Skip header and navigation

Refine By

36 records – page 1 of 4.

Canadian-trained nurses in North Carolina.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179375
Source
Healthc Q. 2004;7(3):suppl 2-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
George H Pink
Linda McGillis Hall
Peggy Leatt
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy and Administration, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1101 McGavran-Greenberg Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. gpink@email.unc.edu
Source
Healthc Q. 2004;7(3):suppl 2-11
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Educational Status
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Foreign Professional Personnel
Humans
Licensure
Male
Middle Aged
North Carolina
Nurses - supply & distribution
Abstract
Little is known about nurses who leave Canada to work in the US. The main purpose of this study is to gain some insight into the emigration component of nursing supply and demand by comparing characteristics of nurses who left Canada to nurses who stayed. Specifically, Canadian-trained RNs who work in the state of North Carolina are compared to RNs who work in Canada. Results show that there are 40% more Canadian-trained RNs in North Carolina than there are in Prince Edward Island. A higher percentage of Canadian-trained RNs in North Carolina are male, under 40 years of age, have baccalaureate training and graduated less than 10 years ago. Canadian-trained nurses in both countries have very low rates of unemployment. The loss of Canadian-trained RNs to the US is a significant problem, and there is an urgent need to obtain a better understanding of why nurses leave the country.
Notes
Comment In: Healthc Q. 2005;8(3):8-916078391
PubMed ID
15230179 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in patient health outcomes from admission to discharge in acute care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122363
Source
J Nurs Care Qual. 2013 Jan-Mar;28(1):8-16
Publication Type
Article
Author
Linda McGillis Hall
Walter P Wodchis
Xiaomu Ma
Stacey Johnson
Author Affiliation
Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. l.mcgillishall@utoronto.ca
Source
J Nurs Care Qual. 2013 Jan-Mar;28(1):8-16
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Dyspnea - nursing
Fatigue - nursing
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nausea - nursing
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - standards
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Patient Admission
Patient Discharge
Pressure Ulcer - nursing
Quality Indicators, Health Care - organization & administration
Retrospective Studies
Urinary Incontinence - nursing
Young Adult
Abstract
Clinical databases comprising data that are available at a national level provide the opportunity to explore the relationships between nursing interventions and patient health outcomes. This research examined baseline and changes in patient health outcomes between admission and discharge using data from 59 157 acute-care hospital-based patient records at 44 hospitals in Canada. Statistically significant improvements in all of the health outcomes were noted, with the exception of pressure ulcers. The standardized indicators offer a mechanism for evaluating the effectiveness and quality of nursing care interventions.
PubMed ID
22824911 View in PubMed
Less detail

Choosing nursing as a career: a narrative analysis of Millennial nurses' career choice of virtue.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102772
Source
Nurs Inq. 2013 Dec;20(4):305-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Sheri Lynn Price
Linda McGillis Hall
Jan E Angus
Elizabeth Peter
Source
Nurs Inq. 2013 Dec;20(4):305-16
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Career Choice
Career Mobility
Education, Nursing
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Job Satisfaction
Motivation
Nursing
Personnel Selection
Abstract
The growth and sustainability of the nursing profession depends on the ability to recruit and retain the upcoming generation of professionals. Understanding the career choice experiences and professional expectations of Millennial nurses (born 1980 or after) is a critical component of recruitment and retention strategies. This study utilized Polkinghorne's interpretive, narrative approach to understand how Millennial nurses explain, account for and make sense of their choice of nursing as a career. The positioning of nursing as a virtuous choice was both temporally and contextually influenced. The decision to enter the profession was initially emplotted around a traditional understanding of nursing as a virtuous profession: altruistic, noble, caring and compassionate. The centricity of virtues depicts one-dimensional understanding of the nursing profession that alone could prove dissatisfying to a generation of professionals who have many career choices available to them. The narratives reveal how participants' perceptions and expectations remain influenced by a stereotypical understanding of nursing, an image that remains prevalent in society and which holds implications for the future recruitment, socialization and retention strategies for upcoming and future generations of nurses.
PubMed ID
23551958 View in PubMed
Less detail

Decision making for nurse staffing: Canadian perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165517
Source
Policy Polit Nurs Pract. 2006 Nov;7(4):261-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Linda McGillis Hall
Leah Pink
Michelle Lalonde
Gail Tomblin Murphy
Linda O'Brien-Pallas
Heather K Spence Laschinger
Ann Tourangeau
Jeanne Besner
Debbie White
Deborah Tregunno
Donna Thomson
Jessica Peterson
Lisa Seto
Jennifer Akeroyd
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing & new investigator, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, University of Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Policy Polit Nurs Pract. 2006 Nov;7(4):261-9
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Data Collection - methods
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Decision Making, Organizational
Evidence-Based Medicine
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Leadership
Models, Nursing
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nurse Administrators - organization & administration - psychology
Nurse's Role
Nursing Administration Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - supply & distribution
Nursing, Supervisory - organization & administration
Organizational Policy
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - organization & administration
Pilot Projects
Quality of Health Care
Research Design
Workload
Abstract
The effectiveness of methods for determining nurse staffing is unknown. Despite a great deal of interest in Canada, efforts conducted to date indicate that there is a lack of consensus on nurse staffing decision-making processes. This study explored nurse staffing decision-making processes, supports in place for nurses, nursing workload being experienced, and perceptions of nursing care and outcomes in Canada. Substantial information was provided from participants about the nurse staffing decision-making methods currently employed in Canada including frameworks for nurse staffing, nurse-to-patient ratios, workload measurement systems, and "gut" instinct. A number of key themes emerged from the study that can form the basis for policy and practice changes related to determining appropriate workload for nursing in Canada. These include the use of (a) staffing principles and frameworks, (b) nursing workload measurement systems, (c) nurse-to-patient ratios, and (d) the need for uptake of evidence related to nurse staffing.
Notes
Erratum In: Policy Polit Nurs Pract. 2007 Feb;8(1):71
PubMed ID
17242391 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of director of care support on job stress and job satisfaction among long-term care nurse supervisors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160430
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2007;20(3):52-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Katherine S McGilton
Linda McGillis Hall
Veronique Boscart
Maryanne Brown
Author Affiliation
Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, ON. mcgilton.kathy@torontorehab.on.ca
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2007;20(3):52-66
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel
Burnout, Professional - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Job Satisfaction
Leadership
Long-Term Care - organization & administration - psychology
Male
Models, Psychological
Nurse Administrators - organization & administration - psychology
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Homes - organization & administration
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing, Supervisory - organization & administration
Occupational Health
Ontario
Organizational Culture
Risk factors
Social Support
Workplace - organization & administration - psychology
Abstract
The provision of care for frail older adults in Long-term care settings is challenging. It requires not only specialized knowledge and skills, but also supportive commitment on the part of directors of care to their nurse supervisors (registered nurses and registered practical nurses) and unregulated healthcare staff. In these complex work environments, communication and leadership are critical to staff job satisfaction. Therefore, it is essential that directors of care represent a source of support for their nurse supervisors. The purpose of this multi-site study was to examine the relationships among perceived support from directors of care, and nurse supervisors' job stress and job satisfaction. Forty-five per cent of the total variance in job satisfaction of nurse supervisors was explained by supervisory support, stress and job category (registered nurse vs. registered practical nurse). Greater supervisory support was also associated with reduced job stress. These findings are essential in developing strategies to improve the nurse supervisory role in long-term care settings.
PubMed ID
17987827 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of leadership and span of control on nurses' job satisfaction and patient satisfaction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146196
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2009;22(3):48-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Amy Sanchez McCutcheon
Diane Doran
Martin Evans
Linda McGillis Hall
Dorothy Pringle
Author Affiliation
Vancouver Coastal Health, Vancouver, BC.
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2009;22(3):48-67
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Clinical Nursing Research
Female
Hospitals, Community
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Leadership
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse Administrators
Nurse's Role
Nursing Administration Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital
Patient satisfaction
Questionnaires
Abstract
Hospital restructuring has resulted in nurse managers' having direct responsibility for a greatly expanded number of units and staff. However, very little research has examined the impact of these larger spans of control on nurse and patient outcomes.
This study examined the relationships between leadership style, span of control, nurses' job satisfaction and patient satisfaction, as well as the moderating effect of span of control on the relationship between leadership style and the two outcomes.
The study was conducted at seven teaching and community hospitals with a sample of 51 units, 41 nurse managers, 717 nurses and 680 patients. Data analyses included multiple regression and hierarchical linear modelling.
The study findings provided support for the theoretical relationships among leadership style, span of control, nurse job satisfaction and patient satisfaction. In addition, the results showed that higher spans of control decreased the positive effects of transformational and transactional leadership styles on job satisfaction and patient satisfaction, and increased the negative effects of management by exception and laissez-faire leadership styles on job satisfaction.
Leadership matters, and certain leadership styles, particularly transformational, are better than others. Span of control also matters: the wider the span, the lower the nurses' job satisfaction and patient satisfaction. However, as spans of control increase in size, no leadership style, even transformational, can overcome the negative effects.
PubMed ID
20057266 View in PubMed
Less detail

Enhancing the quality of supportive supervisory behavior in long-term care facilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175228
Source
J Nurs Adm. 2005 Apr;35(4):181-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Linda McGillis Hall
Katherine S McGilton
Janet Krejci
Dorothy Pringle
Erin Johnston
Laura Fairley
Maryanne Brown
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. l.mcgillishall@utoronto.ca
Source
J Nurs Adm. 2005 Apr;35(4):181-7
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Communication
Female
Focus Groups
Helping Behavior
Humans
Leadership
Long-Term Care
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role
Nurses' Aides - psychology
Nursing Homes - organization & administration
Nursing Staff - organization & administration - psychology
Nursing, Practical
Nursing, Supervisory - standards
Ontario
Personnel Management
Reward
Social Support
Trust
Abstract
The practices of managers and registered nurses (RNs) in long-term care facilities are frequently ineffective in assisting the licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and healthcare aides (HCAs) whom they supervise. Little research exists that examines the area of supportive relationships between nursing staff and supervisors in these settings. The purpose of this study was to gather data that could improve management practices in long-term care residential facilities and enhance the quality of the supervisory relationships between supervisors (nurse managers and RNs) and care providers (HCAs and LPNs) in these settings. The study also identified factors that influence the supervisors' ability to establish supportive relationships with care providers. The challenges and barriers to nurse managers and leaders related to enacting supportive behaviors are discussed as well as their implications for long-term care settings.
PubMed ID
15834257 View in PubMed
Less detail

Going blank: factors contributing to interruptions to nurses' work and related outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139348
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2010 Nov;18(8):1040-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Linda McGillis Hall
Mary Ferguson-Paré
Elizabeth Peter
Debbie White
Jeanne Besner
Anne Chisholm
Ella Ferris
Marla Fryers
Martha Macleod
Barb Mildon
Cheryl Pedersen
Aislinn Hemingway
Author Affiliation
Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. l.mcgillishall@utoronto.ca
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2010 Nov;18(8):1040-7
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Efficiency, Organizational
Focus Groups
Health Services Research
Humans
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration
Ontario
Quality of Health Care
Task Performance and Analysis
Time Management - organization & administration
Workload - psychology
Abstract
To examine interruptions to nurses' work, the systems issues related to these and the associated outcomes.
While some research has described the role interruptions play in medication errors, work is needed to examine specific factors in the nursing work environment that cause interruptions and to assess the impact of these on nurses' work and patient outcomes.
The present study utilized a mixed method design that involved work observation to detect nursing interruptions in the workplace followed by focus groups with a subsample of nurses.
A total of 13,025 interruptions were observed. Equal numbers of these took place on medical and surgical units. The predominant source of interruptions was members of the health team, who interrupted more frequently on medical units.
Differences in the type of patient and the care needs between medical and surgical units may be a contributing factor to these findings. As members of the health team were among the leading source of interruptions, an interdisciplinary team-based approach to changing the organization and design of work should be explored.
Nurse leaders should examine ways in which nurses' work can benefit from system improvements to reduce interruptions that lead to patient safety issues such as treatment delays and loss of concentration.
PubMed ID
21073575 View in PubMed
Less detail

Identification of recruitment and retention strategies for rehabilitation professionals in Ontario, Canada: results from expert panels.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153799
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2008;8:249
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Diem Tran
Linda McGillis Hall
Aileen Davis
Michel D Landry
Dawn Burnett
Katherine Berg
Susan Jaglal
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2008;8:249
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consensus
Delphi Technique
Education, Continuing
Expert Testimony
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Ontario
Personnel Selection
Rehabilitation, Vocational - manpower
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Abstract
Demand for rehabilitation services is expected to increase due to factors such as an aging population, workforce pressures, rise in chronic and complex multi-system disorders, advances in technology, and changes in interprofessional health service delivery models. However, health human resource (HHR) strategies for Canadian rehabilitation professionals are lagging behind other professional groups such as physicians and nurses. The objectives of this study were: 1) to identify recruitment and retention strategies of rehabilitation professionals including occupational therapists, physical therapists and speech language pathologists from the literature; and 2) to investigate both the importance and feasibility of the identified strategies using expert panels amongst HHR and education experts.
A review of the literature was conducted to identify recruitment and retention strategies for rehabilitation professionals. Two expert panels, one on Recruitment and Retention and the other on Education were convened to determine the importance and feasibility of the identified strategies. A modified-delphi process was used to gain consensus and to rate the identified strategies along these two dimensions.
A total of 34 strategies were identified by the Recruitment and Retention and Education expert panels as being important and feasible for the development of a HHR plan for recruitment and retention of rehabilitation professionals. Seven were categorized under the Quality of Worklife and Work Environment theme, another seven in Financial Incentives and Marketing, two in Workload and Skill Mix, thirteen in Professional Development and five in Education and Training.
Based on the results from the expert panels, the three major areas of focus for HHR planning in the rehabilitation sector should include strategies addressing Quality of Worklife and Work Environment, Financial Incentives and Marketing and Professional Development.
Notes
Cites: Phys Ther. 1994 Feb;74(2):177-848290622
Cites: Physiother Can. 1993 Fall;45(4):239-4410130907
Cites: Am J Occup Ther. 1995 Mar;49(3):263-57741161
Cites: J Rural Health. 1995 Spring;11(2):122-710184359
Cites: Med Care. 1999 Sep;37(9):964-810493474
Cites: J Healthc Manag. 2005 Jan-Feb;50(1):49-60; discussion 6015729907
Cites: Am J Occup Ther. 2005 Jul-Aug;59(4):467-7416124213
Cites: Rural Remote Health. 2005 Oct-Dec;5(4):47716375575
Cites: Disabil Rehabil. 2006 Mar 15;28(5):315-2216492626
Cites: Can J Occup Ther. 2006 Apr;73(2):98-10816680913
Cites: Caring. 2006 Sep;25(9):16-917022318
Cites: Aust J Rural Health. 2007 Feb;15(1):21-817257295
Cites: Aust J Rural Health. 2007 Feb;15(1):29-3417257296
Cites: Home Health Care Serv Q. 2007;26(1):43-5817387051
Cites: J Health Organ Manag. 2007;21(3):307-1917713190
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2008;8:1918215313
Cites: Can J Occup Ther. 2001 Oct;68(4):217-2711680916
Cites: J Rural Health. 2001 Summer;17(3):278-8511765892
Cites: Acad Emerg Med. 2002 Nov;9(11):1131-912414461
Cites: Aust J Rural Health. 2004 Feb;12(1):28-914723778
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1984 Sep;74(9):979-836380323
Cites: Can J Occup Ther. 1986 Jun;53(3):151-810277425
Cites: Am J Occup Ther. 1988 Sep;42(9):591-53189490
Cites: Can J Occup Ther. 1989 Apr;56(2):73-6, 77-910292771
Cites: Can J Occup Ther. 1992 Apr;59(1):40-5110118070
Cites: Can J Nurs Adm. 1992 May-Jun;5(2):12-61515428
Cites: J Allied Health. 1994 Summer;23(3):155-647995784
PubMed ID
19068134 View in PubMed
Less detail

Impact of hospital nursing care on 30-day mortality for acute medical patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165976
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2007 Jan;57(1):32-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Ann E Tourangeau
Diane M Doran
Linda McGillis Hall
Linda O'Brien Pallas
Dorothy Pringle
Jack V Tu
Lisa A Cranley
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. ann.tourangeau@utoronto.ca
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2007 Jan;57(1):32-44
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Intensive Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Male
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - standards
Ontario
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
This paper reports on structures and processes of hospital care influencing 30-day mortality for acute medical patients.
Wide variation in risk-adjusted 30-day hospital mortality rates for acute medical patients indicates that hospital structures and processes of care affect patient death. Because nurses provide the majority of care to hospitalized patients, we propose that structures and processes of nursing care have an impact on patient death or survival.
A model hypothesizing the impact of nursing-related hospital care structures and processes on 30-day mortality was tested. Patient data from the Ontario, Canada Discharge Abstract Database 2002-2003, nurse data from the Ontario Nurse Survey 2003, and hospital staffing data from the Ontario Hospital Reporting System 2002-2003 files were used to develop indicators for variables hypothesized to impact 30-day mortality. Two multiple regression models were implemented to test the model. First, all variables were forced to enter the model simultaneously. Second, backward regression was implemented.
Using backward regression, 45% of variance in risk-adjusted 30-day mortality rates was explained by eight predictors. Lower 30-day mortality rates were associated with hospitals that had a higher percentage of Registered Nurse staff, a higher percentage of baccalaureate-prepared nurses, a lower dose or amount of all categories of nursing staff per weighted patient case, higher nurse-reported adequacy of staffing and resources, higher use of care maps or protocols to guide patient care, higher nurse-reported care quality, lower nurse-reported adequacy of manager ability and support, and higher nurse burnout.
Just as hospitals and clinicians caring for patients focus carefully on completing accurate diagnosis and appropriate and effective interventions, so too should hospitals carefully plan and manage structures and processes of care such as the proportion of Registered Nurses in the staff mix, percentage of baccalaureate-prepared nurses, and routine use of care maps to minimize unnecessary patient death.
Notes
Comment In: J Adv Nurs. 2007 Jun;58(6):612-3; author reply 613-417542804
PubMed ID
17184372 View in PubMed
Less detail

36 records – page 1 of 4.