Skip header and navigation

Refine By

66 records – page 1 of 7.

Association between neighborhood active living potential and walking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159113
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2008 Apr 15;167(8):944-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2008
Author
Lise Gauvin
Mylène Riva
Tracie Barnett
Lucie Richard
Cora Lynn Craig
Michaël Spivock
Sophie Laforest
Suzanne Laberge
Marie-Chantal Fournel
Hélène Gagnon
Suzie Gagné
Author Affiliation
Groupe de Recherche Interdisciplinaire en Santé, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. lise.gauvin.2@umontreal.ca
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2008 Apr 15;167(8):944-53
Date
Apr-15-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Confidence Intervals
Exercise
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Motor Activity
Odds Ratio
Physical Fitness
Quebec
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Telephone
Walking
Abstract
This paper examines the association between neighborhood active living potential and walking among middle-aged and older adults. A sample of 2,614 (61.1% women) persons aged 45 years or older and living in one of 112 census tracts in Montreal, Canada, were recruited between February and May of 2005 to participate in a 20-minute telephone survey. Data were linked to observational data on neighborhood active living potential in the 112 census tracts and analyzed through multilevel modeling. Greater density of destinations in the census tract was associated with greater likelihoods of walking for any reason at least 5 days per week for at least 30 minutes (odds ratio = 1.53, 95% confidence interval: 1.21, 1.94). Associations were attenuated but remained statistically significant after controlling for socioeconomic, health, lifestyle, and other physical activity characteristics. Sensitivity analyses showed that associations were robust across smaller and larger volumes of walking. No associations were found between dimensions of neighborhood active living potential and walking for recreational reasons. The authors conclude that a larger number and variety of neighborhood destinations in one's residential environment are associated with more walking and possibly more utilitarian walking among middle-aged or older adults.
PubMed ID
18227097 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of individual network social capital with abdominal adiposity, overweight and obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153076
Source
J Public Health (Oxf). 2009 Mar;31(1):175-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Spencer Moore
Mark Daniel
Catherine Paquet
Laurette Dubé
Lise Gauvin
Author Affiliation
School of Kinesiology and Health Studies, Queen's University, 69 Union Street, PEC 215, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. mooresp@queensu.ca
Source
J Public Health (Oxf). 2009 Mar;31(1):175-83
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - physiology
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Overweight - epidemiology
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Social Class
Social Support
Waist Circumference
Young Adult
Abstract
Limited research has examined the association of individual trust, participation and social capital with obesity using objective measures of waist circumference (WC), body mass index (BMI) and network measures of social capital.
Data were obtained from a representative sample of Montreal residents. Participants completed questionnaires that included a position generator for collecting network social capital data. Measures of WC, height and weight were collected by registered nurses. To estimate associations with cardiometabolic risk, data on WC for individuals with BMI between 18.5 and 34.9 were extracted for analysis (n = 291). Using a proportional odds model with clustered robust standard errors, we evaluated the association of three different measures of individual social capital with elevated and substantially elevated WC and overweight and obesity categories of BMI. These measures were then evaluated in their associations with elevated WC and BMI, adjusting for socio-demographic and behavioral covariates.
Network social capital was inversely associated with the likelihood of being in an elevated WC risk category (odds ratio (OR) = 0.81, 95% confidence intervals (CI: 0.69, 0.96) and higher BMI category (OR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.71, 0.92).
Higher individual network social capital is associated with a lower likelihood of elevated WC risk and overweight and obesity.
PubMed ID
19153095 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between area-level unemployment, body mass index, and risk factors for cardiovascular disease in an urban area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146291
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2009 Dec;6(12):3082-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Ashley Isaac Naimi
Catherine Paquet
Lise Gauvin
Mark Daniel
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. ashley.naimi@unc.edu
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2009 Dec;6(12):3082-96
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood glucose
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Confidence Intervals
Female
Geographic Information Systems
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Style
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological
Unemployment - statistics & numerical data
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) has been linked to "neighbourhood" socioeconomic status (nSES), often operationalized as a composite index of aggregate income, occupation and education within predefined administrative boundaries. The role of specific, non-composite socioeconomic markers has not been clearly explained. It is also unclear whether the relationship between nSES and CVD varies according to sex. We sought to determine whether area-level unemployment (ALU) was associated with CVD risk, and whether this association differed by sex.
342 individuals from the Montreal Neighbourhood Survey of Lifestyle and Health provided self-reported behavioural and socioeconomic information. A nurse collected biochemical and anthropometric data. ALU, a weighted average of the proportion of persons 15-years and older available for but without work, was measured using a Geographic Information System for a 250 m buffer centred on individual residence. Generalized Estimating Equations were used to estimate the associations between ALU, body mass index (BMI) and a cumulative score for total cardiometabolic risk (TCR).
After confounder adjustments, the mean 4(th) minus 1(st) quartile difference in BMI was 3.19 kg/m(2) (95% CI: 2.39, 3.99), while the prevalence ratio for the 4(th) relative to 1(st) quartile for TCR was 2.20 (95 % CI: 1.53, 3.17). Sex interacted with ALU; women relative to men had greater mean 3.97 kg/m(2) (95% CI: 2.08, 5.85) BMI and greater mean TCR 1.51 (95% CI: 0.78, 2.90), contrasted at mean ALU.
Area-level unemployment is associated with greater CVD risk, and this association is stronger for women.
Notes
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2006 Jul;63(2):485-50016476514
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2001 Apr;29(2):371-8311446289
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2007 Mar;97(3):500-817267734
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2007 Jun;61(6):491-817496257
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2007;7:25517888149
Cites: Health Place. 2008 Jun;14(2):117-3217590377
Cites: Am Heart J. 2008 Apr;155(4):699-70518371479
Cites: J Public Health (Oxf). 2009 Mar;31(1):175-8319153095
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2001 Jul 12;345(2):99-10611450679
Cites: Health Place. 2009 Dec;15(4):1071-719482506
Cites: Circulation. 2002 Jul 16;106(3):388-9112119259
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2002 Nov;92(11):1761-712406805
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2003 Feb;56(4):769-8412560010
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2003 Feb 15;157(4):364-7512578807
Cites: Health Rep. 2002;13(3):23-3112743958
Cites: Health Place. 2003 Sep;9(3):263-7112810333
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2003 Nov;57(10):1847-6114499510
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1990 Dec;52(6):1125-332239790
Cites: Epidemiology. 1993 Sep;4(5):455-638399695
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 1996 Mar;37(1):1-268820308
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 1997;18:341-789143723
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1997 Jul 1;146(1):48-639215223
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1997 Oct;50(10):1123-89368520
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1998 Jan 1;338(1):1-79414324
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1998 Jan;46(1):97-1179464672
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1998 Oct;47(8):1113-209723856
Cites: Milbank Q. 1998;76(3):403-48, 3059738169
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1998 Jun;52(6):399-4059764262
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1999 Jan;53(1):55-6310326055
Cites: Am J Public Health Nations Health. 1951 Mar;41(3):279-8114819398
Cites: J Public Health Policy. 2004;25(3-4):391-40715683074
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2005 Jul 15;162(2):171-8215972939
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2005 Dec;61(12):2469-8115972242
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Jan;83(1):139-4516400062
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2006 Apr;62(8):2061-7116203075
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(3):228-3716754580
PubMed ID
20049247 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between children's diets and features of their residential and school neighbourhood food environments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128375
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012;103(9 Suppl 3):eS48-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Andraea Van Hulst
Tracie A Barnett
Lise Gauvin
Mark Daniel
Yan Kestens
Madeleine Bird
Katherine Gray-Donald
Marie Lambert
Author Affiliation
École de santé publique, Université de Montréal; Centre de recherche du CHU Sainte-Justine. a.van.hulst@umontreal.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012;103(9 Suppl 3):eS48-54
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Environment Design - statistics & numerical data
Fast Foods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Food Services - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Quebec
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Schools
Abstract
Among studies of the built environment, few examine neighbourhood food environments in relation to children's diets. We examined the associations of residential and school neighbourhood access to different types of food establishments with children's diets.
Data from QUALITY (Quebec Adipose and Lifestyle Investigation in Youth), an ongoing study on the natural history of obesity in 630 Quebec youth aged 8-10 years with a parental history of obesity, were analyzed (n=512). Three 24-hour diet recalls were used to assess dietary intake of vegetables and fruit, and sugar-sweetened beverages. Questionnaires were used to determine the frequency of eating/snacking out and consumption of delivered/take-out foods. We characterized residential and school neighbourhood food environments by means of a Geographic Information System. Variables included distance to the nearest supermarket, fast-food restaurant and convenience store, and densities of each food establishment type computed for 1 km network buffers around each child's residence and school. Retail Food Environment indices were also computed. Multivariable logistic regressions (residential access) and generalized estimating equations (school access) were used for analysis.
Residential and school neighbourhood access to supermarkets was not associated with children's diets. Residing in neighbourhoods with lower access to fast-food restaurants and convenience stores was associated with a lower likelihood of eating and snacking out. Children attending schools in neighbourhoods with a higher number of unhealthful relative to healthful food establishments scored most poorly on dietary outcomes.
Further investigations are needed to inform policies aimed at shaping neighbourhood-level food purchasing opportunities, particularly for access to fast-food restaurants and convenience stores.
PubMed ID
23618089 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between residential food environment and dietary patterns in urban-dwelling older adults: results from the VoisiNuAge study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122667
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Nov;15(11):2026-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Geneviève Mercille
Lucie Richard
Lise Gauvin
Yan Kestens
Bryna Shatenstein
Mark Daniel
Hélène Payette
Author Affiliation
Institut de recherche en santé publique de l'Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada. genevieve.mercille.1@umontreal.ca
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Nov;15(11):2026-39
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Commerce
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - standards
Environment
Fast Foods
Female
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Questionnaires
Restaurants
Urban Population
Abstract
To examine associations between the availability of residential-area food sources and dietary patterns among seniors.
Cross-sectional analyses. Individual-level data from the NuAge study on nutrition and healthy ageing were merged with geographic information system data on food store availability and area-level social composition. Two dietary patterns reflecting lower- and higher-quality diets (respectively designated 'western' and 'prudent') were identified from FFQ data. Two food source relative availability measures were calculated for a 500 m road-network buffer around participants' homes: (i) proportion of fast-food outlets (%FFO) relative to all restaurants and (ii) proportion of stores potentially selling healthful foods (%HFS, healthful food stores) relative to all food stores. Associations between dietary patterns and food source exposure were tested in linear regression models accounting for individual (health and sociodemographic) and area-level (socio-economic and ethnicity) covariates.
Montréal metropolitan area, Canada.
Urban-dwelling older adults (n 751), aged 68 to 84 years.
%FFO was inversely associated with prudent diet (ß = -0·105; P
PubMed ID
22789436 View in PubMed
Less detail

Casting weight goal as a function of weight status among a representative population-based sample of adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150029
Source
Body Image. 2009 Sep;6(4):277-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Mathieu Roy
Lise Gauvin
Author Affiliation
Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Université de Montréal, Québec, Canada. mathieu.roy.3@umontreal.ca
Source
Body Image. 2009 Sep;6(4):277-84
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Age Factors
Body Image
Body Weight
Female
Goals
Humans
Personal Satisfaction
Quebec
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Weight Gain
Weight Loss
Abstract
This paper pursues two objectives: (1) to estimate proportions of adolescents with a weight goal that matched and mismatched weight status, and (2) to identify correlates of a mismatched weight goal. Data were from a representative population-based sample of adolescents (n=2346, 51% female; 91.5% complete data). Results showed that 69% of adolescents had a weight goal that matched weight status whereas 31% had a weight goal that mismatched weight status. Body dissatisfaction was a significant predictor of having a mismatched weight goal for both sexes while elevated psychological distress was a predictor among girls. Being body dissatisfied mediated the association between psychological distress and having a mismatched weight goal among girls. Casting weight goal as a function of weight status may allow for a better understanding of overall weight management strategies.
PubMed ID
19560411 View in PubMed
Less detail

Child asthma and change in elevated depressive symptoms among mothers of children of a birth cohort from Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132634
Source
Women Health. 2011 Jul 22;51(5):461-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-22-2011
Author
Mai Thanh Tu
Geneviève Perreault
Louise Séguin
Lise Gauvin
Author Affiliation
Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Université de Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Women Health. 2011 Jul 22;51(5):461-81
Date
Jul-22-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asthma - psychology
Child
Cohort Studies
Depression - etiology
Depression, Postpartum - etiology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Odds Ratio
Poverty
Pregnancy
Quebec
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
The authors examined the association between maternal reports of child asthma attacks since birth and occurrence of elevated maternal depressive symptoms at seventeen months postpartum in the present study. The modifying role of poverty in this association was also examined. Data from n = 1,696 mother-child dyads from the Quebec Longitudinal Study of Child Development, a birth cohort of children born in 1998, were used. Maternal depressive symptoms were measured with an abridged and validated twelve-item version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Maternal reports of child asthma attacks since birth in relation to the occurrence of maternal depressive symptoms at 17 months postpartum and the potential modifying role of poverty were tested using multiple logistic regression models. When mothers reported child asthma attacks, those without elevated depressive symptoms at 5 months postpartum had lower odds of elevated depressive symptoms one year later (OR = 0.2, 95% CI: 0.1-0.7). Poverty was associated with increased odds of elevated maternal depressive symptoms (OR = 2.4, 95% CI: 1.5-3.9), without interacting with child asthma. Through this study, the authors suggest that in mothers without elevated symptoms at 5 months, reported child asthma attacks since birth did not contribute one year later to new occurrence of depressive symptoms.
PubMed ID
21797679 View in PubMed
Less detail

Community unemployment and immigrants' health in Montreal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170732
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2006 Jul;63(2):485-500
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Maria-Victoria Zunzunegui
Mathieu Forster
Lise Gauvin
Marie-France Raynault
J. Douglas Willms
Author Affiliation
Université de Montréal, Que., Canada. maria.victoria.zunzunegui@umontreal.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2006 Jul;63(2):485-500
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Behavior
Health status
Humans
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Quebec
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Unemployment - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This research examines the relationship between community unemployment and the physical and mental health of immigrants in comparison to non-immigrants in Montreal under the hypothesis that high unemployment in the community may generate more negative effects on the health of immigrants than on non-immigrants. Possible gender differences in these associations are also examined. Montreal residents were studied via multilevel analysis, using both individual survey data and neighbourhood data from 49 police districts. Individual-level data were excerpted from a 1998 health survey of Montreal residents, while neighbourhood data originated from survey data collected in the 49 Montreal police districts and the 1996 Canadian Census. The associations between community unemployment and self-rated health, psychological distress and obesity are examined, and hypotheses regarding the modifying mechanisms via which male and female immigrants may run a greater risk of poor health than non-immigrants when living in areas of high unemployment were tested. Between neighbourhoods, variations in the three health outcomes were slight, and differences in health were not associated with differences in community unemployment. The associations between community unemployment and health varied according to immigration status. At the individual level, immigrants do not differ from non-immigrants with respect to the three health indicators, except that second-generation males are slightly heavier. However, when living in areas of high unemployment, immigrants tend to report poor physical and mental health in comparison to non-immigrants. Among first-generation immigrants, community unemployment was associated with psychological distress. Among second-generation immigrants, the probability of obesity and poor self-rated health increased significantly for those living in areas with high unemployment, but these associations reached statistical significance only for men. Findings among first-generation immigrants are interpreted with respect to the effects of possible discrimination in areas with low job availability. Among second-generation men, poor physical health and obesity may be the result of poor health habits stemming from perceived lack of life opportunities.
PubMed ID
16476514 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of three lifecourse models of poverty in predicting cardiovascular disease risk in youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112451
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2013 Aug;23(8):485-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Lisa Kakinami
Louise Séguin
Marie Lambert
Lise Gauvin
Béatrice Nikiema
Gilles Paradis
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada. lisa.kakinami@mcgill.ca
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2013 Aug;23(8):485-91
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Forecasting
Humans
Infant
Longitudinal Studies
Models, Theoretical
Poverty
Quebec
Risk assessment
Abstract
Childhood poverty heightens the risk of adulthood cardiovascular disease (CVD), but the underlying pathways are poorly understood. Three lifecourse models have been proposed but have never been tested among youth. We assessed the longitudinal association of childhood poverty with CVD risk factors in 10-year-old youth according to the timing, accumulation, and mobility models.
The Québec Longitudinal Study of Child Development birth cohort was established in 1998 (n = 2120). Poverty was defined as annual income below the low-income thresholds defined by Statistics Canada. Multiple imputation was used for missing data. Multivariable linear regression models adjusted for gender, pubertal stage, parental education, maternal age, whether the household was a single parent household, whether the child was overweight or obese, the child's physical activity in the past week, and family history.
Approximately 40% experienced poverty at least once, 16% throughout childhood, and 25% intermittently. Poverty was associated with significantly elevated triglycerides and insulin according to the timing and accumulation models, although the timing model was superior for predicting insulin and the accumulation model was superior for predicting triglycerides.
Early and prolonged exposure to poverty significantly increases CVD risk among 10-year-old youth.
PubMed ID
23830840 View in PubMed
Less detail

Conceptualizing and operationalizing neighbourhoods: the conundrum of identifying territorial units.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160081
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Jul-Aug;98 Suppl 1:S18-26
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lise Gauvin
Eric Robitaille
Mylène Riva
Lindsay McLaren
Clément Dassa
Louise Potvin
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Université de Montréal, Quebec, Canada. lise.gauvin.2@umontreal.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Jul-Aug;98 Suppl 1:S18-26
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Geography
Health Behavior
Health status
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Politics
Public Health
Quebec
Residence Characteristics
Social Class
Social Environment
Social Justice
Urban health
Urban Population
Abstract
Over the past 10 years, there has been a surge of interest in studying small-area characteristics as determinants of population and individual health. Accumulating evidence indicates the existence of variations in the health status of populations living in areas that differ in affluence and shows that selected small-area characteristics are associated with the occurrence of selected health behaviours. These variations cannot be attributed solely to differential characteristics of populations living within small areas. One vexing problem that confronts researchers is that of conceptualizing and operationalizing neighbourhoods through delineation of small territorial units in health research.
The aims of this paper are to selectively overview conceptual definitions of neighbourhoods and to illustrate the challenges of operationalizing neighbourhoods in urban areas by describing our attempts to map out small territorial units on the Island of Montreal and in the City of Calgary.
We outline guiding principles for the construction of a methodology for establishing small-area contours in urban areas and formulate recommendations for future research.
PubMed ID
18047157 View in PubMed
Less detail

66 records – page 1 of 7.