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Factors associated with tuberculin conversion in Canadian microbiology and pathology workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187706
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2003 Feb 15;167(4):599-602
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-2003
Author
Dick Menzies
Anne Fanning
Lillian Yuan
J Mark FitzGerald
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Dick.menzies@mcgill.ca
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2003 Feb 15;167(4):599-602
Date
Feb-15-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Medical Laboratory Personnel
Microbiology
Multivariate Analysis
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Pathology
Risk factors
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Tuberculosis - epidemiology
Abstract
The risk of occupational tuberculosis (TB) infection and associated factors was estimated among all microbiology and pathology technicians and compared with a sample of nonclinical personnel in 17 Canadian acute care hospitals. Participants underwent tuberculin skin testing and completed questionnaires. Prior skin tests and vaccinations and all patients with TB hospitalized in the preceding 3 years were reviewed. Of the work areas where direction of air flow and air changes per hour were measured, only 51% were adequately ventilated. Among participating lab workers the average annual risk of tuberculin conversion was 1.0%. This was associated with lower hourly air exchange rates (16.7 versus 32.5 in workers with no conversion, p
PubMed ID
12446271 View in PubMed
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