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2-h postchallenge plasma glucose predicts cardiovascular events in patients with myocardial infarction without known diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121853
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Loghman Henareh
Stefan Agewall
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. loghman.henareh@karolinska.se
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:93
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina, Unstable - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Stroke - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The incidence of cardiovascular events remains high in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) despite advances in current therapies. New and better methods for identifying patients at high risk of recurrent cardiovascular (CV) events are needed. This study aimed to analyze the predictive value of an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in patients with acute myocardial infarction without known diabetes mellitus (DM).
The prospective cohort study consisted of 123 men and women aged between 31-80 years who had suffered a previous MI 3-12 months before the examinations. The exclusion criteria were known diabetes mellitus. Patients were followed up over 6.03???1.36 years for CV death, recurrent MI, stroke and unstable angina pectoris. A standard OGTT was performed at baseline.
2-h plasma glucose (HR, 1.27, 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.62; P?
Notes
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PubMed ID
22873202 View in PubMed
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Echogenicity of the carotid intima-media complex and cardiovascular risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121999
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2012 Sep;32(5):400-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Jonathan De Blois
Einar Stranden
Tomas Jogestrand
Loghman Henareh
Stefan Agewall
Author Affiliation
Centre Hospitalier Affilié Universitaire de Québec, Québec, Canada. jonathan.deblois@med.ulaval.ca
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2012 Sep;32(5):400-3
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biological Markers - blood
Carotid Artery Diseases - blood - epidemiology - ultrasonography
Carotid Artery, Common - ultrasonography
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Coronary Artery Disease - blood - epidemiology
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Increased carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) has been associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke. A measure of echogenicity, the grey scale median (GSM), has been shown to be inversely correlated with cardiovascular risk factors and to be predictive of mortality in a community-based cohort. We assessed the factors associated with carotid IM-GSM in younger, non-diabetic patients with a recent MI.
A total of 122 patients (women, 25%) aged 31-80 years (61) were recruited 2-3 days after an acute MI. Ultrasound examinations of the carotid arteries were performed 1-12 months after the MI. IMT was 0·78 (SD 0·17) mm on the right side and 0·81 (0·20) mm on the left side (P = 0·05). GSM was 88·60 (range 46-132, SD 18·32) on the right side and 82·10 (40-126, 17·89) on the left side (P = 0·002). Triglycerides (TG) correlated with GSM on both sides (right, r = -0·27, P = 0·003; left, r = -0·18, P = 0·05). On the right side, GSM was 92·15 and 82·26 (P = 0·05) in patients with TG
PubMed ID
22856348 View in PubMed
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Intima-media complex of both the brachial artery and the common carotid artery are associated with left ventricular hypertrophy in patients with previous myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53227
Source
J Hypertens. 2005 Jan;23(1):119-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Stefan Agewall
Loghman Henareh
Tomas Jogestrand
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Huddinge University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. stefan.agewall@kus.se
Source
J Hypertens. 2005 Jan;23(1):119-25
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Brachial Artery - pathology - ultrasonography
Carotid Artery, Common - pathology - ultrasonography
Cross-Sectional Studies
Echocardiography
Female
Humans
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - complications - pathology - ultrasonography
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - complications
Regression Analysis
Tunica Intima - pathology
Tunica Media - pathology
Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Prospective trials have established intima-media thickness (IMT) of the carotid artery, flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery and cardiac left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) as predictors of cardiovascular events. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between intima-media complex of the brachial artery to FMD, intima-media complex of the common carotid artery and cardiac hypertrophy in patients with coronary heart disease. METHODS AND PROCEDURES: Cross-sectional design. Procedures were undertaken within the Huddinge University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. A total of 123 patients with a previous acute myocardial infarction (MI) were investigated. Calculated intima-media area (cIMa) of the brachial and common carotid arteries and FMD of the brachial artery and left ventricular dimensions were examined. RESULTS: The brachial cIMa was significantly associated with age, p-triglycerides, common carotid cIMa, ejection fraction, septum thickness, posterior wall thickness and left ventricular mass index (P
Notes
Comment In: J Hypertens. 2005 Jan;23(1):37-915643121
PubMed ID
15643133 View in PubMed
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Plasma catecholamine levels in patients with takotsubo syndrome: Implications for the pathogenesis of the disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273062
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2015 Feb 15;181:35-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-2015

Prevalence of Anxiety and Depression Symptoms in Patients with Myocardial Infarction with Non-Obstructive Coronary Arteries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303017
Source
Am J Med. 2018 09; 131(9):1118-1124
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-2018
Author
Maria Daniel
Stefan Agewall
Felix Berglund
Kenneth Caidahl
Olov Collste
Christina Ekenbäck
Mats Frick
Loghman Henareh
Tomas Jernberg
Karin Malmqvist
Karin Schenck-Gustafsson
Jonas Spaak
Örjan Sundin
Peder Sörensson
Shams Y-Hassan
Claes Hofman-Bang
Per Tornvall
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: dr.maria.daniel@gmail.com.
Source
Am J Med. 2018 09; 131(9):1118-1124
Date
09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Anxiety - diagnosis - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Sweden - epidemiology
Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Myocardial infarction with non-obstructive coronary arteries is a working diagnosis for several heart disorders. Previous studies on anxiety and depression in patients with myocardial infarction with non-obstructive coronary arteries are lacking. Our aim was to investigate the prevalence of anxiety and depression among patients with myocardial infarction with non-obstructive coronary arteries.
We included 99 patients with myocardial infarction with non-obstructive coronary arteries together with age- and sex-matched control groups who completed the Beck Depression Inventory and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) 3 months after the acute event.
Using the Beck Depression Inventory, we found that the prevalence of depression in patients with myocardial infarction with non-obstructive coronary arteries (35%) was higher than in healthy controls (9%; P = .006) and similar to that of patients with coronary heart disease (30%; P = .954). Using the HADS anxiety subscale, we found that the prevalence of anxiety in patients with myocardial infarction with non-obstructive coronary arteries (27%) was higher than in healthy controls (9%; P = .002) and similar to that of patients with coronary heart disease (21%; P = .409). Using the HADS depression subscale, we found that the prevalence of depression in patients with myocardial infarction with non-obstructive coronary arteries (17%) was higher than in healthy controls (4%; P = .003) and similar to that of patients with coronary heart disease (13%; P = .466). Patients with myocardial infarction with non-obstructive coronary arteries and takotsubo syndrome scored higher on the HADS anxiety subscale than those without (P = .028).
This is the first study on the mental health of patients with myocardial infarction with non-obstructive coronary arteries to show that prevalence rates of anxiety and depression are similar to those in patients with coronary heart disease.
PubMed ID
29859805 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of Myocardial Bridging in Patients With Myocardial Infarction and Nonobstructed Coronary Arteries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270968
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2015 Dec 15;116(12):1833-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2015
Author
Elin B Brolin
Torkel B Brismar
Olov Collste
Shams Y-Hassan
Loghman Henareh
Per Tornvall
Kerstin Cederlund
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2015 Dec 15;116(12):1833-9
Date
Dec-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Vessels - radiography
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Bridging - complications - epidemiology - radiography
Myocardial Infarction - etiology - radiography
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
Mechanisms of acute myocardial infarction and nonobstructed coronary arteries (MINOCA) are incompletely understood. Myocardial bridging (MB) is usually considered a benign congenital variant, but serious complications have been reported. MB has also been proposed as a cause of takotsubo syndrome (TS). We aimed to examine whether MB was more frequent in patients with MINOCA or TS than in age- and gender-matched controls and to compare the MB detection rates of coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) and invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Patients with MINOCA (n = 57) and age- and gender-matched controls (n = 58), aged 45 to 70 were enrolled. Myocarditis was excluded by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. Patients with TS (n = 15) were considered as a subgroup and therefore not excluded. Patients with MINOCA underwent ICA and all study participants underwent coronary CTA. All examinations were reviewed with focus on MB. Among 57 MINOCA patients, 15 MINOCA patients with TS and 58 controls, MB was demonstrated in 28 patients (49%), 8 patients (53%), and 26 patients (45%), respectively. There were no statistically significant differences regarding the prevalence of MB or the type, location, length, or thickness of MB. There was a statistically significant difference (p
PubMed ID
26506121 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.