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14-Year Survey in a Swedish County Reveals a Pronounced Increase in Bloodstream Infections (BSI). Comorbidity - An Independent Risk Factor for Both BSI and Mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283680
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(11):e0166527
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Martin Holmbom
Christian G Giske
Mats Fredrikson
Åse Östholm Balkhed
Carina Claesson
Lennart E Nilsson
Mikael Hoffmann
Håkan Hanberger
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(11):e0166527
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Bacteremia - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Candidiasis - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Community-Acquired Infections
Comorbidity
Cross Infection - epidemiology - microbiology
Female
Fungemia - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
we assessed the incidence, risk factors and outcome of BSI over a 14-year period (2000-2013) in a Swedish county.
retrospective cohort study on culture confirmed BSI among patients in the county of Östergötland, Sweden, with approximately 440,000 inhabitants. A BSI was defined as either community-onset BSI (CO-BSI) or hospital-acquired BSI (HA-BSI).
of a total of 11,480 BSIs, 67% were CO-BSI and 33% HA-BSI. The incidence of BSI increased by 64% from 945 to 1,546 per 100,000 hospital admissions per year during the study period. The most prominent increase, 83% was observed within the CO-BSI cohort whilst HA-BSI increased by 32%. Prescriptions of antibiotics in outpatient care decreased with 24% from 422 to 322 prescriptions dispensed/1,000 inhabitants/year, whereas antibiotics prescribed in hospital increased by 67% (from 424 to 709 DDD per 1,000 days of care). The overall 30-day mortality for HA-BSIs was 17.2%, compared to 10.6% for CO-BSIs, with an average yearly increase per 100,000 hospital admissions of 2 and 5% respectively. The proportion of patients with one or more comorbidities, increased from 20.8 to 55.3%. In multivariate analyses, risk factors for mortality within 30 days were: HA-BSI (2.22); two or more comorbidities (1.89); single comorbidity (1.56); CO-BSI (1.21); male (1.05); and high age (1.04).
this survey revealed an alarming increase in the incidence of BSI over the 14-year study period. Interventions to decrease BSI in general should be considered together with robust antibiotic stewardship programmes to avoid both over- and underuse of antibiotics.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27835663 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibiotic susceptibility patterns and clones of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Swedish ICUs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156450
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2008;40(6-7):487-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Marcus Erlandsson
Hans Gill
David Nordlinder
Christian G Giske
Daniel Jonas
Lennart E Nilsson
Sten Walther
Håkan Hanberger
Author Affiliation
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. marcus_e@telia.com
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2008;40(6-7):487-94
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Cluster analysis
Cross Infection - epidemiology - microbiology
DNA, Bacterial - genetics
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial
Genotype
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Phenotype
Pseudomonas Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Pseudomonas aeruginosa - classification - drug effects - isolation & purification
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Pseudomonas aeruginosa is 1 of the bacteria most adaptive to anti-bacterial treatment. Previous studies have shown nosocomial spread and transmission of clonal strains of P. aeruginosa in European hospitals. In this study we investigated antibiotic susceptibility and clonality in 101 P. aeruginosa isolates from 88 patients admitted to 8 Swedish ICUs during 2002. We also compared phenotypes and genotypes of P. aeruginosa and carried out cluster analysis to determine if phenotypic data can be used for surveillance of clonal spread. All isolates were collected on clinical indication as part of the NPRS II study in Sweden and were subjected to AFLP analysis for genotyping. 68 isolates with unique genotypes were found. Phenotyping was performed using MIC values for 5 anti-pseudomonal agents. Almost 6% of the isolates were multi-drug resistant (MDR), and this figure rose to almost 8% when intermediate isolates were also included. We found probable clonal spread in 9 cases, but none of them was found to be an MDR strain. Phenotypical cluster analysis produced 40 clusters. Comparing partitions did not demonstrate any significant concordance between the typing methods. The conclusion of our study is that cross-transmission and clonal spread of MDR P. aeruginosa does not present a clinical problem in Swedish ICUs, but probable cross-transmission of non-MDR clones indicate a need for improved hygiene routines bedside. The phenotype clusters were not concordant with genotype clusters, and genotyping is still recommended for epidemiological tracking.
PubMed ID
18584536 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antimicrobial activity of tigecycline and comparative agents against clinical isolates of staphylococci and enterococci from ICUs and general hospital wards at three Swedish university hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152942
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2009;41(3):171-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Carina Claesson
Lennart E Nilsson
Göran Kronvall
Mats Walder
Mikael Sörberg
Author Affiliation
Clinical Microbiology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoping University, Linkoping, Sweden. carcl@imk.liu.se
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2009;41(3):171-81
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Carbon-Oxygen Ligases - genetics
Enterococcus - drug effects - genetics - isolation & purification
Hospitals, University
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Methicillin Resistance - genetics
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Minocycline - analogs & derivatives - pharmacology
Patients' Rooms
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Staphylococcus - drug effects - genetics - isolation & purification
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Vancomycin Resistance - genetics
Abstract
The activities of tigecycline and comparative agents on staphylococci and enterococci isolated from patients at general hospital wards (GHWs) and intensive care units (ICUs) at 3 university hospitals in Sweden were investigated. Oxacillin disc diffusion and minimal inhibitory concentration with E-test were used. The presence of mecA, vanA or vanB genes was determined with PCR. Statistically significant higher incidence of clindamycin, fusidic acid, rifampicin and multidrug-resistant CoNS was found at ICUs compared to GHWs. Resistance rates were low among S. aureus. Tigecycline, linezolid and vancomycin were the only agents with high activity against methicillin-resistant S. aureus and multidrug-resistant CoNS. Resistance rates were low among E. faecalis, except for high-level gentamicin-resistant (HLGR) E. faecalis. E. faecium showed high resistance rates to ampicillin, piperacillin/tazobactam and imipenem. The HLGR rates among E. faecium were lower than the rates for E. faecalis. Tigecycline and linezolid were the only drugs with high activity against all enterococci including vancomycin-resistant enterococci. No statistically significant differences in susceptibility rates were found between the ward levels for S. aureus and enterococcal isolates and no statistically significant differences were found between the hospitals.
PubMed ID
19173129 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in the aerobic faecal flora of patients treated with antibiotics for acute intra-abdominal infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122290
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2012 Nov;44(11):820-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Annika Samuelsson
Barbro Isaksson
Abbas Chabok
Jon Jonasson
Lennart E Nilsson
Olle Eriksson
Håkan Hanberger
Author Affiliation
Department of Infection Control, University Hospital Linköping, Linköping, Sweden. annika.samuelsson@lio.se
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2012 Nov;44(11):820-7
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Bacteria, Aerobic - drug effects - isolation & purification
Cohort Studies
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Enterobacteriaceae - drug effects - isolation & purification
Feces - microbiology
Female
Humans
Intraabdominal Infections - drug therapy - microbiology
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
An open observational study was performed to investigate changes in the rectal flora and antibiotic susceptibility among faecal bacteria in patients treated with antibiotics for acute intra-abdominal infection.
One hundred and forty patients with acute intra-abdominal infection requiring antibiotic treatment and hospitalization were included. Eight surgical units from the southern part of Sweden participated, between January 2006 and November 2007. Antibiotic treatments were according to local guidelines. Rectal swabs were obtained on admission (sample 1) and 2-14 days after the end of antibiotic treatment (sample 2). Aerobic bacteria and yeasts were analysed. The material was divided into 2 groups: 1 group with Enterobacteriaceae and 1 group with non-fermentative Gram-negative bacteria. The susceptibility to antibiotics in each group was compared between samples 1 and 2.
The main finding of this study on patients with severe intra-abdominal infections was a shift in the aerobic faecal flora following antibiotic treatment, from Escherichia coli to other more resistant Enterobacteriaceae, Enterococcus faecium, and yeasts. The susceptibility to cephalosporins and piperacillin-tazobactam decreased in Enterobacteriaceae.
Following antibiotic treatment, a shift in the aerobic rectal flora to species with intrinsic antibiotic resistance was observed. This indicates that the emergence of resistance is not due to new mutations, but rather to selection of more resistant species. This should be taken into account when designing treatments for secondary intra-abdominal infections.
PubMed ID
22831634 View in PubMed
Less detail

A clonal outbreak of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus with concomitant resistance to erythromycin, clindamycin and tobramycin in a Swedish county.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152010
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2009;41(5):324-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Maria Lindqvist
Barbro Isaksson
Annika Samuelsson
Lennart E Nilsson
Anita Hallgren
Author Affiliation
Department of Infection Control, Linkoping University Hospital, Linkoping, Sweden. maria.m.lindqvist@lio.se
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2009;41(5):324-33
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Bacterial Toxins - genetics
Clindamycin - pharmacology
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial - genetics
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Erythromycin - pharmacology
Exotoxins - genetics
Gene Frequency
Genes, Bacterial - genetics
Humans
Leukocidins - genetics
Methicillin - pharmacology
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Molecular Epidemiology
Phylogeny
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Staphylococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Staphylococcal Protein A - genetics
Staphylococcus aureus - drug effects - genetics - isolation & purification
Sweden - epidemiology
Tobramycin - pharmacology
Abstract
In contrast to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), studies on clonal distribution of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) are scarce. Since 2004, an increasing incidence of concomitant resistance to erythromycin, clindamycin and tobramycin (ECT) among MSSA has been detected in Ostergotland County, Sweden. The objectives of this study were to investigate the genetic relatedness among these isolates with 2 genotyping methods, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and sequence-based typing of the polymorphic region X of the staphylococcal protein A gene (spa typing), and to determine the incidence of the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene. When genotyping 54 ECT-resistant MSSA isolates from 49 patients (1 isolate per patient per y), 91% were shown to be part of a clonal outbreak with both methods used (spa type t002). The clonal outbreak was concentrated in 8 hospital departments and 2 primary care centres, all located in the city of Linkoping. All isolates were negative for the PVL gene. In conclusion, this study demonstrates an ongoing clonal outbreak of PVL-negative ECT-resistant MSSA. This stresses the need to continuously maintain basic hygiene rules, since nosocomial transmission of pathogens is not limited to known resistant bacteria such as MRSA.
PubMed ID
19294581 View in PubMed
Less detail

Genetic relatedness of Enterococcus faecalis isolates with high-level gentamicin resistance from patients with bacteraemia in the south east of Sweden 1994-2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178863
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2004;36(6-7):405-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Baharak Saeedi
Anita Hällgren
Barbro Isaksson
Jon Jonasson
Lennart E Nilsson
Håkan Hanberger
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Microbiology, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Hospital, SE-581 85 Linköping, Sweden. baharak.saeedi@lio.se
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2004;36(6-7):405-9
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Bacteremia - epidemiology - microbiology
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Drug Resistance, Bacterial - genetics
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Enterococcus faecalis - classification - drug effects - genetics
Enterococcus faecium - classification - drug effects - genetics
Gentamicins - pharmacology
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Prevalence
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
High-level gentamicin resistant (HLGR) enterococci (Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium) have become a substantial nosocomial problem in many countries. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of HLGR enterococci and their genetic relatedness in blood culture isolates from patients with bacteraemia admitted to the 3 hospitals in Ostergötland, a county in the south east of Sweden, during 1994-2001. 36 of 250 E. faecalis (14%,) and 4 of 106 E. faecium isolates (4%) were shown by PCR to carry the aac(6')-Ie-aph(2")-Ia aminoglycoside modifying gene and these isolates were also classified as HLGR enterococci by the gentamicin antibiotic disk diffusion method. A majority of HLGR E. faecalis isolates (83%) belonged to the same cluster of genetically related isolates, according to the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns, whereas all 4 HLGR E. faecium isolates had unique PFGE patterns. In conclusion, our study showed that in contrast to studies from many other countries, the presence of HLGR enterococci was more common in E. faecalis than in E. faecium and appeared the first time in 1996 and 1999, respectively. Bacteraemia with HLGR enterococci in Ostergötland was mainly due to the spread of a cluster of related E. faecalis strains.
PubMed ID
15307558 View in PubMed
Less detail

High antibiotic susceptibility among bacterial pathogens in Swedish ICUs. Report from a nation-wide surveillance program using TA90 as a novel index of susceptibility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9521
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2004;36(1):24-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Håkan Hanberger
Marcus Erlandsson
Lars G Burman
Otto Cars
Hans Gill
Sune Lindgren
Lennart E Nilsson
Barbro Olsson-Liljequist
Sten Walther
Author Affiliation
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoping, Sweden. Hakan.Hanberger@imk.liu.se
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2004;36(1):24-30
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Cross Infection - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial
Female
Gram-Negative Bacteria - drug effects - isolation & purification
Gram-Positive Bacteria - drug effects - isolation & purification
Humans
Incidence
Intensive Care Units
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Probability
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Local infection control measures, antibiotic consumption and patient demographics from 1999-2000 together with bacteriological analyses were investigated in 29 ICUs participating in the ICU-STRAMA programme. The median antibiotic consumption per ICU was 1147 (range 605-2143) daily doses per 1000 occupied bed d (DDD1000). Antibiotics to which > 90% of isolates of an organism were susceptible were defined as treatment alternatives (TA90). The mean number of TA90 was low (1-2 per organism) for Enterococcus faecium (vancomycin:VAN), coagulase negative staphylococci (VAN), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ceftazidime:CTZ, netilmicin: NET) and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (CTZ, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole: TSU), but higher (3-7) for Acinetobacter spp. (imipenem:IMI, NET, TSU), Enterococcus faecalis (ampicillin:AMP, IMI, VAN), Serratia spp. (ciprofloxacin:CIP, IMI, NET), Enterobacter spp. (CIP, IMI, NET, TSU), E. coli (cefuroxime:CXM, cefotaxime/eftazidime:CTX/CTZ, CIP, IMI, NET, piperacillin-tazobactam:PTZ, TSU), Klebsiella spp. (CTX/CTZ CIP, IMI, NET, PTZ, TSU) and Staphylococcus aureus (clindamycin, fusidic acid, NET, oxacillin, rifampicin, VAN). Of S. aureus isolates 2% were MRSA. Facilities for alcohol hand disinfection at each bed were available in 96% of the ICUs. The numbers of TA90 available were apparently higher than in ICUs in southern Europe and the US, despite a relatively high antibiotic consumption. This may be due to a moderate ecological impact of the used agents and the infection control routines in Swedish ICUs.
PubMed ID
15000555 View in PubMed
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High frequency of co-resistance in CTX-M-producing Escherichia coli to non-beta-lactam antibiotics, with the exceptions of amikacin, nitrofurantoin, colistin, tigecycline, and fosfomycin, in a county of Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119319
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2013 Apr;45(4):271-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Åse Östholm Balkhed
Maria Tärnberg
Hans-Jürg Monstein
Anita Hällgren
Håkan Hanberger
Lennart E Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Clinical Microbiology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2013 Apr;45(4):271-8
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Escherichia coli - drug effects - enzymology - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden - epidemiology
beta-Lactamases - biosynthesis
Abstract
The objective of this study was to investigate the in vitro activity of different antibiotics against CTX-M-producing Escherichia coli in a county of Sweden, and to determine the occurrence of multi-resistance and plasmid- mediated quinolone resistance among these isolates.
A total of 198 isolates of E. coli with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) phenotype and mainly CTX-M genotype were studied. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for amikacin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, colistin, fosfomycin, gentamicin, nalidixic acid, nitrofurantoin, tigecycline, tobramycin, trimethoprim, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole were determined with the Etest. Susceptibility was defined according to the breakpoints of the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST). MIC50 and MIC90 values were calculated.
Ninety-five percent or more of the isolates were susceptible to amikacin, nitrofurantoin, colistin, tigecycline, and fosfomycin. CTX-M group 9 was more susceptible than CTX-M group 1 to ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, and tobramycin. Sixty-eight percent of the isolates were multi-resistant, and the most common multi-resistance pattern was ESBL phenotype with decreased susceptibility to trimethoprim, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, and tobramycin. Only 1 isolate carried a qnrS1 gene, but 37% carried aac(6')-Ib-cr.
A high frequency of co-resistance between ESBL-producing E. coli and non-beta-lactam antibiotics was seen. On the other hand, very high susceptibility was seen for amikacin, nitrofurantoin, colistin, tigecycline, and fosfomycin. These data support the replacement of gentamicin and tobramycin, normally used in Sweden, with amikacin, for severe infections.
PubMed ID
23113731 View in PubMed
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Molecular detection of aggregation substance, enterococcal surface protein, and cytolysin genes and in vitro adhesion to urinary catheters of Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium of clinical origin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153982
Source
Int J Med Microbiol. 2009 Jun;299(5):323-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Anita Hällgren
Carina Claesson
Baharak Saeedi
Hans-Jürg Monstein
Håkan Hanberger
Lennart E Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, S-58185 Linköping, Sweden. aniha@imk.liu.se
Source
Int J Med Microbiol. 2009 Jun;299(5):323-32
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Adhesion
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Catheterization
Cluster analysis
DNA Fingerprinting
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Enterococcus faecalis - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - physiology
Enterococcus faecium - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - physiology
Environmental Microbiology
Genotype
Hospitals
Humans
Sweden
Virulence Factors - genetics
Abstract
It has been hypothesized that nosocomial enterococci might have virulence factors that enhance their ability to colonise hospitalised patients. The objectives of this study were to investigate the prevalence of genes encoding 3 virulence factors: aggregation substance (asa1), enterococcal surface protein (esp), and 5 genes within the cytolysin operon (cylA, cylB, cylM, cylL(L), cylL(S)) and cytolysin production in 115 enterococcal clinical isolates (21 Enterococcus faecium and 94 E. faecalis). Adhesion to siliconized latex urinary catheters in relation to presence of esp was analysed in a subset of isolates. The isolates were previously characterised by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). esp was the only virulence gene found in E. faecium. It was found in 71% of the 21 E. faecium isolates. asa1, esp, and the cyl operon were found in 79%, 73% and 13% respectively, of the 94 E. faecalis isolates. There was a complete agreement between presence of the cyl operon and phenotypic cytolysin production. Isolates belonging to a cluster of genetically related isolates carried esp and asa1 more often when compared to unique isolates. No difference was found with respect to cyl genes. E. faecalis isolates adhered with higher bacterial densities than E. faecium. E. faecalis isolates within the same PFGE cluster adhered with similar bacterial densities, but there was no association between adhesion and the presence of esp when isolates within the same cluster were compared. In conclusion, E. faecalis isolates with high-level gentamicin resistance (HLGR) belonging to clusters of genetically related isolates widely distributed in Swedish hospitals, were likely to carry both esp and asa1. Adhesion was not affected by esp.
PubMed ID
19042153 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prevalence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae and trends in antibiotic consumption in a county of Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142333
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2010 Dec;42(11-12):831-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Ase Ostholm-Balkhed
Maria Tärnberg
Maud Nilsson
Anita V Johansson
Håkan Hanberger
Hans-Jürg Monstein
Lennart E Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, University Hospital Linköping, Linköping, Sweden. ase.ostholm-balkhed@lio.se
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2010 Dec;42(11-12):831-8
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Enterobacteriaceae - drug effects - enzymology - isolation & purification
Enterobacteriaceae Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
beta-Lactamases - biosynthesis
beta-Lactams - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Abstract
In the last decade extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria have become an increasing problem. Our aims were to investigate the prevalence of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae and trends in antibiotic use in the county of Östergötland, Sweden. From 2002 through 2007 there were 224 ESBL-producing Escherichia coli and 23 Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates with an ESBL-phenotype identified among all Enterobacteriaceae isolated at the clinical laboratory. Trends in antibiotic consumption expressed as defined daily doses (DDD) per 1000 inhabitants and day (DID) were studied. The prevalence of ESBL-producing isolates among Enterobacteriaceae in our region is still low (
PubMed ID
20608768 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.