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A framework of operating models for interdisciplinary research programs in clinical service organizations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158303
Source
Eval Program Plann. 2008 May;31(2):160-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Gillian King
Melissa Currie
Linda Smith
Michelle Servais
Janette McDougall
Author Affiliation
Thames Valley Children's Centre, 779 Baseline Road East, London, Ont., Canada. gking27@uwo.ca
Source
Eval Program Plann. 2008 May;31(2):160-73
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Cooperative Behavior
Disabled Children
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Models, organizational
Ontario
Program Evaluation - methods
Research Design
Abstract
A framework of operating models for interdisciplinary research programs in clinical service organizations is presented, consisting of a "clinician-researcher" skill development model, a program evaluation model, a researcher-led knowledge generation model, and a knowledge conduit model. Together, these models comprise a tailored, collaborative approach to enhancing research-informed practice in community-based clinical service organizations. The models place different degrees of emphasis on the development of research-related skills in practitioners, the generation of knowledge tailored to clinical practice, and knowledge sharing. The nature, philosophical basis, roles of research staff members, outputs and impacts, and strengths and limitations of each model are described, in the context of a long-standing, interdisciplinary research program in a children's rehabilitation service organization. The use of the model framework as a tool for the design of interdisciplinary, community-based research programs is discussed.
PubMed ID
18336906 View in PubMed
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Guidelines for the management of head injuries in remote and rural Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175184
Source
Alaska Med. 2004 Jul-Sep;46(3):58-62
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Author
Frank Sacco
Ken Zafren
Ken Brown
Tim Cohen
B J Coopes
John Godersky
Don Hudson
Steve Hyams
David Ingraham
Mike Levy
William Ma
Patricia Martinez
William Montano
John Mithun
James O'Malley
Karen O'Neill
David Powers
Linda Smith
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Alaska Native Medical Center, 4315 Diplomacy Drive, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA. fsacco@anmc. org
Source
Alaska Med. 2004 Jul-Sep;46(3):58-62
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Craniocerebral Trauma - diagnosis - therapy
Glasgow Coma Scale
Humans
Medically underserved area
Risk factors
Rural Health Services - standards
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Unconsciousness
Abstract
Numerous recommendations on the initial evaluation and treatment of the head injured patient have been proposed over the last several years. Most assume there is readily available access to computed tomography and neurosurgical specialists. Many clinicians in Alaska must evaluate and begin treatment of head injured patients in circumstances quite different from this. Vast distances, severe weather and limited medical evacuation capability are factors that come into play while caring for these patients. The current medicolegal climate also contributes to clinician anxiety over missing rare but potentially serious injuries. These guidelines developed by Alaska clinicians from multiple specialties are meant to assist clinicians dealing with this very common problem and represent a reasonable approach to these patients in remote and rural Alaska.
PubMed ID
15839596 View in PubMed
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