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Indexing Permafrost Soil Organic Matter Degradation Using High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263663
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(6):e0130557
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Benjamin F Mann
Hongmei Chen
Elizabeth M Herndon
Rosalie K Chu
Nikola Tolic
Evan F Portier
Taniya Roy Chowdhury
Errol W Robinson
Stephen J Callister
Stan D Wullschleger
David E Graham
Liyuan Liang
Baohua Gu
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(6):e0130557
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Microbial degradation of soil organic matter (SOM) is a key process for terrestrial carbon cycling, although the molecular details of these transformations remain unclear. This study reports the application of ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry to profile the molecular composition of SOM and its degradation during a simulated warming experiment. A soil sample, collected near Barrow, Alaska, USA, was subjected to a 40-day incubation under anoxic conditions and analyzed before and after the incubation to determine changes of SOM composition. A CHO index based on molecular C, H, and O data was utilized to codify SOM components according to their observed degradation potentials. Compounds with a CHO index score between -1 and 0 in a water-soluble fraction (WSF) demonstrated high degradation potential, with a highest shift of CHO index occurred in the N-containing group of compounds, while similar stoichiometries in a base-soluble fraction (BSF) did not. Additionally, compared with the classical H:C vs O:C van Krevelen diagram, CHO index allowed for direct visualization of the distribution of heteroatoms such as N in the identified SOM compounds. We demonstrate that CHO index is useful not only in characterizing arctic SOM at the molecular level but also enabling quantitative description of SOM degradation, thereby facilitating incorporation of the high resolution MS datasets to future mechanistic models of SOM degradation and prediction of greenhouse gas emissions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26068586 View in PubMed
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Microbial Community and Functional Gene Changes in Arctic Tundra Soils in a Microcosm Warming Experiment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285900
Source
Front Microbiol. 2017;8:1741
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Ziming Yang
Sihang Yang
Joy D Van Nostrand
Jizhong Zhou
Wei Fang
Qi Qi
Yurong Liu
Stan D Wullschleger
Liyuan Liang
David E Graham
Yunfeng Yang
Baohua Gu
Source
Front Microbiol. 2017;8:1741
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Microbial decomposition of soil organic carbon (SOC) in thawing Arctic permafrost is important in determining greenhouse gas feedbacks of tundra ecosystems to climate. However, the changes in microbial community structure during SOC decomposition are poorly known. Here we examine these changes using frozen soils from Barrow, Alaska, USA, in anoxic microcosm incubation at -2 and 8°C for 122 days. The functional gene array GeoChip was used to determine microbial community structure and the functional genes associated with SOC degradation, methanogenesis, and Fe(III) reduction. Results show that soil incubation after 122 days at 8°C significantly decreased functional gene abundance (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
28974946 View in PubMed
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Molecular Insights into Arctic Soil Organic Matter Degradation under Warming.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290621
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2018 Apr 17; 52(8):4555-4564
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-17-2018
Author
Hongmei Chen
Ziming Yang
Rosalie K Chu
Nikola Tolic
Liyuan Liang
David E Graham
Stan D Wullschleger
Baohua Gu
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemistry , Oakland University , Rochester , Michigan 48309 , United States.
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2018 Apr 17; 52(8):4555-4564
Date
Apr-17-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Molecular composition of the Arctic soil organic carbon (SOC) and its susceptibility to microbial degradation are uncertain due to heterogeneity and unknown SOC compositions. Using ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry, we determined the susceptibility and compositional changes of extractable dissolved organic matter (EDOM) in an anoxic warming incubation experiment (up to 122 days) with a tundra soil from Alaska (United States). EDOM was extracted with 10 mM NH4HCO3 from both the organic- and mineral-layer soils during incubation at both -2 and 8 °C. Based on their O:C and H:C ratios, EDOM molecular formulas were qualitatively grouped into nine biochemical classes of compounds, among which lignin-like compounds dominated both the organic and the mineral soils and were the most stable, whereas amino sugars, peptides, and carbohydrate-like compounds were the most biologically labile. These results corresponded with shifts in EDOM elemental composition in which the ratios of O:C and N:C decreased, while the average C content in EDOM, molecular mass, and aromaticity increased after 122 days of incubation. This research demonstrates that certain EDOM components, such as amino sugars, peptides, and carbohydrate-like compounds, are disproportionately more susceptible to microbial degradation than others in the soil, and these results should be considered in SOC degradation models to improve predictions of Arctic climate feedbacks.
PubMed ID
29569920 View in PubMed
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Stoichiometry and temperature sensitivity of methanogenesis and CO2 production from saturated polygonal tundra in Barrow, Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257286
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2014 Oct 10;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-10-2014
Author
Taniya Roy Chowdhury
Elizabeth M Herndon
Tommy J Phelps
Dwayne A Elias
Baohua Gu
Liyuan Liang
Stan D Wullschleger
David E Graham
Author Affiliation
Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, MS-6038, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831.
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2014 Oct 10;
Date
Oct-10-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Arctic permafrost ecosystems store ~ 50% of global belowground carbon (C) that is vulnerable to increased microbial degradation with warmer active layer temperatures and thawing of the near surface permafrost. We used anoxic laboratory incubations to estimate anaerobic CO2 production and methanogenesis in active layer (organic and mineral soil horizons) and permafrost samples from center, ridge and trough positions of water-saturated low-centered polygon in Barrow Environmental Observatory, AK, USA. Methane (CH4 ) and carbon dioxide (CO2 ) production rates and concentrations were determined at -2, +4, or +8 °C for 60 day incubation period. Temporal dynamics of CO2 production and methanogenesis at -2 °C showed evidence of fundamentally different mechanisms of substrate limitation and inhibited microbial growth at soil water freezing points compared to warmer temperatures. Non-linear regression better modeled the initial rates and estimates of Q10 values for CO2 that showed higher sensitivity in the organic-rich soils of polygon center and trough than the relatively drier ridge soils. Methanogenesis generally exhibited a lag phase in the mineral soils and was significantly longer at -2 °C in all horizons. Such discontinuity in CH4 production between -2 °C and the elevated temperatures (+4 and +8 °C) indicated the insufficient representation of methanogenesis on the basis of Q10 values estimated from both linear and non-linear models. Production rates for both CH4 and CO2 were substantially higher in organic horizons (20 to 40% wt. C) at all temperatures relative to mineral horizons (
PubMed ID
25308891 View in PubMed
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Temporal, Spatial, and Temperature Controls on Organic Carbon Mineralization and Methanogenesis in Arctic High-Centered Polygon Soils.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303683
Source
Front Microbiol. 2020; 11:616518
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2020
Author
Taniya Roy Chowdhury
Erin C Berns
Ji-Won Moon
Baohua Gu
Liyuan Liang
Stan D Wullschleger
David E Graham
Author Affiliation
Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge, TN, United States.
Source
Front Microbiol. 2020; 11:616518
Date
2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Warming temperatures in continuous permafrost zones of the Arctic will alter both hydrological and geochemical soil conditions, which are strongly linked with heterotrophic microbial carbon (C) cycling. Heterogeneous permafrost landscapes are often dominated by polygonal features formed by expanding ice wedges: water accumulates in low centered polygons (LCPs), and water drains outward to surrounding troughs in high centered polygons (HCPs). These geospatial differences in hydrology cause gradients in biogeochemistry, soil C storage potential, and thermal properties. Presently, data quantifying carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) release from HCP soils are needed to support modeling and evaluation of warming-induced CO2 and CH4 fluxes from tundra soils. This study quantifies the distribution of microbial CO2 and CH4 release in HCPs over a range of temperatures and draws comparisons to previous LCP studies. Arctic tundra soils were initially characterized for geochemical and hydraulic properties. Laboratory incubations at -2, +4, and +8°C were used to quantify temporal trends in CO2 and CH4 production from homogenized active layer organic and mineral soils in HCP centers and troughs, and methanogen abundance was estimated from mcrA gene measurements. Results showed that soil water availability, organic C, and redox conditions influence temporal dynamics and magnitude of gas production from HCP active layer soils during warming. At early incubation times (2-9 days), higher CO2 emissions were observed from HCP trough soils than from HCP center soils, but increased CO2 production occurred in center soils at later times (>20 days). HCP center soils did not support methanogenesis, but CH4-producing trough soils did indicate methanogen presence. Consistent with previous LCP studies, HCP organic soils showed increased CO2 and CH4 production with elevated water content, but HCP trough mineral soils produced more CH4 than LCP mineral soils. HCP mineral soils also released substantial CO2 but did not show a strong trend in CO2 and CH4 release with water content. Knowledge of temporal and spatial variability in microbial C mineralization rates of Arctic soils in response to warming are key to constraining uncertainties in predictive climate models.
PubMed ID
33505383 View in PubMed
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Warming increases methylmercury production in an Arctic soil.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272450
Source
Environ Pollut. 2016 Apr 28;214:504-509
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-28-2016
Author
Ziming Yang
Wei Fang
Xia Lu
Guo-Ping Sheng
David E Graham
Liyuan Liang
Stan D Wullschleger
Baohua Gu
Source
Environ Pollut. 2016 Apr 28;214:504-509
Date
Apr-28-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Rapid temperature rise in Arctic permafrost impacts not only the degradation of stored soil organic carbon (SOC) and climate feedback, but also the production and bioaccumulation of methylmercury (MeHg) toxin that can endanger humans, as well as wildlife in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Currently little is known concerning the effects of rapid permafrost thaw on microbial methylation and how SOC degradation is coupled to MeHg biosynthesis. Here we describe the effects of warming on MeHg production in an Arctic soil during an 8-month anoxic incubation experiment. Net MeHg production increased >10 fold in both organic- and mineral-rich soil layers at warmer (8 °C) than colder (-2 °C) temperatures. The type and availability of labile SOC, such as reducing sugars and ethanol, were particularly important in fueling the rapid initial biosynthesis of MeHg. Freshly amended mercury was more readily methylated than preexisting mercury in the soil. Additionally, positive correlations between mercury methylation and methane and ferrous ion production indicate linkages between SOC degradation and MeHg production. These results show that climate warming and permafrost thaw could potentially enhance MeHg production by an order of magnitude, impacting Arctic terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems by increased exposure to mercury through bioaccumulation and biomagnification in the food web.
PubMed ID
27131808 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.