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Haplotype of the Interleukin 17A gene is associated with osteitis after Bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301654
Source
Sci Rep. 2017 09 15; 7(1):11691
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-15-2017
Author
Matti Korppi
Johanna Teräsjärvi
Milla Liehu-Martiskainen
Eero Lauhkonen
Juho Vuononvirta
Kirsi Nuolivirta
Liisa Kröger
Laura Pöyhönen
Minna K Karjalainen
Qiushui He
Author Affiliation
Center for Child Health Research, University of Tampere and University Hospital, Tampere, Finland. matti.korppi@staff.uta.fi.
Source
Sci Rep. 2017 09 15; 7(1):11691
Date
09-15-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
BCG Vaccine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Finland
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Haplotypes
Humans
Interleukin-17 - genetics
Mycobacterium bovis - immunology
Osteitis - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Vaccination
Abstract
Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) osteitis was more common in Finland than elsewhere at the time when universal BCG vaccinations were given to Finnish newborns. There is evidence that IL-17 plays a role in the defense against tuberculosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the associations of IL17A rs4711998, IL17A rs8193036 and IL17A rs2275913 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with the risk of BCG osteitis after newborn vaccination. IL17A rs4711998, rs8193036 and rs2275913 SNPs were determined in 131 adults had presented with BCG osteitis after newborn BCG vaccination. We analyzed, using the HaploView and PLINK programs, whether allele or haplotype frequencies of these SNPs differ between the former BCG osteitis patients and Finnish population controls. Of the three IL17A SNPs studied, rs4711998 associated nominally with BCG osteitis; minor allele frequency was 0.215 in 130 BCG osteitis cases and 0.298 in 99 controls (p?=?0.034). Frequency of the second common haplotype (GTA) differed significantly between BCG osteitis cases and controls (0.296 vs. 0.184, p?=?0.040 after multi-testing correction). The GTA haplotype of the IL17A SNPs rs4711998, rs8193036 and rs2275913 was associated with osteitis after BCG vaccination.
PubMed ID
28916742 View in PubMed
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Interferon-gamma-dependent Immunity in Bacillus Calmette-Guérin Vaccine Osteitis Survivors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281961
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2016 06;35(6):690-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
06-2016
Author
Laura Pöyhönen
Liisa Kröger
Heini Huhtala
Johanna Mäkinen
Jussi Mertsola
Ruben Martinez-Barricarte
Jean-Laurent Casanova
Jacinta Bustamante
Qiushui He
Matti Korppi
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2016 06;35(6):690-4
Date
06-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
BCG Vaccine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Female
Finland
Humans
Immunologic Factors - genetics
Interferon-gamma - secretion
Interleukin-12 - secretion
Leukocytes, Mononuclear - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Mycobacterium bovis - immunology
Osteitis - chemically induced - immunology
Survivors
Young Adult
Abstract
Inborn errors of interferon-gamma (IFN-?)-mediated immunity underlie disseminated disease caused by Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) live vaccines. We hypothesized that some patients with osteitis after BCG vaccination may have an impaired IFN-? immunity. Our aim was to investigate interleukin (IL)-12 and IFN-? ex vivo production stimulated with BCG and BCG + IFN-? or BCG + IL-12, respectively, in BCG osteitis survivors.
Fresh blood samples were collected from 132 former BCG osteitis Finnish patients now aged 21-49 years, and IL-12 and IFN-? were measured in cell cultures with and without stimulation with BCG and with BCG + IFN-? or BCG + IL-12, respectively. As a pilot study, known disease-causing genes controlling IFN-? immunity (IFNGR1, IFNGR2, STAT1, IL12B, IL12RB1, ISG15, IRF8, NEMO and CYBB) were investigated in 20 selected patients by whole exome sequencing.
By the limit of
Notes
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PubMed ID
26954602 View in PubMed
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