Skip header and navigation

Refine By

13 records – page 1 of 2.

Adequacy of niacin, folate, and vitamin B12 intakes from foods among Newfoundland and Labrador adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113239
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2013;74(2):63-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Jennifer Colbourne
Natasha Baker
Peter Wang
Lin Liu
Christina Tucker
Barbara Roebothan
Author Affiliation
Division of Community Health and Humanities, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL, Canada.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2013;74(2):63-8
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cereals
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage - blood
Food, Fortified
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador
Niacin - administration & dosage - blood
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritional Status
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Recommended dietary allowances
Risk factors
Vitamin B 12 - administration & dosage - blood
Abstract
Adequacy of intake for niacin, folate, and vitamin B12 from food was estimated in an adult population in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL). Also considered was whether study findings support current Canadian food fortification policies.
Four hundred randomly selected adult NL residents were surveyed by telephone. Secondary analysis was performed on two 24-hour food recalls for each participant. Mean daily intakes of niacin, folate, and vitamin B12 were estimated from foods only and compared by sex/age subgroup. Adequacy of intakes was estimated. Contributions of folate by ready-to-eat cereal and bread products were also estimated.
Intakes of all three nutrients were higher in men. In comparison with recommendations, daily niacin intakes were as follows: excessive for 21.9% of all participants (and for 56.8% of men aged 28 to 54), within the recommended range for 73.6%, and less than adequate for 4.5%. In comparison with recommendations, daily folate intakes were as follows: within the recommended range for 18.1% of participants and less than adequate for 81.9%. In comparison with recommendations, daily vitamin B12 intakes were less than adequate for 36.3% of participants.
More than 20% of those surveyed were consuming, from food alone, niacin at levels above the maximum recommended. Food fortification policies pertaining to niacin should be revisited. In addition, despite fortification, NL adults may be consuming inadequate amounts of folate from foods.
PubMed ID
23750977 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing the validity of a self-administered food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) in the adult population of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114696
Source
Nutr J. 2013;12:49
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Lin Liu
Peizhong Peter Wang
Barbara Roebothan
Ann Ryan
Christina Sandra Tucker
Jennifer Colbourne
Natasha Baker
Michelle Cotterchio
Yanqing Yi
Guang Sun
Author Affiliation
Division of Community Health and Humanities, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University, 300 Prince Philip Drive, St. John's, NL A1B 3V6, Canada.
Source
Nutr J. 2013;12:49
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Carotenoids - administration & dosage
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Female
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador
Nutrition Assessment
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Vitamin A - administration & dosage
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Abstract
The Food- Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) is a dietary assessment tool frequently used in large-scale nutritional epidemiology studies. The goal of the present study is to validate a self-administered version of the Hawaii FFQ modified for use in the general adult population of Newfoundland and Labrador (NL).
Over a one year period, 195 randomly selected adults completed four 24-hour dietary recalls (24-HDRs) by telephone and one subsequent self-administered FFQ. Estimates of energy and nutrients derived from the 24-HDRs and FFQs were compared (protein, carbohydrate, fibre, fat, vitamin A, carotene, vitamin D, and calcium). Data were analyzed using the Pearson's correlation coefficients, cross-classification method, and Bland-Altman plots.
The mean nutrient intake values of the 24-HDRs were lower than those of the FFQs, except for protein in men. Sex and energy-adjusted de-attenuated Pearson correlation coefficients for each nutrient varied from 0.13 to 0.61. Except for protein in men, all correlations were statistically significant with p?
Notes
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2000 Feb 15;151(4):346-5710695593
Cites: Nutr J. 2012;11:1822449145
Cites: Eur J Neurol. 2000 Jul;7(4):413-2110971601
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Dec 15;154(12):1089-9911744511
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2001 Oct;4(5):971-8011784410
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2002 Aug;5(4):567-8712186666
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2002 Oct;5(5):691-912372164
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 2003 Feb;13(2):111-812559670
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2003 Feb;6(1):79-8612581469
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2003 May;6(3):313-2112740081
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2003 May 15;157(10):944-5412746248
Cites: Obes Res. 2003 Aug;11(8):945-912917498
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2004 Apr;7(2):319-2615003140
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1985 Jul;122(1):51-654014201
Cites: Lancet. 1986 Feb 8;1(8476):307-102868172
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1986 Jul;124(1):17-273521261
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1988 Feb;127(2):377-863337089
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1992 Jun;92(6):681-51607563
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1994 Jan;59(1 Suppl):262S-265S8279437
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1995 Aug 1;142(3):353-627631639
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1997 Apr;65(4 Suppl):1187S-1189S9094919
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1997;26 Suppl 1:S15-259126530
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1997 Nov 15;146(10):856-699384206
Cites: Stat Methods Med Res. 1999 Jun;8(2):135-6010501650
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Oct;70(4):439-4710500011
Cites: Nutr J. 2005;4:415703071
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2006 Feb;9(1):84-9316480538
Cites: Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2006 Nov-Dec;57(7-8):481-9317162327
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2008 Feb;11(2):183-9517610761
Cites: Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2008;17(4):629-3419114401
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Jul;109(7):1184-119319559135
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2009 Oct 20;101(8):1282-919773751
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2010 Jun;13(6):812-919968897
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2010 Sep;21(9):1513-2120506038
Cites: Nutr J. 2010;9:3620840739
Cites: Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2010 Dec;61(8):846-6220666692
Cites: Cad Saude Publica. 2010 Nov;26(11):2059-6721180979
Cites: PLoS One. 2011;6(5):e1965621589932
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2011 Sep-Oct;102(5):382-922032106
Cites: J Nutr Educ Behav. 2011 Nov-Dec;43(6):505-1021705276
Cites: Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2011;20(4):639-4522094851
Cites: Nutrients. 2010 Aug;2(8):805-1922254057
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(5):e3795822662256
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2000 Feb 15;151(4):358-7010695594
PubMed ID
23590645 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between carotid intima-media thickness and low-density lipoprotein size and susceptibility of low-density lipoprotein to oxidation in asymptomatic members of familial combined hyperlipidemia families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190376
Source
Stroke. 2002 May;33(5):1255-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
Ming-Lin Liu
Kati Ylitalo
Ilpo Nuotio
Riitta Salonen
Jukka T Salonen
Marja-Riitta Taskinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Stroke. 2002 May;33(5):1255-60
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antioxidants - analysis
Carotid Arteries - ultrasonography
Carotid Artery Diseases - blood - ultrasonography
Female
Finland
Humans
Hyperlipidemia, Familial Combined - blood
Lipoproteins, LDL - blood - chemistry
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Oxidation-Reduction
Particle Size
Predictive value of tests
Risk
Tunica Intima - ultrasonography
Tunica Media - ultrasonography
Abstract
In addition to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, small, dense LDL particles and oxidative modification of LDL have been linked to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The present study was aimed at investigating the association between carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and LDL particle size and susceptibility of LDL to oxidation in vitro in asymptomatic members of familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCHL) families.
LDL particle size, susceptibility of LDL to oxidation in vitro, and carotid IMT were measured in 148 asymptomatic FCHL family members.
LDL particle size and lag time for LDL oxidation were reduced in hyperlipidemic compared with normolipidemic family members. LDL particle size, serum total cholesterol, and alpha-tocopherol in LDL were independently associated with lag time for LDL oxidation in multivariate analysis. LDL particle size was associated with carotid mean IMT independently of clinical, lipid, and antioxidant variables in multivariate analysis. Although the susceptibility of LDL to oxidation in vitro was correlated with mean IMT, it did not have a significant independent contribution to variation in mean IMT in the multivariate model.
We conclude that LDL particle size but not susceptibility of LDL to oxidation in vitro is independently associated with carotid IMT in asymptomatic FCHL family members. These results imply that small, dense LDL as an inherent feature of FCHL is an important diagnostic indicator for coronary artery disease risk in FCHL.
Notes
Comment In: Stroke. 2002 May;33(5):1174-511988582
PubMed ID
11988600 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of total energy intake and macronutrient consumption with colorectal cancer risk: results from a large population-based case-control study in Newfoundland and Labrador and Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125827
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:18
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Zhuoyu Sun
Lin Liu
Peizhong Peter Wang
Barbara Roebothan
Jin Zhao
Elizabeth Dicks
Michelle Cotterchio
Sharon Buehler
Peter T Campbell
John R McLaughlin
Patrick S Parfrey
Author Affiliation
Division of Community Health and Humanities, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St, John's, NL, Canada.
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:18
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cholesterol - administration & dosage
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Fatty Acids - administration & dosage
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - administration & dosage
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Diet is regarded as one of the most important environmental factors associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. A recent report comprehensively concluded that total energy intake does not have a simple relationship with CRC risk, and that the data were inconsistent for carbohydrate, cholesterol and protein. The objective of this study was to identify the associations of CRC risk with dietary intakes of total energy, protein, fat, carbohydrate, fiber, and alcohol using data from a large case-control study conducted in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) and Ontario (ON), Canada.
Incident colorectal cancer cases (n = 1760) were identified from population-based cancer registries in the provinces of ON (1997-2000) and NL (1999-2003). Controls (n = 2481) were a random sample of residents in each province, aged 20-74 years. Family history questionnaire (FHQ), personal history questionnaire (PHQ), and food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) were used to collect study data. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association of intakes of total energy, macronutrients and alcohol with CRC risk.
Total energy intake was associated with higher risk of CRC (OR: 1.56; 95% CI: 1.21-2.01, p-trend = 0.02, 5th versus 1st quintile), whereas inverse associations emerged for intakes of protein (OR: 0.85, 95%CI: 0.69-1.00, p-trend = 0.06, 5th versus 1st quintile), carbohydrate (OR: 0.81, 95%CI: 0.63-1.00, p-trend = 0.05, 5th versus 1st quintile) and total dietary fiber (OR: 0.84, 95% CI:0.67-0.99, p-trend = 0.04, 5th versus 1st quintile). Total fat, alcohol, saturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and cholesterol were not associated with CRC risk.
This study provides further evidence that high energy intake may increase risk of incident CRC, whereas diets high in protein, fiber, and carbohydrate may reduce the risk of the disease.
Notes
Cites: Nat Rev Cancer. 2004 Oct;4(10):769-8015510158
Cites: World J Gastroenterol. 2011 Jan 28;17(4):444-821274373
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 1994 Jan;5(1):38-528123778
Cites: Cancer Res. 1994 May 1;54(9):2390-78162586
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1995 Aug 1;142(3):353-627631639
Cites: Nutr Hosp. 2005 Jan-Feb;20(1):18-2515762416
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2005 Sep;16(7):865-7516132797
Cites: J Environ Sci Health C Environ Carcinog Ecotoxicol Rev. 2004;22(2):91-14716291519
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2006 Jan 18;98(2):135-816418516
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 Feb 7;103(6):1768-7316446459
Cites: Cancer Control. 2007 Jan;14(1):78-8517242674
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2007 Apr;16(4):668-7517416756
Cites: Rev Esp Enferm Dig. 2007 Apr;99(4):190-20017590100
Cites: Proc Nutr Soc. 2011 May;70(2):194-20421385524
Cites: Eur J Cancer Prev. 2011 Sep;20(5):389-9521558858
Cites: Carcinogenesis. 2011 Sep;32(9):1381-721665891
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2011 Sep-Oct;102(5):382-922032106
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2007 Oct 17;99(20):1534-4317925539
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2007 Nov;53(11):1913-2018000268
Cites: Nucleic Acids Res. 2007;35(22):7485-9617942423
Cites: Nutr Cancer. 2008;60(2):131-4418444144
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Jul;88(1):176-8418614739
Cites: Proc Nutr Soc. 2008 Aug;67(3):253-618452640
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2009 Jan;18(1):267-7419124508
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2000 Feb 15;151(4):346-5710695593
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2000 Feb 15;151(4):358-7010695594
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2001 May;10(5):439-4611352852
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2002 Mar 10;98(2):241-5611857415
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2002 Feb;11(2):187-9311867506
Cites: Ann Oncol. 2002 Mar;13(3):369-7311996466
Cites: Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2003 Jan;11(1):55-6412505488
Cites: Gut. 2003 Jun;52(6):868-7312740344
Cites: Virchows Arch. 2003 Aug;443(2):139-4512845531
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2003 Nov 15;158(10):951-6214607803
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2004 Apr;7(2):319-2615003140
Cites: Am J Health Behav. 2009 Sep-Oct;33(5):513-2019296741
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2009 Jul 1;125(1):171-8019350627
Cites: Hepatology. 2009 Jun;49(6):1935-4319475691
Cites: Adv Med Sci. 2009;54(1):51-819482725
Cites: Public Health. 2009 Aug;123(8):540-419664792
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2009 Oct 20;101(8):1282-919773751
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2009 Nov;63 Suppl 4:S37-6019888280
Cites: Gut. 2009 Dec;58(12):1637-4319570763
Cites: Trends Pharmacol Sci. 2010 Feb;31(2):89-9820097433
Cites: Dis Colon Rectum. 2010 May;53(5):830-720389219
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2010 Jun 1;171(11):1174-8220452999
Cites: Nutr Cancer. 2010;62(6):701-920661817
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2010 Sep;21(9):1513-2120506038
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Sep;92(3):471-9020729339
Cites: Scand J Gastroenterol. 2010 Oct;45(10):1223-3120500015
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2010 Sep;46(14):2555-6220843485
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol. 2010 Oct;34(5):562-720702156
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2010 Jul-Aug;101(4):281-921033532
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2010 Dec;104(11):1703-1120579406
Cites: Int J Biol Markers. 2010 Oct-Dec;25(4):195-921161940
Cites: J Immigr Minor Health. 2011 Feb;13(1):15-2620490685
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1986 Jul;124(1):17-273521261
PubMed ID
22449145 View in PubMed
Less detail

Asthma Associates With Human Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm and Rupture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274380
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2016 Mar;36(3):570-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Cong-Lin Liu
Holger Wemmelund
Yi Wang
Mengyang Liao
Jes S Lindholt
Søren P Johnsen
Henrik Vestergaard
Cleverson Fernandes
Galina K Sukhova
Xiang Cheng
Jin-Ying Zhang
Chongzhe Yang
Xiaozhu Huang
Alan Daugherty
Bruce D Levy
Peter Libby
Guo-Ping Shi
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2016 Mar;36(3):570-8
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - diagnosis - epidemiology
Aortic Rupture - diagnosis - epidemiology
Asthma - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Bronchodilator Agents - therapeutic use
Databases, Factual
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
Both asthma and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) involve inflammation. It remains unknown whether these diseases interact.
Databases analyzed included Danish National Registry of Patients, a population-based nationwide case-control study included all patients with ruptured AAA and age- and sex-matched AAA controls without rupture in Denmark from 1996 to 2012; Viborg vascular trial, subgroup study of participants from the population-based randomized Viborg vascular screening trial. Patients with asthma were categorized by hospital diagnosis, bronchodilator use, and the recorded use of other anti-asthma prescription medications. Logistic regression models were fitted to determine whether asthma associated with the risk of ruptured AAA in Danish National Registry of Patients and an independent risk of having an AAA at screening in the Viborg vascular trial. From the Danish National Registry of Patients study, asthma diagnosed
Notes
Cites: Circulation. 2009 Sep 15;120(11):973-8219720934
Cites: Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2016 Jan;36(1):69-7726543094
Cites: Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2010 Jun;30(6):1263-820360536
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1999 Nov;160(5 Pt 1):1532-910556116
Cites: Eur Respir J. 1999 Jan;13(1):190-610836347
Cites: Immunol Cell Biol. 2001 Apr;79(2):149-5311264709
Cites: Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2003 Oct;26(4):418-2214512006
Cites: Eur J Vasc Surg. 1991 Feb;5(1):53-72009986
Cites: Adv Immunol. 1992;51:323-821502977
Cites: Eur J Vasc Surg. 1993 Jul;7(4):386-908359293
Cites: Chest. 1993 Apr;103(4):1178-848131461
Cites: Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 1995 Aug;10(2):207-107655973
Cites: Trials. 2010;11:6720507582
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 Dec 7;107(49):21093-721078989
Cites: Clin Exp Allergy. 1995 Nov;25 Suppl 2:50-48590344
Cites: Eur Heart J. 1997 Apr;18(4):671-69129900
Cites: J Vasc Surg. 1998 Aug;28(2):226-339719317
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1999 Jan 21;340(3):197-2069895400
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1999 Aug;160(2):640-710430741
Cites: Thorax. 2005 Jul;60(7):529-3015994257
Cites: Circulation. 2005 Jul 12;112(2):232-4016009808
Cites: Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006 May;15(5):291-30316447304
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Feb 20;104(8):2855-6017301245
Cites: Med Care. 2007 Oct;45(10 Supl 2):S158-6517909375
Cites: J Clin Invest. 2007 Nov;117(11):3359-6817932568
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 Mar 5;360(10):1002-1419264689
Cites: Cardiol Rev. 2009 Sep-Oct;17(5):201-1019690470
Cites: Circ Res. 2011 May 27;108(11):1316-2721493897
Cites: Allergy. 2011 Sep;66(9):1231-4121557752
Cites: Hypertension. 2011 Oct;58(4):566-7221825231
Cites: J Asthma. 2011 Oct;48(8):767-7221899483
Cites: Br J Surg. 2012 May;99(5):655-6522389113
Cites: Clinics (Sao Paulo). 2012 Nov;67(11):1335-4323184213
Cites: Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2013 Sep;12(3):247-5323893808
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2013 Aug;132(2):328-35.e523628340
Cites: J Mol Cell Cardiol. 2014 Jul;72:20-724530901
Cites: J Am Heart Assoc. 2014 Jun;3(3):e00089724958781
Cites: EMBO Mol Med. 2014 Jul;6(7):952-6924963147
Cites: Curr Top Microbiol Immunol. 2015;388:39-6125553794
Cites: Cardiovasc J Afr. 2015 Jan-Feb;26(1):8-1225268111
Cites: Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2015 Jun;35(6):1520-525908767
Cites: PLoS One. 2015;10(10):e014173026517273
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2010 Apr;35(4):757-6020356987
PubMed ID
26868210 View in PubMed
Less detail

Circulating oxidized low-density lipoprotein and its association with carotid intima-media thickness in asymptomatic members of familial combined hyperlipidemia families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179571
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2004 Aug;24(8):1492-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Ming-Lin Liu
Kati Ylitalo
Riitta Salonen
Jukka T Salonen
Marja-Riitta Taskinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2004 Aug;24(8):1492-7
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antioxidants - analysis
Biological Markers
Carotid Arteries - ultrasonography - ultrastructure
Carotid Artery Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - ultrasonography
Dinoprost - analogs & derivatives - blood
Disease Susceptibility
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hyperlipidemia, Familial Combined - blood - genetics - pathology
Lipids - blood
Lipoproteins - blood
Lipoproteins, LDL - blood - chemistry
Male
Particle Size
Tunica Intima - ultrasonography - ultrastructure
Tunica Media - ultrasonography - ultrastructure
Abstract
Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL)is implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Circulating oxidation-specific epitopes on plasma Ox-LDL has been linked with coronary artery disease, but its determinants and its association with early development of atherosclerosis in familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCHL) has not been very well studied. This study aimed to investigate the determinants of the circulating Ox-LDL and the association between Ox-LDL and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) in asymptomatic members of FCHL families.
Ox-LDL, susceptibility of LDL to oxidation in vitro, plasma 8-isoprostane and antioxidants, lipids and lipoproteins, LDL particle size, and carotid IMT were measured in 150 asymptomatic FCHL family members. Affected FCHL family members had reduced LDL particle size and lag time for LDL oxidation, increased plasma levels of Ox-LDL, increased plasma urate and alpha-tocopherol, and a trend for the increase of 8-isoprostane as compared with nonaffected FCHL. Ox-LDL was independently associated with serum LDL cholesterol, apoB, and 8-isoprostane in multivariate analysis but only univariately correlated with LDL particle size and lag time for LDL oxidation. In addition, Ox-LDL was significantly associated with carotid mean IMT independently of other clinical and biochemical variables in a multivariate model.
Serum LDL cholesterol, apoB levels, and 8-isoprostane were the most important determinants of Ox-LDL. Ox-LDL is independently associated with carotid IMT in asymptomatic FCHL family members and can be used as a marker of early atherosclerosis in FCHL.
PubMed ID
15205217 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison in dietary patterns derived for the Canadian Newfoundland and Labrador population through two time-separated studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273570
Source
Nutr J. 2015;14:75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Zhi Chen
Peizhong Peter Wang
Lian Shi
Yun Zhu
Lin Liu
Zhiwei Gao
Janine Woodrow
Barbara Roebothan
Source
Nutr J. 2015;14:75
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Diet
Female
Fruit
Humans
Male
Meat
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador
Nutrition Assessment
Reproducibility of Results
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vegetables
Young Adult
Abstract
While a dietary pattern is often believed to be stable in a population, there is limited research assessing its stability over time. The objective of this study is to explore and compare major dietary patterns derived for the Canadian subpopulation residing in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL), through two time-separated studies using an identical method.
In this study, we derived and compared the major dietary patterns derived from two independent studies in the NL adult population. The first study was based on the healthy controls from a large population-based case-control study (CCS) in 2005. The second was from a food-frequency questionnaire validation project (FFQVP) conducted in 2012. In both studies, participants were recruited in the same manner and dietary information was collected by an identical self-administered food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Exploratory common factor analysis was conducted to identify major dietary patterns. A comparison was conducted between the two study populations.
Four major dietary patterns were identified: Meat, Vegetables/fruits, Fish, and Grains explaining 22%, 20%, 12% and 9% variance respectively, with a total variance of 63%. Three major dietary patterns were derived for the controls of the CCS: Meat, Plant-based diet, and Fish explaining 24%, 20%, and 10% variance respectively, with a total variance of 54%. As the Plant-based diet pattern derived for the CCS was a combination of the Vegetables/fruits and Grains patterns derived for the FFQVP, no considerable difference in dietary patterns was found between the two studies.
A comparison between two time-separated studies suggests that dietary patterns of the NL adult population have remained reasonably stable over almost a decade.
Notes
Cites: Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2013 Mar;23(3):250-622647416
Cites: Nutr J. 2013;12:4923590645
Cites: Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2013 Jun;23(6):528-3522534653
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2014 Mar 28;111(6):1109-1724160559
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2014;14:30224690512
Cites: Nutr J. 2015;14:825592002
Cites: Nutr J. 2012;11:1822449145
Cites: Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2012 Mar;63 Suppl 1:17-2822059432
Cites: Anticancer Res. 2012 Feb;32(2):687-9622287764
Cites: Eur J Cancer Prev. 2012 Jan;21(1):15-2321946864
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2011 Sep;14(9):1570-821557871
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2010 Dec;104(11):1703-1120579406
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2010 Jul-Aug;101(4):281-921033532
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2009 Oct 20;101(8):1282-919773751
Cites: Am J Health Behav. 2009 Sep-Oct;33(5):513-2019296741
Cites: Nutr Cancer. 2009;61(2):179-9319235034
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2005 Jul;94(1):100-1316115339
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2005 Sep 10;116(4):592-815825170
Cites: J Am Coll Nutr. 2005 Apr;24(2):115-2115798078
Cites: J Nutr. 2005 Apr;135(4):843-915795445
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2005 Feb 15;161(4):338-4515692077
Cites: BMJ. 1997 Jul 5;315(7099):13-79233319
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1995 Apr;24(2):313-207635591
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1995 Aug 1;142(3):353-627631639
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1991 Dec;91(12):1532-71960345
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1990 Oct;52(4):739-452403067
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1988 Apr 14;318(15):995-63352691
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2004 Apr;7(2):319-2615003140
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Dec;78(6):1103-1014668271
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2001 Mar;85(3):363-7311299082
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2002 Feb 5;136(3):201-911827496
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2015;15:6925636348
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2000 Feb 15;151(4):358-7010695594
Cites: World Health Organ Tech Rep Ser. 2003;916:i-viii, 1-149, backcover12768890
PubMed ID
26231925 View in PubMed
Less detail

Four major dietary patterns identified for a target-population of adults residing in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267391
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:69
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Zhi Chen
Lin Liu
Barbara Roebothan
Ann Ryan
Jennifer Colbourne
Natasha Baker
Jing Yan
Peizhong Peter Wang
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:69
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Newfoundland and Labrador
Questionnaires
Abstract
Very limited nutritional epidemiological studies conducted to explore the unique dietary exposure in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL). This study aims to identify and characterize major dietary patterns in the target-population from general adult NL residents and assess the associations with selected demographic factors.
A total of 192 participants, aged 35-70 years, completed and returned a food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and participated in a telephone interview to collect demographic information. Dietary patterns were identified by common factor analysis. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were used to assess determinants of the different food consumption patterns. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated for food scores of each pattern, total energy, and energy-adjusted nutrient intakes.
Factor analyses identified four dietary patterns, which were labeled as "Meat", "Vegetable/fruit", "Fish", and "Grain" patterns. In combination, the four dietary patterns explained 63% of the variance in dietary habits of the study population. Multivariate linear regression analysis indicated an increasing trend of factor scores for Meat and Grain pattern with age. Male participants were found to be more likely to choose the Meat and Fish patterns. Current smokers and those married/living together tend to choose the Grain pattern. Pearson's correlation coefficients showed positive correlations between fat and cholesterol and the Meat pattern, fiber and the Vegetable/fruits pattern, protein and the Fish pattern, and carbohydrates and the Grain pattern.
This study derived four dietary patterns and obtained their significant associations with specific demographic characteristics in this population. It identified one dietary consumption pattern (Fish) not yet seen in other studied populations. These findings will update the current dietary-health information published in this province, and contribute to further research into the association between dietary practices and health.
Notes
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2011 Sep;14(9):1570-821557871
Cites: Eur J Cancer Prev. 2011 Sep;20(5):389-9521558858
Cites: J Nutr. 2012 Feb;142(2):284-9122190026
Cites: Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2013 Mar;23(3):250-622647416
Cites: Nutr J. 2013;12:4923590645
Cites: Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2013 Jun;23(6):528-3522534653
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2000 Feb 15;151(4):358-7010695594
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2001 Mar;85(3):363-7311299082
Cites: Nutr Health. 2001;15(1):69-7011403376
Cites: Curr Opin Lipidol. 2002 Feb;13(1):3-911790957
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2002 Feb 5;136(3):201-911827496
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 May;77(5):1156-6312716666
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Dec;78(6):1103-1014668271
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2004 Apr;7(2):319-2615003140
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1981 Apr;34(4):568-807223707
Cites: Br J Nutr. 1990 Sep;64(2):319-292223737
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1995 Aug 1;142(3):353-627631639
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2004 Nov 8;164(20):2235-4015534160
Cites: J Nutr. 2005 Apr;135(4):843-915795445
Cites: J Am Coll Nutr. 2005 Apr;24(2):115-2115798078
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2005 Sep 10;116(4):592-815825170
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2005 Jul;94(1):100-1316115339
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2008;8:37018950509
Cites: Am J Health Behav. 2009 Sep-Oct;33(5):513-2019296741
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2009 Oct 20;101(8):1282-919773751
Cites: BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2010;11:2020109205
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2010 Apr;35(2):199-20620383233
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2010 Apr;35(2):207-1020383234
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2010 Apr;35(2):211-820383235
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2010 Oct;104(8):1230-4020487579
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2010 Dec;104(11):1703-1120579406
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2010 Dec;104(11):1662-520691126
Cites: Eur J Cancer Prev. 2012 Jan;21(1):15-2321946864
PubMed ID
25636348 View in PubMed
Less detail

Occurrence and Risk Assessment of PAHs in Surface Sediments from Western Arctic and Subarctic Oceans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291107
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 Apr 12; 15(4):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-12-2018
Author
Fajin Chen
Yan Lin
Minggang Cai
Jingjing Zhang
Yuanbiao Zhang
Weiming Kuang
Lin Liu
Peng Huang
Hongwei Ke
Author Affiliation
Guangdong Province Key Laboratory for Coastal Ocean Variation and Disaster Prediction, Guangdong Ocean University, Zhanjiang 524088, China. fjchen04@163.com.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 Apr 12; 15(4):
Date
Apr-12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
In the fourth Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition (from July to September, 2010), 14 surface sediment samples were collected from the Bering Sea, Chukchi Sea, and Canadian Basin to examine the spatial distributions, potential sources, as well as ecological and health risk assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The ?PAH (refers to the sum of 16 priority PAHs) concentration range from 27.66 ng/g to 167.48 ng/g (dry weight, d.w.). Additionally, the concentrations of ?PAH were highest in the margin edges of the Canadian Basin, which may originate from coal combustion with an accumulation of Canadian point sources and river runoff due to the surface ocean currents. The lowest levels occurred in the northern of Canadian Basin, and the levels of ?PAH in the Chukchi Sea were slightly higher than those in the Being Sea. Three isomer ratios of PAHs (Phenanthrene/Anthracene, BaA/(BaA+Chy), and LMW/HMW) were used to investigate the potential sources of PAHs, which showed the main source of combustion combined with weaker petroleum contribution. Compared with four sediment quality guidelines, the concentrations of PAH are much lower, indicating a low potential ecological risk. All TEQPAH also showed a low risk to human health. Our study revealed the important role of the ocean current on the redistribution of PAHs in the Arctic.
Notes
Cites: Mar Pollut Bull. 2008 Mar;56(3):565-73 PMID 18230401
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2002 Nov 15;36(22):4811-7 PMID 12487304
Cites: J Chromatogr A. 2010 Feb 19;1217(8):1191-202 PMID 20034632
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2002 May 27;291(1-3):229-46 PMID 12150440
Cites: Environ Pollut. 2007 Mar;146(1):196-205 PMID 16949188
Cites: Chemosphere. 2007 May;68(1):85-92 PMID 17267023
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2005 Apr 15;342(1-3):119-44 PMID 15866271
Cites: Mar Pollut Bull. 2013 Dec 15;77(1-2):147-64 PMID 24210222
Cites: Environ Pollut. 2004;128(1-2):139-48 PMID 14667724
Cites: Mar Pollut Bull. 2003 Apr;46(4):466-74 PMID 12705920
Cites: Mar Pollut Bull. 2005 Mar;50(3):319-26 PMID 15757695
Cites: Environ Pollut. 1999;100(1-3):209-21 PMID 15093119
Cites: Mar Pollut Bull. 2002 Dec;44(12 ):1421-6 PMID 12523548
Cites: Environ Pollut. 2017 Aug;227:498-504 PMID 28494402
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2005 Dec 1;351-352:264-84 PMID 16085280
Cites: Mar Pollut Bull. 2001 Jan;42(1):36-44 PMID 11382982
Cites: Environ Pollut. 2015 Oct;205:394-402 PMID 26208321
Cites: Mar Environ Res. 2009 Dec;68(5):236-45 PMID 19643470
Cites: Chemosphere. 2017 Oct;184:916-923 PMID 28651318
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2009 Aug 1;43(15):5633-9 PMID 19731655
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2000 Jun 1;254(2-3):93-234 PMID 10885446
Cites: Mar Pollut Bull. 2014 Dec 15;89(1-2):494-498 PMID 24661458
Cites: Mar Pollut Bull. 2001 Nov;42(11):1017-30 PMID 11763212
Cites: Environ Pollut. 2004;128(1-2):85-97 PMID 14667722
Cites: Mar Pollut Bull. 2004 Dec;49(11-12):1084-96 PMID 15556196
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2012 Jan 3;46(1):259-67 PMID 22103582
Cites: Mar Pollut Bull. 2001 Nov;42(11):1073-81 PMID 11763218
Cites: Integr Environ Assess Manag. 2005 Jan;1(1):22-33 PMID 16637144
Cites: Geochem Trans. 2014 Mar 19;15(1):2 PMID 24641695
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2003 May 1;306(1-3):39-56 PMID 12699917
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2017 Dec 31;609:577-586 PMID 28763655
Cites: Environ Int. 2013 Oct;60:71-80 PMID 24013021
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Nov 15;44(22):8422-8 PMID 20977270
Cites: Environ Pollut. 2011 Oct;159(10):2665-74 PMID 21719172
Cites: Environ Pollut. 2009 Apr;157(4):1342-51 PMID 19135764
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2006 Dec 15;40(24):7570-6 PMID 17256496
Cites: Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2015 Oct;22(20):15432-42 PMID 26341340
Cites: Mar Pollut Bull. 2017 Apr 15;117(1-2):507-511 PMID 28187971
Cites: Environ Monit Assess. 2008 Jan;136(1-3):167-82 PMID 17380417
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Feb 1;44(3):1017-22 PMID 20039713
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2016 Sep 6;50(17 ):9161-8 PMID 27509536
Cites: FEMS Microbiol Rev. 2016 Nov 1;40(6):814-830 PMID 28201512
Cites: Ecotoxicology. 1996 Aug;5(4):253-78 PMID 24193815
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2016 Oct 1;566-567:1309-1317 PMID 27267726
PubMed ID
29649142 View in PubMed
Less detail

Occurrence and Risk Assessment of PAHs in Surface Sediments from Western Arctic and Subarctic Oceans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297500
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 04 12; 15(4):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-12-2018
Author
Fajin Chen
Yan Lin
Minggang Cai
Jingjing Zhang
Yuanbiao Zhang
Weiming Kuang
Lin Liu
Peng Huang
Hongwei Ke
Author Affiliation
Guangdong Province Key Laboratory for Coastal Ocean Variation and Disaster Prediction, Guangdong Ocean University, Zhanjiang 524088, China. fjchen04@163.com.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 04 12; 15(4):
Date
04-12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Canada
China
Environmental monitoring
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Humans
Oceans and Seas
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
In the fourth Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition (from July to September, 2010), 14 surface sediment samples were collected from the Bering Sea, Chukchi Sea, and Canadian Basin to examine the spatial distributions, potential sources, as well as ecological and health risk assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The ?PAH (refers to the sum of 16 priority PAHs) concentration range from 27.66 ng/g to 167.48 ng/g (dry weight, d.w.). Additionally, the concentrations of ?PAH were highest in the margin edges of the Canadian Basin, which may originate from coal combustion with an accumulation of Canadian point sources and river runoff due to the surface ocean currents. The lowest levels occurred in the northern of Canadian Basin, and the levels of ?PAH in the Chukchi Sea were slightly higher than those in the Being Sea. Three isomer ratios of PAHs (Phenanthrene/Anthracene, BaA/(BaA+Chy), and LMW/HMW) were used to investigate the potential sources of PAHs, which showed the main source of combustion combined with weaker petroleum contribution. Compared with four sediment quality guidelines, the concentrations of PAH are much lower, indicating a low potential ecological risk. All TEQPAH also showed a low risk to human health. Our study revealed the important role of the ocean current on the redistribution of PAHs in the Arctic.
PubMed ID
29649142 View in PubMed
Less detail

13 records – page 1 of 2.