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Aboriginal maternity care resourcebook.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108542
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2013 Jul;35(7):598
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Len Kelly
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2013 Jul;35(7):598
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bibliography as Topic
Female
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Maternal health services
Pregnancy
PubMed ID
23876635 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bronchiolitis and pneumonia requiring hospitalization in young first nations children in Northern Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264115
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2014 Oct;33(10):1023-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Sarah McCuskee
Michael Kirlew
Len Kelly
Sonya Fewer
Thomas Kovesi
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2014 Oct;33(10):1023-6
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Bacteria - classification - isolation & purification
Bronchiolitis - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Pneumonia - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Viruses - classification - isolation & purification
Abstract
High rates of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI), including bronchiolitis and pneumonia, have been reported in Inuit infants living in arctic Canada. We examined rates of LRTI in First Nations Canadian infants living in the Sioux Lookout Zone, in Northern Ontario.
A retrospective review of hospital admissions for LRTI during a 5-year period, in patients
PubMed ID
24751861 View in PubMed
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Coping strategies, depression, and anxiety among Ontario family medicine residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167797
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2005 Feb;51:242-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Lynda Earle
Len Kelly
Author Affiliation
Family Medicine North Program, Thunder Bay, Ont.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2005 Feb;51:242-3
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology
Depression - epidemiology
Family Practice - education
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Social Support
Substance-Related Disorders
Abstract
To assess the current prevalence of depression and anxiety among Ontario family medicine residents, and to describe their coping strategies.
Surveys mailed to residents integrated DSM-IV diagnostic criteria and a previously validated Patient Health Questionnaire.
Ontario family medicine programs from June to August 2002.
Residents entering, advancing in, or graduating from residency programs: approximately 216 yearly for a total of 649 residents.
Types and frequency of coping skills used by residents; prevalence of depressive and anxiety disorders.
Response rate for residents entering programs was 46% and for graduating residents was 30% (37% response rate overall). Prevalence of depressive disorders was 20% (13% major depressive disorders, 7% other depressive syndromes)(odds ratio [OR] 3.4, confidence interval [CI] 2.7 to 7.5, P
Notes
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Cites: J Nerv Ment Dis. 1990 Mar;178(3):204-72152447
Cites: Med Teach. 1991;13(1):89-921865805
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1994 Jan;51(1):8-198279933
Cites: Fam Med. 1995 Nov-Dec;27(10):646-518582557
Cites: J Affect Disord. 1996 Apr 26;38(1):57-658735159
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Cites: Psychol Med. 2000 Jul;30(4):831-4011037091
Cites: J Med Educ. 1985 Jul;60(7):564-64009674
PubMed ID
16926935 View in PubMed
Less detail

Delivering away from home: the perinatal experiences of First Nations women in northwestern Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130925
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2011;16(4):126-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Terry O'Driscoll
Len Kelly
Lauren Payne
Natalie St Pierre-Hansen
Helen Cromarty
Bryanne Minty
Barb Linkewich
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Sciences, Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Sioux Lookout, Ont.
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2011;16(4):126-30
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Delivery, Obstetric
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Indians, North American
Ontario - ethnology
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women - psychology
Qualitative Research
Rural Population
Travel
Abstract
Our objective was to understand the perinatal knowledge and experiences of First Nations women from northwestern Ontario who travel away from their remote communities to give birth.
A systematic review of MEDLINE, HealthSTAR, HAPI, Embase, AMED, PsycINFO and CINAHL was undertaken using Medical Subject Headings and keywords focusing on Canadian Aboriginal (First Nations, Metis and Inuit) prenatal education and care, and maternal health literacy. This qualitative study using semistructured interviews was conducted in a rural hospital and prenatal clinic that serves First Nations women. Thirteen women from remote communities who had travelled to Sioux Lookout, Ont., to give birth participated in the study.
We identified 5 other qualitative studies that explored the birthing experiences of Aboriginal women. The studies documented a negative experience for women who travelled to access intrapartum maternity care. While in Sioux Lookout to give birth, our participants also experienced loneliness and missed their families. They were open to the idea of a culturally appropriate doula program and visits in hospital by First Nations elders, but they were less interested in access to tele-visitation with family members back in their communities. We found that our participants received most of their prenatal information from family members.
First Nations women who travel away from home to give birth often travel great cultural and geographic distances. Hospital-based maternity care programs for these women need to achieve a balance of clinical and cultural safety. Programs should be developed to lessen some of the negative consequences these women experience.
PubMed ID
21955339 View in PubMed
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Epidural steroid injections for low back pain in rural practice: a 5-year retrospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120314
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2012;17(4):127-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Azad Mashari
Robert Minty
Lauren Minty
Wilma M Hopman
Len Kelly
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesia, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2012;17(4):127-34
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - therapeutic use
Adult
Aged
Female
Humans
Injections, Epidural - methods
Intervertebral Disc Degeneration - drug therapy
Intervertebral Disc Displacement - drug therapy
Low Back Pain - drug therapy
Lumbar Vertebrae
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Patient Selection
Retrospective Studies
Rural Population
Spinal Stenosis - drug therapy
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Epidural steroid injections (ESIs) are a safe and accessible therapy for chronic low back pain, one of the most common and challenging chronic conditions seen in primary care. However, the indications for and effectiveness of ESI remain controversial. In rural settings with limited public transportation infrastructure, such a mobility-limiting condition can have even more negative effects on quality of life and function. Furthermore, diagnostic and specialist services are often limited. A paucity of safe, effective and accessible treatments leads to heavy reliance on oral analgesics, especially opioids, which have well-known complications.
We reviewed the use of ESI for the 2 most common types of chronic low back pain in those with neurologic symptoms: lumbar disc herniation (LDH) and lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). We did a retrospective chart review of all patients who underwent ESI between Jan. 1, 2005, and Feb. 25, 2010, at our rural hospital in northwestern Ontario.
During the study period, 123 ESIs were administered to 65 patients. After the first injection, 40 patients (62%) reported improvement, 10 (15%) reported worsening or no change, and 15 (23%) had no follow-up documented.
Some patients with neurologic compromise from LDH or LSS have improvement in symptoms after ESI. A prospective study is underway to more rigorously assess the effectiveness of this treatment.
PubMed ID
23017344 View in PubMed
Less detail

First Nations women's knowledge of menopause: experiences and perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140810
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2010 Sep;56(9):e331-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Sharen Madden
Natalie St Pierre-Hansen
Len Kelly
Helen Cromarty
Barbara Linkewich
Lauren Payne
Author Affiliation
Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Box 489, Sioux Lookout, ON P8T 1A8. smadden@slmhc.on.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2010 Sep;56(9):e331-7
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anecdotes as Topic
Cultural Characteristics
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Indians, North American
Menopause - ethnology - physiology - psychology
Ontario - ethnology
Patient Education as Topic - standards
Quality of Life
Terminology as Topic
Abstract
To understand and describe the menopause experiences and perspectives of First Nations women residing in northwestern Ontario.
Phenomenologic approach using in-depth qualitative interviews.
Sioux Lookout, Ont, and 4 surrounding First Nations communities.
Eighteen perimenopausal and postmenopausal First Nations women, recruited by convenience and snowball sampling techniques.
Semistructured interviews were audiotaped and transcribed. Themes emerged through a crystallization and immersion analytical approach. Triangulation of methods was used to ensure reliability of findings.
This study confirms the hypothesis that menopause is generally not discussed by First Nations women, particularly with their health care providers. The generational knowledge gained by the women in this study suggests that a variety of experiences and symptoms typical of menopause from a medical perspective might not be conceptually linked to menopause by First Nations women. The interview process and initial consultation with translators revealed that there is no uniform word in Ojibway or Oji-Cree for menopause. A common phrase is "that time when periods stop," which can be used by caregivers as a starting point for discussion. Participants' interest in the topic and their desire for more information might imply that they would welcome the topic being raised by health care providers.
This study speaks to the importance of understanding the different influences on a woman's menopause experience. Patient communication regarding menopause might be enhanced by providing women with an opportunity or option to discuss the topic with their health care providers. Caregivers should also be cautious of attaching preconceived ideas to the meaning and importance of the menopause experience.
Notes
Cites: J Womens Health Gend Based Med. 2000;9 Suppl 2:S27-3810714743
Cites: J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2002 Dec;24(12):938-4012464991
Cites: Coll Antropol. 2003 Jun;27(1):57-6612974133
Cites: Cult Med Psychiatry. 1986 Mar;10(1):7-213698650
Cites: Health Care Women Int. 1991 Jan-Mar;12(1):41-501989960
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1993 Jun;168(6 Pt 1):1839-43; discussion 1843-58317530
Cites: Menopause. 2007 Jul-Aug;14(4):725-3317279061
Cites: Obstet Gynecol Surv. 2006 Mar;61(3):187-9316490118
Cites: Menopause. 2007 Jul-Aug;14(4):688-9617290159
Cites: Menopause. 2007 Jul-Aug;14(4):708-1617327811
Cites: Menopause. 2007 Jul-Aug;14(4):697-70717438514
Cites: Menopause. 2007 Jul-Aug;14(4):788-9717507832
Cites: Menopause. 2007 Jul-Aug;14(4):760-817525696
Cites: Maturitas. 1996 Mar;23(2):169-808735355
PubMed ID
20841572 View in PubMed
Less detail

Gallbladder disease in northwestern Ontario: the case for Canada's first rural ERCP program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135709
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2011;16(2):55-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Eric Touzin
Chris Decker
Len Kelly
Bryanne Minty
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Sciences, Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Sioux Lookout, Ont., Canada. etouzin@slmhc.on.ca
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2011;16(2):55-60
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cholangiopancreatography, Endoscopic Retrograde - statistics & numerical data
Cholecystectomy, Laparoscopic - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gallbladder Diseases - epidemiology - surgery
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Rural health services - organization & administration
Time Factors
Transportation of Patients - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The rate of cholecystectomy in northwestern Ontario is double the provincial rate. This paper explores the demographics of cholecystectomy and the role for rural endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) services in the central part of this region.
We conducted a literature review of ERCP services and cholecystectomy rates, as well as a hospital chart review of patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomies in Sioux Lookout, Ont. We contacted surgeons and gastroenterologists from referral centres in Winnipeg, Man., and Thunder Bay, Ont., for the charts of patients from our catchment area who underwent ERCP.
Patients in our region who require urgent and emergent surgery are flown by fixed-wing aircraft to referral centres in Winnipeg and Thunder Bay for assessment and surgery. The rate of ERCP in our population is 150 in 100 000, which is threefold that of other populations, and our cholecystectomy rate is the highest in Ontario.
Substantial savings in transportation expenses would offset the development costs of an ERCP program and provide more integrated patient care. The volume of patients would support maintenance of competency. This rural area with a high rate of gallbladder disease would benefit from the development of a rural ERCP program.
PubMed ID
21453605 View in PubMed
Less detail

Invasive disease caused by Haemophilus influenzae type a in Northern Ontario First Nations communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138694
Source
J Med Microbiol. 2011 Mar;60(Pt 3):384-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Len Kelly
Raymond S W Tsang
Alanna Morgan
Frances B Jamieson
Marina Ulanova
Author Affiliation
Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Thunder Bay and Sioux Lookout, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Med Microbiol. 2011 Mar;60(Pt 3):384-90
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Bacteremia - epidemiology - microbiology
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Blood - microbiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Haemophilus Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Haemophilus influenzae - classification - isolation & purification
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Serotyping
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Seven epidemiologically unrelated cases of invasive Haemophilus influenzae type a (Hia) disease were identified in First Nations communities of Northwestern Ontario, Canada, in 2004-2008. In all cases, Hia was isolated from blood. The clinical presentation in most of the cases was moderately severe and all patients responded to antibiotic therapy. Laboratory analysis of Hia isolates from Northwestern Ontario indicated striking similarities in their phenotypic and genotypic characteristics. The findings are discussed in the context of current epidemiology of invasive Hia disease. Our data along with some published studies by others suggest an increased susceptibility to this infection among North American indigenous populations.
PubMed ID
21148281 View in PubMed
Less detail

Invasive Haemophilus influenzae disease caused by non-type b strains in Northwestern Ontario, Canada, 2002-2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148499
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2009 Oct 15;49(8):1240-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2009
Author
Veronica M Brown
Sharen Madden
Len Kelly
Frances B Jamieson
Raymond S W Tsang
Marina Ulanova
Author Affiliation
Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Thunder Bay and Sioux Lookout, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2009 Oct 15;49(8):1240-3
Date
Oct-15-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Haemophilus Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Haemophilus Vaccines - immunology
Haemophilus influenzae - classification - isolation & purification
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Prevalence
Serotyping
Young Adult
Abstract
A high incidence of invasive non-type b Haemophilus influenzae disease was found in Northwestern Ontario, Canada; H. influenzae type a was the most prevalent serotype (42%). Clinical and demographic analyses indicate that aboriginal children aged
PubMed ID
19761408 View in PubMed
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21 records – page 1 of 3.