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Associations Between Reasons to Go Outdoors and Objectively-Measured Walking Activity in Various Life-Space Areas Among Older People.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277247
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2016 Jan;24(1):85-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Li-Tang Tsai
Merja Rantakokko
Anne Viljanen
Milla Saajanaho
Johanna Eronen
Taina Rantanen
Erja Portegijs
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2016 Jan;24(1):85-91
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accelerometry
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Residence Characteristics
Walking - physiology
Abstract
This cross-sectional study investigated associations between reasons to go outdoors and objectively-measured walking activity in various life-space areas among older people. During the study, 174 community-dwelling older people aged 75-90 from central Finland wore an accelerometer over seven days and recorded their reasons to go outdoors in an activity diary. The most common reasons for going outdoors were shopping, walking for exercise, social visits, and running errands. Activities done in multiple life-space areas contributed more to daily step counts than those done in the neighborhood or town and beyond. Those who went shopping or walked for exercise accumulated higher daily step counts than those who did not go outdoors for these reasons. These results show that shopping and walking for exercise are common reasons to go outdoors for community-dwelling older people and may facilitate walking activity in older age. Future studies on how individual trips contribute to the accumulation of steps are warranted.
PubMed ID
25951008 View in PubMed
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Individual and environmental factors underlying life space of older people - study protocol and design of a cohort study on life-space mobility in old age (LISPE).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118779
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:1018
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Taina Rantanen
Erja Portegijs
Anne Viljanen
Johanna Eronen
Milla Saajanaho
Li-Tang Tsai
Markku Kauppinen
Eeva-Maija Palonen
Sarianna Sipilä
Susanne Iwarsson
Merja Rantakokko
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Center and Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, P,O,Box 35, Jyväskylä, FI-40014, Finland. taina.rantanen@jyu.fi
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:1018
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Quality of Life
Walking
Abstract
A crucial issue for the sustainability of societies is how to maintain health and functioning in older people. With increasing age, losses in vision, hearing, balance, mobility and cognitive capacity render older people particularly exposed to environmental barriers. A central building block of human functioning is walking. Walking difficulties may start to develop in midlife and become increasingly prevalent with age. Life-space mobility reflects actual mobility performance by taking into account the balance between older adults internal physiologic capacity and the external challenges they encounter in daily life. The aim of the Life-Space Mobility in Old Age (LISPE) project is to examine how home and neighborhood characteristics influence people's health, functioning, disability, quality of life and life-space mobility in the context of aging. In addition, examine whether a person's health and function influence life-space mobility.
This paper describes the study protocol of the LISPE project, which is a 2-year prospective cohort study of community-dwelling older people aged 75 to 90 (n?=?848). The data consists of a baseline survey including face-to-face interviews, objective observation of the home environment and a physical performance test in the participant's home. All the baseline participants will be interviewed over the phone one and two years after baseline to collect data on life-space mobility, disability and participation restriction. Additional home interviews and environmental evaluations will be conducted for those who relocate during the study period. Data on mortality and health service use will be collected from national registers. In a substudy on walking activity and life space, 358 participants kept a 7-day diary and, in addition, 176 participants also wore an accelerometer.
Our study, which includes extensive data collection with a large sample, provides a unique opportunity to study topics of importance for aging societies. A novel approach is employed which enables us to study the interactions of environmental features and individual characteristics underlying the life-space of older people. Potentially, the results of this study will contribute to improvements in strategies to postpone or prevent progression to disability and loss of independence.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23170987 View in PubMed
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Moving through Life-Space Areas and Objectively Measured Physical Activity of Older People.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273374
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135308
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Erja Portegijs
Li-Tang Tsai
Taina Rantanen
Merja Rantakokko
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135308
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accelerometry
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Life Style
Male
Motor Activity
Reproducibility of Results
Residence Characteristics
Spatial Navigation
Walking
Abstract
Physical activity-an important determinant of health and function in old age-may vary according to the life-space area reached. Our aim was to study how moving through greater life-space areas is associated with greater physical activity of community-dwelling older people. The association between objectively measured physical activity and life-space area reached on different days by the same individual was studied using one-week longitudinal data, to provide insight in causal relationships.
One-week surveillance of objectively assessed physical activity of community-dwelling 70-90-year-old people in central Finland from the "Life-space mobility in old age" cohort substudy (N = 174). In spring 2012, participants wore an accelerometer for 7 days and completed a daily diary including the largest life-space area reached (inside home, outside home, neighborhood, town, and beyond town). The daily step count, and the time in moderate (incl. walking) and low activity and sedentary behavior were assessed. Differences in physical activity between days on which different life-space areas were reached were tested using Generalized Estimation Equation models (within-group comparison).
Participants' mean age was 80.4±4.2 years and 63.5% were female. Participants had higher average step counts (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
26252537 View in PubMed
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Older women's personal goals and exercise activity: an 8-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103083
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jul;22(3):386-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Milla Saajanaho
Anne Viljanen
Sanna Read
Merja Rantakokko
Li-Tang Tsai
Jaakko Kaprio
Marja Jylhä
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Center, Dept. of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jul;22(3):386-92
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Goals
Health Behavior
Humans
Independent living
Risk Reduction Behavior
Self Report
Abstract
This study investigated the associations of personal goals with exercise activity, as well as the relationships between exercise-related and other personal goals, among older women. Both cross-sectional and longitudinal designs were used with a sample of 308 women ages 66-79 at baseline. Women who reported exercise-related personal goals were 4 times as likely to report high exercise activity at baseline than those who did not report exercise-related goals. Longitudinal results were parallel. Goals related to cultural activities, as well as to busying oneself around the home, coincided with exercise-related goals, whereas goals related to own and other people's health and independent living lowered the odds of having exercise-related goals. Helping older adults to set realistic exercise-related goals that are compatible with their other life goals may yield an increase in their exercise activity, but this should be evaluated in a controlled trial.
PubMed ID
23945665 View in PubMed
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Personal goals and changes in life-space mobility among older people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275045
Source
Prev Med. 2015 Dec;81:163-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Milla Saajanaho
Merja Rantakokko
Erja Portegijs
Timo Törmäkangas
Johanna Eronen
Li-Tang Tsai
Marja Jylhä
Taina Rantanen
Source
Prev Med. 2015 Dec;81:163-7
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Exercise
Female
Finland
Goals
Humans
Male
Mobility Limitation
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Abstract
Life-space mobility - the spatial extent of mobility in daily life - is associated with quality of life and physical functioning but may also be influenced by future orientation expressed in personal goals. The aim of this study was to explore how different personal goals predict changes in older people's life-space mobility.
This prospective cohort study with a 2-year follow-up included 824 community-dwelling people aged 75 to 90 years from the municipalities of Jyväskylä and Muurame in Central Finland. As part of the Life-Space Mobility in Old Age study (LISPE), which was conducted between 2012 and 2014, the participants responded to the Life-Space Assessment and Personal Project Analysis in addition to questions on socio-demographics and health. Data were analyzed using generalized estimation equation models.
The results showed that goals indicating a desire to be active in daily life, to stay mentally alert, and to exercise were associated with higher life-space mobility, and that the associations remained over the follow-up years. Goals related to maintaining functioning predicted higher life-space mobility at the 2-year follow-up. In contrast, goals reflecting improvement of poor physical functioning predicted lower life-space mobility. The results remained significant even when adjusted for indicators of health and functioning.
This study indicates that supporting older people in striving for relevant personal goals in their lives might contribute to a larger life-space and thus also to improved quality of life in old age.
PubMed ID
26348450 View in PubMed
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Physical Limitations, Walkability, Perceived Environmental Facilitators and Physical Activity of Older Adults in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286530
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 Mar 22;14(3)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-22-2017
Author
Erja Portegijs
Kirsi E Keskinen
Li-Tang Tsai
Taina Rantanen
Merja Rantakokko
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 Mar 22;14(3)
Date
Mar-22-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Architectural Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environment Design
Exercise
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Geriatric Assessment
Health promotion
Housing for the Elderly - standards
Humans
Male
Mobility Limitation
Quality of Life
Residence Characteristics
Socioeconomic Factors
Walking
Abstract
The aim was to study objectively assessed walkability of the environment and participant perceived environmental facilitators for outdoor mobility as predictors of physical activity in older adults with and without physical limitations. 75-90-year-old adults living independently in Central Finland were interviewed (n = 839) and reassessed for self-reported physical activity one or two years later (n = 787). Lower-extremity physical limitations were defined as Short Physical Performance Battery score =9. Number of perceived environmental facilitators was calculated from a 16-item checklist. Walkability index (land use mix, street connectivity, population density) of the home environment was calculated from geographic information and categorized into tertiles. Accelerometer-based step counts were registered for one week (n = 174). Better walkability was associated with higher numbers of perceived environmental facilitators (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
28327543 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.