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Attitudes to sharing personal health information in living kidney donation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144792
Source
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2010 Apr;5(4):717-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Patricia Hizo-Abes
Ann Young
Peter P Reese
Phil McFarlane
Linda Wright
Meaghan Cuerden
Amit X Garg
Author Affiliation
London Kidney Clinical Research Unit, Room ELL-101, Westminster, London Health Sciences Centre, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 4G5, Canada.
Source
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2010 Apr;5(4):717-22
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information - legislation & jurisprudence
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Confidentiality - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Policy
Health Records, Personal
Humans
Informed Consent - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Kidney Transplantation - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Living Donors - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Patient Education as Topic
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Questionnaires
Abstract
In living kidney donation, transplant professionals consider the rights of a living kidney donor and recipient to keep their personal health information confidential and the need to disclose this information to the other for informed consent. In incompatible kidney exchange, personal health information from multiple living donors and recipients may affect decision making and outcomes.
We conducted a survey to understand and compare the preferences of potential donors (n = 43), potential recipients (n = 73), and health professionals (n = 41) toward sharing personal health information (in total 157 individuals).
When considering traditional live-donor transplantation, donors and recipients generally agreed that a recipient's health information should be shared with the donor (86 and 80%, respectively) and that a donor's information should be shared with the recipient (97 and 89%, respectively). When considering incompatible kidney exchange, donors and recipients generally agreed that a recipient's information should be shared with all donors and recipients involved in the transplant (85 and 85%, respectively) and that a donor's information should also be shared with all involved (95 and 90%, respectively). These results were contrary to attitudes expressed by transplant professionals, who frequently disagreed about whether such information should be shared.
Future policies and practice could facilitate greater sharing of personal health information in living kidney donation. This requires a consideration of which information is relevant, how to put it in context, and a plan to obtain consent from all concerned.
Notes
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Cites: Am J Transplant. 2009 Jul;9(7):1558-7319459792
Cites: Transplantation. 2004 Aug 27;78(4):491-215446304
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Cites: Transplantation. 2005 Mar 27;79(6 Suppl):S53-6615785361
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Cites: J Pers Assess. 2006 Dec;87(3):305-1617134338
Cites: Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2006 Nov;1(6):1148-5317699340
Cites: Am J Transplant. 2008 Sep;8(9):1878-9018671676
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2008 Oct;23(10):3316-2418599559
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 Mar 12;360(11):1096-10119279341
Cites: J Med Ethics. 2009 Apr;35(4):270-119332587
Cites: Kidney Int. 2009 May;75(10):1088-9819225540
Cites: Am J Transplant. 2004 Oct;4(10):1553-415367208
PubMed ID
20299371 View in PubMed
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Electronic psychosocial evaluation tool: use in a living donor organ transplant program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184669
Source
Prog Transplant. 2003 Jun;13(2):97-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Maureen Iona O'Dell
Linda Wright
Author Affiliation
Toronto General Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Prog Transplant. 2003 Jun;13(2):97-104
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Confidentiality
Data Collection - methods
Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted - methods
Forms and Records Control
Humans
Interview, Psychological - methods
Living Donors - psychology
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Ontario
Patient Selection
Social Work - methods
Time Factors
Tissue and Organ Procurement
User-Computer Interface
Abstract
Psychosocial evaluation of potential organ donors ensures that these patients are prepared for donation and that their psychosocial issues have been addressed. The determination that the decision to donate an organ has been made voluntarily by a competent individual is a primary concern for living donor transplant programs, which must work to the highest ethical standard in this unique area of medicine. Identification of potential vulnerabilities on the part of the donor permits monitoring and/or intercession both before and after donation. Ensuring the confidentiality of patient information is important and represents a cornerstone of social work practice. At our institution, social workers have developed an electronic recording tool for use in evaluating organ donors; this tool is designed to maximize quality and ease of information gathering, ensure standardization of practice across programs, simplify record keeping, and enhance communication while minimizing time investment and ensuring patient confidentiality.
PubMed ID
12841515 View in PubMed
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Ethics and SARS: lessons from Toronto.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182543
Source
BMJ. 2003 Dec 6;327(7427):1342-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-6-2003
Author
Peter A Singer
Solomon R Benatar
Mark Bernstein
Abdallah S Daar
Bernard M Dickens
Susan K MacRae
Ross E G Upshur
Linda Wright
Randi Zlotnik Shaul
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics, 88 College St, Toronto, Canada M5G 1L4. peter.singer@utoronto.ca
Source
BMJ. 2003 Dec 6;327(7427):1342-4
Date
Dec-6-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communicable Disease Control - methods
Confidentiality
Decision Making
Ethics, Medical
Humans
Ontario - epidemiology
Professional Practice - ethics
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome - epidemiology
World Health
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 2001 Dec 5;286(21):2711-711730447
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2002 Mar-Apr;93(2):101-311968179
Cites: Crit Care. 2003 Aug;7(4):269-7112930546
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Jun 4;289(21):2801-912734147
Cites: CMAJ. 2003 May 13;168(10):1245-5112743065
PubMed ID
14656848 View in PubMed
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The ethics statement of the Vancouver Forum on the live lung, liver, pancreas, and intestine donor.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169112
Source
Transplantation. 2006 May 27;81(10):1386-7
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
May-27-2006

Sharing organs with foreign nationals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135365
Source
Prog Transplant. 2011 Mar;21(1):78-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Rebecca Bruni
Linda Wright
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. rebecca.bruni@utoronto.ca
Source
Prog Transplant. 2011 Mar;21(1):78-82
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Emigration and Immigration
Health Care Rationing
Humans
International Cooperation
Internationality
Organ Transplantation
Patient Selection
Public Policy
Tissue and Organ Procurement
Abstract
Organs for transplantation are an absolute scarcity throughout the world, and many countries do not offer transplantation. Developed countries with transplant programs receive requests to list foreign nationals for transplantation. Any national standard deserves justification by a thorough exploration of the issues. In this article, the issues regarding organ transplantation for foreign nationals in Canada are explored. Currently Canada has no policy on listing foreign nationals for transplantation. Three topics are reviewed: (1) arguments for and against the transplantation of organs from deceased donors to foreign nationals, (2) relevant legislation and position statements, and (3) relevant practices in other countries. Finally, practical policy options are suggested. This article's analysis of the issues will provide guidance for health care professionals and policy makers in Canada and developed countries exploring listing foreign nationals for transplantation.
PubMed ID
21485947 View in PubMed
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