
Allen J Wilcox
Kari Klungsøyr
Lorentz M Irgens
Bjørn Egil Vikse
Lars J Vatten
Rolv Terje Lie
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. rolv.skjaerven@smis.uib.no
Source
BMJ. 2012;345:e7677
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth Order
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - mortality
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Age
Norway - epidemiology
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Survival Rate - trends
Abstract
To assess the association of pre-eclampsia with later cardiovascular death in mothers according to their lifetime number of pregnancies, and particularly after only one child.
Prospective, population based cohort study.
Medical Birth Registry of Norway.
We followed 836,147 Norwegian women with a first singleton birth between 1967 and 2002 for cardiovascular mortality through linkage to the national Cause of Death Registry. About 23,000 women died by 2009, of whom 3891 died from cardiovascular causes. Associations between pre-eclampsia and cardiovascular death were assessed by hazard ratios, estimated by Cox regression analyses. Hazard ratios were adjusted for maternal education (three categories), maternal age at first birth, and year of first birth
The rate of cardiovascular mortality among women with preterm pre-eclampsia was 9.2% after having only one child, falling to 1.1% for those with two or more children. With term pre-eclampsia, the rates were 2.8% and 1.1%, respectively. Women with pre-eclampsia in their first pregnancy had higher rates of cardiovascular death than those who did not have the condition at first birth (adjusted hazard ratio 1.6 (95% confidence interval 1.4 to 2.0) after term pre-eclampsia; 3.7 (2.7 to 4.8) after preterm pre-eclampsia). Among women with only one lifetime pregnancy, the increase in risk of cardiovascular death was higher than for those with two or more children (3.4 (2.6 to 4.6) after term pre-eclampsia; 9.4 (6.5 to 13.7) after preterm pre-eclampsia). The risk of cardiovascular death was only moderately elevated among women with pre-eclamptic first pregnancies who went on to have additional children (1.5 (1.2 to 2.0) after term pre-eclampsia; 2.4 (1.5 to 3.9) after preterm pre-eclampsia). There was little evidence of additional risk after recurrent pre-eclampsia. All cause mortality for women with two or more lifetime births, who had pre-eclampsia in first pregnancy, was not elevated, even with preterm pre-eclampsia in first pregnancy (1.1 (0.87 to 1.14)).
Cardiovascular death in women with pre-eclampsia in their first pregnancy is concentrated mainly in women with no additional births. This association might be due to health problems that discourage or prevent further pregnancies rather than to pre-eclampsia itself. As a screening criterion for cardiovascular disease risk, pre-eclampsia is a strong predictor primarily among women with only one child-particularly with preterm pre-eclampsia.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23186909 View in PubMed
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Cerebral palsy and neonatal death in term singletons born small for gestational age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118821
Source
Pediatrics. 2012 Dec;130(6):e1629-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Magne Stoknes
Guro L Andersen
Magnus Odin Dahlseng
Jon Skranes
Kjell Å Salvesen
Lorentz M Irgens
Jennifer J Kurinczuk
Torstein Vik
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. magne.stoknes@gmail.com
Source
Pediatrics. 2012 Dec;130(6):e1629-35
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Apgar score
Birth weight
Cause of Death
Cerebral Palsy - mortality
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Congenital Abnormalities - mortality
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - mortality
Gestational Age
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Male
Norway
Obstetric Labor Complications - mortality
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - mortality
Registries
Risk factors
Software Design
Stillbirth
Abstract
To investigate the probable timing of events leading to cerebral palsy (CP) in singletons born small for gestational age (SGA) at term, taking neonatal death into consideration.
In this registry-based cohort study, data on 400 488 singletons born during 1996-2003 were abstracted from the Medical Birth and the CP registries of Norway. Among 36 604 SGA children (birth weight
PubMed ID
23166338 View in PubMed
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Cesarean section and maternal education; secular trends in Norway, 1967-2004.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162655
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2007;86(7):840-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Mette C Tollånes
John M D Thompson
Anne K Daltveit
Lorentz M Irgens
Author Affiliation
Section for Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway. mette.tollanes@isf.uib.no
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2007;86(7):840-8
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data - trends
Cohort Studies
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Norway
Pregnancy
Retrospective Studies
Risk
Abstract
Worldwide rising cesarean section rates over the past decades have caused much concern. Studies on the association between cesarean section and maternal social background have reported conflicting results.
A cohort study, comprising 837,312 birth order one deliveries notified to the population-based Medical Birth Registry of Norway during 1967-2004. The relative risk of cesarean section (from 1988 onwards planned and emergency cesarean section) according to maternal educational level was assessed in all deliveries, in an obstetric low-risk group and within groups of medical/obstetric high-risk conditions.
Throughout the study period, the lowest educated had the highest risk of cesarean section, followed by the medium educational group. In all deliveries, the adjusted relative risk of cesarean section for the lowest versus the highest educated increased from 1.16 (95% CI 1.09-1.23) in the 1967-76 period to 1.34 (95% CI 1.27-1.42) in the 1996-2004 period, and in the obstetric low risk group from 1.19 (95% CI 1.10-1.30) to 1.50 (95% CI 1.38-1.63). From 1988 onwards, the lowest educated had the highest risk of both planned and emergency cesarean section, followed by the medium educational group.
The lowest educated had the highest risk of cesarean section, followed by the medium educational group, and the differences gradually increased during 1967-2004. This trend could be accounted for by increasing vulnerability of the lowest educational group due to a strong social migration, and by increased occurrence of cesarean section on maternal request among the lowest educated in recent years.
PubMed ID
17611830 View in PubMed
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54 records – page 1 of 6.