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Data mining: comparing the empiric CFS to the Canadian ME/CFS case definition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132382
Source
J Clin Psychol. 2012 Jan;68(1):41-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Leonard A Jason
Beth Skendrovic
Jacob Furst
Abigail Brown
Angela Weng
Christine Bronikowski
Author Affiliation
DePaul University, USA. Ljason@depaul.edu
Source
J Clin Psychol. 2012 Jan;68(1):41-9
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Chicago
Chronic Disease
Data Mining - methods
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Fatigue - diagnosis
Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic - diagnosis
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Reproducibility of Results
Risk
Sensitivity and specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
This article contrasts two case definitions for myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). We compared the empiric CFS case definition (Reeves et al., 2005) and the Canadian ME/CFS clinical case definition (Carruthers et al., 2003) with a sample of individuals with CFS versus those without. Data mining with decision trees was used to identify the best items to identify patients with CFS. Data mining is a statistical technique that was used to help determine which of the survey questions were most effective for accurately classifying cases. The empiric criteria identified about 79% of patients with CFS and the Canadian criteria identified 87% of patients. Items identified by the Canadian criteria had more construct validity. The implications of these findings are discussed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21823124 View in PubMed
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From good health to illness with post-infectious fatigue syndrome: a qualitative study of adults' experiences of the illness trajectory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286705
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2017 Mar 27;18(1):49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-27-2017
Author
Eva Stormorken
Leonard A Jason
Marit Kirkevold
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2017 Mar 27;18(1):49
Date
Mar-27-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Disease Outbreaks
Disease Progression
Drinking Water - parasitology
Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic - etiology - physiopathology
Female
Giardia lamblia
Giardiasis - complications - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Qualitative Research
Recovery of Function
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Municipal drinking water contaminated with the parasite Giardia lamblia in Bergen, Norway, in 2004 caused an outbreak of gastrointestinal infection in 2500 people, according to the Norwegian Prescription Database. In the aftermath a minor group subsequently developed post-infectious fatigue syndrome (PIFS). Persons in this minor group had laboratory-confirmed parasites in their stool samples, and their enteritis had been cured by one or more courses of antibiotic treatment. The study's purpose was to explore how the affected persons experienced the illness trajectory and various PIFS disabilities.
A qualitative design with in-depth interviews was used to obtain first-hand experiences of PIFS. To get an overall understanding of their perceived illness trajectory, the participants were asked to retrospectively rate their functional level at different points in time. A maximum variation sample of adults diagnosed with PIFS according to the international 1994 criteria was recruited from a cohort of persons diagnosed with PIFS at a tertiary Neurology Outpatient Clinic in Western Norway. The sample comprised 19 women and seven men (mean age 41 years, range 26-59). The interviews were fully transcribed and subjected to a qualitative content analysis.
All participants had been living healthy lives pre-illness. The time to develop PIFS varied. Multiple disabilities in the physical, cognitive, emotional, neurological, sleep and intolerance domains were described. Everyone more or less dropped out from studies or work, and few needed to be taken care of during the worst period. The severity of these disabilities varied among the participants and during the illness phases. Despite individual variations, an overall pattern of illness trajectory emerged. Five phases were identified: prodromal, downward, turning, upward and chronic phase. All reached a nadir followed by varying degrees of improvement in their functional ability. None regained pre-illness health or personal and professional abilities.
The needs of persons with this condition are not met. Early diagnosis and interdisciplinary rehabilitation could be beneficial in altering the downward trajectory at an earlier stage, avoiding the most severe disability and optimising improvement. Enhanced knowledge among health professionals, tailored treatment, rest as needed, financial support and practical help would likely improve prognosis.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28347294 View in PubMed
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