Skip header and navigation

Refine By

29 records – page 1 of 3.

Analysing the large decline in coronary heart disease mortality in the Icelandic population aged 25-74 between the years 1981 and 2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139092
Source
PLoS One. 2010;5(11):e13957
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Thor Aspelund
Vilmundur Gudnason
Bergrun Tinna Magnusdottir
Karl Andersen
Gunnar Sigurdsson
Bolli Thorsson
Laufey Steingrimsdottir
Julia Critchley
Kathleen Bennett
Martin O'Flaherty
Simon Capewell
Author Affiliation
Icelandic Heart Association, Kopavogur, Iceland.
Source
PLoS One. 2010;5(11):e13957
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Coronary Disease - mortality - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Mortality - trends
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - prevention & control
Abstract
Coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality rates have been decreasing in Iceland since the 1980s. We examined how much of the decrease between 1981 and 2006 could be attributed to medical and surgical treatments and how much to changes in cardiovascular risk factors.
The previously validated IMPACT CHD mortality model was applied to the Icelandic population. The data sources were official statistics, national quality registers, published trials and meta-analyses, clinical audits and a series of national population surveys.
Between 1981 and 2006, CHD mortality rates in Iceland decreased by 80% in men and women aged 25 to 74 years, which resulted in 295 fewer deaths in 2006 than if the 1981 rates had persisted. Incidence of myocardial infarction (MI) decreased by 66% and resulted in some 500 fewer incident MI cases per year, which is a major determinant of possible deaths from MI. Based on the IMPACT model approximately 73% (lower and upper bound estimates: 54%-93%) of the mortality decrease was attributable to risk factor reductions: cholesterol 32%; smoking 22%; systolic blood pressure 22%, and physical inactivity 5% with adverse trends for diabetes (-5%), and obesity (-4%). Approximately 25% (lower and upper bound estimates: 8%-40%) of the mortality decrease was attributable to treatments in individuals: secondary prevention 8%; heart failure treatments 6%; acute coronary syndrome treatments 5%; revascularisation 3%; hypertension treatments 2%, and statins 0.5%.
Almost three quarters of the large CHD mortality decrease in Iceland between 1981 and 2006 was attributable to reductions in major cardiovascular risk factors in the population. These findings emphasize the value of a comprehensive prevention strategy that promotes tobacco control and a healthier diet to reduce incidence of MI and highlights the potential importance of effective, evidence based medical treatments.
Notes
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2005 Jan;95(1):103-815623868
Cites: Laeknabladid. 2009 Apr;95(4):259-6619420407
Cites: BMJ. 2005 Sep 17;331(7517):61416107431
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2005 Oct 15;162(8):764-7316150890
Cites: Heart. 2006 Apr;92(4):521-316537767
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2006 Apr;60(4):322-716537349
Cites: Circulation. 2000 Sep 26;102(13):1511-611004141
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2002 Aug 12-26;162(15):1682-812153370
Cites: JAMA. 2002 Nov 27;288(20):2569-7812444864
Cites: Lancet. 2002 Dec 14;360(9349):1903-1312493255
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2003 Apr;57(4):243-712646537
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Jul 2;290(1):86-9712837716
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2003 Jun;56(6):583-9012873654
Cites: Circulation. 2004 Mar 9;109(9):1101-714993137
Cites: Circulation. 2004 Sep 7;110(10):1236-4415337690
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1986 Jan 4;292(6512):33-52867803
Cites: BMJ. 1991 Jun 8;302(6789):1371-52059715
Cites: BMJ. 1994 Jul 2;309(6946):23-78044063
Cites: Health Econ. 1994 Mar-Apr;3(2):95-1048044216
Cites: BMJ. 1995 Sep 23;311(7008):793-67580444
Cites: J Cardiovasc Risk. 1996 Jun;3(3):271-68863098
Cites: JAMA. 1997 Feb 19;277(7):535-429032159
Cites: Heart. 1999 Apr;81(4):380-610092564
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Apr 12;356(15):1503-1617387127
Cites: QJM. 2007 May;100(5):277-8917449875
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Jun 7;356(23):2388-9817554120
Cites: Lancet. 2007 Dec 1;370(9602):1829-3918061058
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2008 Aug 14;359(7):677-8718703470
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2009 May;30(9):1046-5619141562
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2005 Jul;58(7):733-4015939226
PubMed ID
21103050 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing validity of a short food frequency questionnaire on present dietary intake of elderly Icelanders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126210
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Tinna Eysteinsdottir
Inga Thorsdottir
Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir
Laufey Steingrimsdottir
Author Affiliation
Unit for Nutrition Research, University of Iceland and Landspitali National-University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. tinnaey@landspitali.is
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:12
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Animals
Cod Liver Oil
Coffee
Dairy Products
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Iceland
Interviews as Topic
Male
Meat
Nutrition Assessment
Questionnaires - standards
Sex Factors
Tea
Vegetables
Abstract
Few studies exist on the validity of food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) administered to elderly people. The aim of this study was to assess the validity of a short FFQ on present dietary intake, developed specially for the AGES-Reykjavik Study, which includes 5,764 elderly individuals. Assessing the validity of FFQs is essential before they are used in studies on diet-related disease risk and health outcomes.
128 healthy elderly participants (74 y ± 5.7; 58.6% female) answered the AGES-FFQ, and subsequently filled out a 3-day weighed food record. Validity of the AGES-FFQ was assessed by comparing its answers to the dietary data obtained from the weighed food records, using Spearman's rank correlation, Chi-Square/Kendall's tau, and a Jonckheere-Terpstra test for trend.
For men a correlation = 0.4 was found for potatoes, fresh fruits, oatmeal/muesli, cakes/cookies, candy, dairy products, milk, pure fruit juice, cod liver oil, coffee, tea and sugar in coffee/tea (r = 0.40-0.71). A lower, but acceptable, correlation was also found for raw vegetables (r = 0.33). The highest correlation for women was found for consumption of rye bread, oatmeal/muesli, raw vegetables, candy, dairy products, milk, pure fruit juice, cod liver oil, coffee and tea (r = 0.40-0.61). An acceptable correlation was also found for fish topping/salad, fresh fruit, blood/liver sausage, whole-wheat bread, and sugar in coffee/tea (r = 0.28-0.37). Questions on meat/fish meals, cooked vegetables and soft drinks did not show a significant correlation to the reference method. Pearson Chi-Square and Kendall's tau showed similar results, as did the Jonckheere-Terpstra trend test.
A majority of the questions in the AGES-FFQ had an acceptable correlation and may be used to rank individuals according to their level of intake of several important foods/food groups. The AGES-FFQ on present diet may therefore be used to study the relationship between consumption of several specific foods/food groups and various health-related endpoints gathered in the AGES-Reykjavik Study.
Notes
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2001 Apr;4(2):249-5411299098
Cites: Epidemiology. 2000 Jul;11(4):440-510874552
Cites: J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2001 Oct;56 Spec No 2:54-6411730238
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2009 Feb;63 Suppl 1:S69-7419190649
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2009 Dec;102 Suppl 1:S118-4920100365
Cites: Biogerontology. 2010 Oct;11(5):597-60220495957
Cites: Nutr J. 2010;9:3620840739
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 May;56 Suppl 2:S25-3212082515
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2002 Aug;31(4):847-5412177033
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2002 Aug;5(4):567-8712186666
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2002 Sep;12(3):208-1312232961
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2003 May;6(3):313-2112740081
Cites: Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2004 Jan-Feb;38(1):51-6014599704
Cites: J Psychiatr Res. 1975 Nov;12(3):189-981202204
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1989 Nov;50(5 Suppl):1139-44; discussion 1231-52683722
Cites: Epidemiology. 1993 Sep;4(5):455-638399695
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1994 Jan;59(1 Suppl):221S-223S8279429
Cites: J Nutr. 1994 Nov;124(11 Suppl):2245S-2317S7965210
Cites: Med J Aust. 1995 Oct 2;163(7):376-817565265
Cites: Proc Nutr Soc. 1995 Nov;54(3):631-438643701
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2006 Mar;60(3):408-1516306927
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2006 Oct;19(5):321-3016961678
Cites: Am J Med. 2006 Dec;119(12):1019-2617145241
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2007 May 1;165(9):1076-8717351290
Cites: J Nutr Health Aging. 2008 Dec;12(10):735-4119043649
Cites: BMJ. 2011;342:d173221447571
Cites: J Nutr Health Aging. 2011 Dec;15(10):809-1422159766
Cites: J Nutr Health Aging. 2012 Jan;16(1):62-622238003
Cites: J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2001 Oct;56 Spec No 2:47-5311730237
PubMed ID
22413931 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Attitudes to food and eating in an Icelandic cohort].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279965
Source
Laeknabladid. 2016 Jul;102(7-8):332-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
Olof Drofn Sigurbjornsdottir
Johanna Eyrun Torfadottir
Anna Sigridur Olafsdottir
Laufey Steingrimsdottir
Source
Laeknabladid. 2016 Jul;102(7-8):332-8
Date
Jul-2016
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Body mass index
Choice Behavior
Feeding Behavior
Female
Food
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Healthy Lifestyle
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Weight Gain
Young Adult
Abstract
Few studies exist on eating attitudes and well-being of adults in Iceland. In most Western societies great emphasis is placed on a lean and fit body, nevertheless the number of people gaining weigt keeps increasing. Such circumstances may cause discomfort related to food and food choice. The aim of this study was to examine attitudes towards food and eating among Icelandic adults.
We used data from the Icelandic national health survey of 5,861 adults, age 18-79, conducted in 2007. A numerical assessment tool for measuring eating attitude was established, based on answers to questions on eating attitude. We used binary regression models to estimate odds ratios (ORs) for unhealthy eating attitude according to different demographic factors.
The prevalence of unhealthy eating attitude according to the measurement tool used in the study was 17% among participants, 22% for women and 11% for men. Unhealthy eating attitude was most prevalent in the age-group 18-29 years (36% of women, 15% of men), among those dissatisfied with their body weight (35% of women, 22% of men) and among those defined as obese (38% of women, 23% of men).
Our data show that women are more prone to express unhealthy eating attitude compared to men. Those of younger age, with weight dissatisfaction and with high body mass index are positively associated with unhealthy eating attitude, irrespective of gender.
Diet, Dietary restraint, Public Health, Eating attitude, Body weight satisfaction. Correspondence: Laufey Steingrimsdottir, laufey@hi.is.
PubMed ID
27531852 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in total cholesterol levels in Western societies are not related to statin, but rather dietary factors: the example of the Icelandic population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118449
Source
Eur Heart J. 2013 Jun;34(24):1778-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013

Cod liver oil consumption at different periods of life and bone mineral density in old age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263650
Source
Br J Nutr. 2015 Jun 16;:1-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-16-2015
Author
Tinna Eysteinsdottir
Thorhallur I Halldorsson
Inga Thorsdottir
Gunnar Sigurdsson
Sigurdur Sigurdsson
Tamara Harris
Lenore J Launer
Vilmundur Gudnason
Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir
Laufey Steingrimsdottir
Source
Br J Nutr. 2015 Jun 16;:1-9
Date
Jun-16-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Cod liver oil is a traditional source of vitamin D in Iceland, and regular intake is recommended partly for the sake of bone health. However, the association between lifelong consumption of cod liver oil and bone mineral density (BMD) in old age is unclear. The present study attempted to assess the associations between intake of cod liver oil in adolescence, midlife, and old age, and hip BMD in old age, as well as associations between cod liver oil intake in old age and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration. Participants of the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study (age 66-96 years; n 4798), reported retrospectively cod liver oil intake during adolescence and midlife, as well as the one now in old age, using a validated FFQ. BMD of femoral neck and trochanteric region was measured by volumetric quantitative computed tomography, and serum 25(OH)D concentration was measured by means of a direct, competitive chemiluminescence immunoassay. Associations were assessed using linear regression models. No significant association was seen between retrospective cod liver oil intake and hip BMD in old age. Current intake of aged men was also not associated with hip BMD, while aged women with daily intakes had z-scores on average 0·1 higher, compared with those with an intake of
PubMed ID
26079168 View in PubMed
Less detail

Consumption of fish products across the lifespan and prostate cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114499
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(4):e59799
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Johanna E Torfadottir
Unnur A Valdimarsdottir
Lorelei A Mucci
Julie L Kasperzyk
Katja Fall
Laufey Tryggvadottir
Thor Aspelund
Orn Olafsson
Tamara B Harris
Eirikur Jonsson
Hrafn Tulinius
Vilmundur Gudnason
Hans-Olov Adami
Meir Stampfer
Laufey Steingrimsdottir
Author Affiliation
Centre of Public Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. jet@hi.is
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(4):e59799
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - drug effects - physiology
Feeding Behavior - drug effects - physiology
Fish Oils - pharmacology
Fish Products
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Prostatic Neoplasms - pathology
Risk factors
Abstract
To examine whether fish and fish oil consumption across the lifespan is associated with a lower risk of prostate cancer.
The study was nested among 2268 men aged 67-96 years in the AGES-Reykjavik cohort study. In 2002 to 2006, dietary habits were assessed, for early life, midlife and later life using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Participants were followed for prostate cancer diagnosis and mortality through 2009 via linkage to nationwide cancer- and mortality registers. Adjusting for potential confounders, we used regression models to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and hazard ratios (HRs) for prostate cancer according to fish and fish oil consumption.
Among the 2268 men, we ascertained 214 prevalent and 133 incident prostate cancer cases, of which 63 had advanced disease. High fish consumption in early- and midlife was not associated with overall or advanced prostate cancer. High intake of salted or smoked fish was associated with a 2-fold increased risk of advanced prostate cancer both in early life (95% CI: 1.08, 3.62) and in later life (95% CI: 1.04, 5.00). Men consuming fish oil in later life had a lower risk of advanced prostate cancer [HR (95%CI): 0.43 (0.19, 0.95)], no association was found for early life or midlife consumption.
Salted or smoked fish may increase risk of advanced prostate cancer, whereas fish oil consumption may be protective against progression of prostate cancer in elderly men. In a setting with very high fish consumption, no association was found between overall fish consumption in early or midlife and prostate cancer risk.
Notes
Cites: Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2008 Feb;48(2):119-3618274968
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2007 Dec 19;99(24):1881-718073376
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2008 Jul;32(7):1105-1218490931
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Nov;88(5):1297-30318996866
Cites: Mol Nutr Food Res. 2009 Feb;53(2):191-20019101948
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2009 May;12(5):609-1318664313
Cites: J Nutrigenet Nutrigenomics. 2009;2(3):149-5819776642
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2010 Sep;64(9):958-6420551966
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Nov;92(5):1223-3320844069
Cites: Nutr J. 2010;9:5021044319
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2011 Mar;22(3):319-4021203822
Cites: PLoS One. 2011;6(4):e1862521494639
Cites: J Nutr Health Aging. 2011 Dec;15(10):809-1422159766
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2012 Jan 15;175(2):144-5322190107
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2012 Mar;23(3):405-2022207320
Cites: Br J Cancer. 1999 Dec;81(7):1238-4210584888
Cites: Nutr Cancer. 2008;60(2):222-618444154
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2012 May 2;104(9):690-922499501
Cites: Clin Biochem. 1999 Aug;32(6):405-910667474
Cites: Lancet. 2001 Jun 2;357(9270):1764-611403817
Cites: Eur J Cancer Prev. 2002 Jun;11 Suppl 1:S1-9612442806
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2003 Jan;12(1):64-712540506
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2003 Nov 1;158(9):844-5114585762
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2004 May 4;90(9):1792-515208621
Cites: Cancer. 1989 Aug 1;64(3):598-6042743254
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2012 Jun;23(6):941-5022527172
Cites: Nutr J. 2012;11:1222413931
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2013 Feb;16(2):325-922607718
Cites: Urol Oncol. 2013 Oct;31(7):951-6522459691
Cites: Free Radic Biol Med. 1992;12(1):35-411537569
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1995 Apr-May;4(3):187-927606192
Cites: Neoplasma. 1996;43(1):61-38843963
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1997 Apr;65(4 Suppl):1153S-1158S9094913
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2004 Nov;15(9):911-2015577293
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2006 Dec;30 Suppl 4:S11-717133230
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2007 Jan 15;120(2):398-40517066444
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2007 May 1;165(9):1076-8717351290
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2007 Jul;16(7):1364-7017585059
Comment In: J Urol. 2014 Jan;191(1):74-524331480
PubMed ID
23613715 View in PubMed
Less detail

Depression and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D in older adults living at northern latitudes - AGES-Reykjavik Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268648
Source
J Nutr Sci. 2015;4:e37
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Cindy M Imai
Thorhallur I Halldorsson
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Mary F Cotch
Laufey Steingrimsdottir
Inga Thorsdottir
Lenore J Launer
Tamara Harris
Vilmundur Gudnason
Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir
Source
J Nutr Sci. 2015;4:e37
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Low vitamin D status may be associated with depression. Few studies have examined vitamin D and depression in older adults living at northern latitudes. The present study cross-sectionally investigated serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) status and depression among 5006 community-dwelling older persons (66-96 years) living in Iceland (latitudes 64-66°N). Depressive symptoms were measured by the fifteen-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15). Current major depressive disorder was assessed according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV) criteria. Serum 25(OH)D was analysed using chemiluminescence immunoassay and categorised into three groups: deficient (
PubMed ID
26688723 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Dietary habits and their association with blood pressure among elderly Icelandic people].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120065
Source
Laeknabladid. 2012 Oct;98(10):515-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Atli Arnarson
Olof Gudny Geirsdottir
Alfons Ramel
Palmi V Jonsson
Laufey Steingrimsdottir
Inga Thorsdottir
Author Affiliation
Unit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali National University Hospital. atliarnar@gmail.is
Source
Laeknabladid. 2012 Oct;98(10):515-20
Date
Oct-2012
Language
Icelandic
Geographic Location
Iceland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Blood pressure
Cod Liver Oil - administration & dosage
Dietary Supplements
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Iceland - epidemiology
Iodine - deficiency
Iron - deficiency
Male
Nutrition Policy
Vitamin B 6 Deficiency - epidemiology
Vitamin D Deficiency - epidemiology
Abstract
Prevalence of hypertension, which is the most common risk factor for cardiovascular disease in elderly people, increases with age. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between diet and blood pressure in elderly Icelanders, with focus on cod liver oil, and to compare their diet to dietary guidelines.
Diet was assessed using three-day weighed food records and blood pressure was measured after a 12-hour-fast in 236, 65-91 years old, Icelanders living in the capital area of Iceland. 99 men (42%) and 137 women (58%) participated in the study.
According to Nordic nutrition recommendations, intake of nutrients was above lower intake levels among the majority of participants. However, 19% were under this level for vitamin-D, 13% for iodine, 17% of men for vitamin-B6, and 26% and 12% of men and women, respectively, for iron. Systolic blood pressure was inversely associated with cod liver oil intake, even when adjusted for age, body mass index, gender, and antihypertensive medications (P=0.01). Intake of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids correlated with blood pressure in a similar way. Other dietary factors were not associated with blood pressure.
The results indicate that intake of cod liver oil is associated with lower blood pressure among elderly people and may therefore have beneficial effects on health. A notable proportion of participants was at risk of vitamin D, vitamin B6, iodine, and iron deficiency.
Notes
Comment In: Laeknabladid. 2012 Oct;98(10):51123043062
PubMed ID
23043064 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dietary habits in adolescence and midlife and risk of breast cancer in older women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292038
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(5):e0198017
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
Alfheidur Haraldsdottir
Johanna E Torfadottir
Unnur A Valdimarsdottir
Hans-Olov Adami
Thor Aspelund
Laufey Tryggvadottir
Marianna Thordardottir
Bryndis E Birgisdottir
Tamara B Harris
Lenore J Launer
Vilmundur Gudnason
Laufey Steingrimsdottir
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(5):e0198017
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Recent studies indicate that lifestyle factors in early life affect breast cancer risk. We therefore explored the association of high consumption of meat, milk, and whole grain products in adolescence and midlife, on breast cancer risk. We used data from the population based AGES-Reykjavik cohort (2002-2006), where 3,326 women with a mean age of 77 years (SD 6.0) participated. For food items and principal component derived dietary patterns we used Cox proportional models to calculate multivariate hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). During a mean follow-up of 8.8 years, 97 women were diagnosed with breast cancer. For both adolescence and midlife, daily consumption of rye bread was positively associated with breast cancer (HR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1-2.6 and HR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1-2.9, respectively). In contrast, persistent high consumption of oatmeal was negatively associated with breast cancer (0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.9). No association was found for other food items or dietary patterns that included rye bread. High rye bread consumption in adolescence and midlife may increase risk of late-life breast cancer whilst persistent consumption of oatmeal may reduce the risk.
Notes
Cites: Proc Nutr Soc. 2003 Feb;62(1):193-9 PMID 12749346
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2007 May 1;165(9):1076-87 PMID 17351290
Cites: J Nutr Health Aging. 2011 Dec;15(10):809-14 PMID 22159766
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2012 Jan 15;175(2):144-53 PMID 22190107
Cites: Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2015 May;151(1):191-8 PMID 25893586
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 Aug;17(8):2146-51 PMID 18669582
Cites: Acta Oncol. 2012 Sep;51(7):880-9 PMID 22974093
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Jul;100 Suppl 1:386S-93S PMID 24847855
Cites: BMJ. 2014 Jun 10;348:g3437 PMID 24916719
Cites: Endocrinology. 1998 Oct;139(10):4252-63 PMID 9751507
Cites: Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2014 Jun;145(3):567-79 PMID 24820413
Cites: J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2007 Aug-Sep;106(1-5):24-30 PMID 17719770
Cites: PLoS One. 2013 Apr 17;8(4):e59799 PMID 23613715
Cites: Nutr J. 2013 May 16;12:62 PMID 23679924
Cites: Epidemiol Rev. 1992;14:177-96 PMID 1289112
Cites: Crit Rev Oncol Hematol. 2008 Apr;66(1):65-74 PMID 17949989
Cites: Crit Rev Clin Lab Sci. 2007;44(5-6):483-525 PMID 17943494
Cites: Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2011 May;127(1):23-31 PMID 21442197
Cites: Nutr Rev. 2004 May;62(5):177-203 PMID 15212319
Cites: Anticancer Agents Med Chem. 2013 Jun;13(5):709-19 PMID 23140353
Cites: J Breast Cancer. 2015 Dec;18(4):313-22 PMID 26770237
Cites: Food Nutr Res. 2010 Nov 10;54:null PMID 21311613
Cites: Int J Biol Macromol. 2015 Sep;80:23-8 PMID 26092171
Cites: Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2016 Sep;159(2):335-45 PMID 27510186
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Dec;86(6):1722-9 PMID 18065592
Cites: Anticancer Res. 2014 Dec;34(12):6861-75 PMID 25503112
Cites: Pediatrics. 2016 Mar;137(3):e20151226 PMID 26908709
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2010 Nov;21(11):1875-85 PMID 20658314
Cites: Nutr Cancer. 2006;55(1):28-34 PMID 16965238
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2001 Dec;12(10):917-25 PMID 11808711
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2016 Apr 1;138(7):1609-18 PMID 26505173
Cites: J Agric Food Chem. 2007 Feb 21;55(4):1337-46 PMID 17261017
Cites: Lancet Oncol. 2002 Jun;3(6):364-73 PMID 12107024
Cites: J Am Coll Nutr. 2016;35(2):143-9 PMID 25915188
Cites: Endocr Relat Cancer. 2006 Dec;13(4):995-1015 PMID 17158751
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1991 Sep;54(3):520-5 PMID 1652197
Cites: Cancer Detect Prev. 1986;9(1-2):47-58 PMID 3731194
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2017 Mar;26(3):346-354 PMID 27765796
Cites: Obes Facts. 2009;2(3):179-86 PMID 20054223
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2015 Apr 15;136(8):1909-20 PMID 25220168
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2006 Dec;17(10):1253-61 PMID 17111256
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1995 Jul-Aug;4(5):567-71 PMID 7549816
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1998 Feb 4;90(3):226-33 PMID 9462680
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2012 Jun;23 (6):941-50 PMID 22527172
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2013 Jul 28;110(2):375-83 PMID 23218116
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2009 Feb 1;124(3):745-50 PMID 19004010
Cites: Carcinogenesis. 2000 Mar;21(3):427-33 PMID 10688862
Cites: Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2014 Jun;145(2):461-70 PMID 24737167
Cites: Nutr J. 2012 Mar 13;11:12 PMID 22413931
Cites: Int J Cancer. 1998 Jul 3;77(1):24-8 PMID 9639389
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1997 Apr;65(4 Suppl):1153S-1158S PMID 9094913
PubMed ID
29847592 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dietary habits in adolescence and midlife and risk of breast cancer in older women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296188
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(5):e0198017
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Alfheidur Haraldsdottir
Johanna E Torfadottir
Unnur A Valdimarsdottir
Hans-Olov Adami
Thor Aspelund
Laufey Tryggvadottir
Marianna Thordardottir
Bryndis E Birgisdottir
Tamara B Harris
Lenore J Launer
Vilmundur Gudnason
Laufey Steingrimsdottir
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(5):e0198017
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Dietary Supplements
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Risk
Young Adult
Abstract
Recent studies indicate that lifestyle factors in early life affect breast cancer risk. We therefore explored the association of high consumption of meat, milk, and whole grain products in adolescence and midlife, on breast cancer risk. We used data from the population based AGES-Reykjavik cohort (2002-2006), where 3,326 women with a mean age of 77 years (SD 6.0) participated. For food items and principal component derived dietary patterns we used Cox proportional models to calculate multivariate hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). During a mean follow-up of 8.8 years, 97 women were diagnosed with breast cancer. For both adolescence and midlife, daily consumption of rye bread was positively associated with breast cancer (HR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1-2.6 and HR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1-2.9, respectively). In contrast, persistent high consumption of oatmeal was negatively associated with breast cancer (0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.9). No association was found for other food items or dietary patterns that included rye bread. High rye bread consumption in adolescence and midlife may increase risk of late-life breast cancer whilst persistent consumption of oatmeal may reduce the risk.
Notes
Cites: Proc Nutr Soc. 2003 Feb;62(1):193-9 PMID 12749346
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2007 May 1;165(9):1076-87 PMID 17351290
Cites: J Nutr Health Aging. 2011 Dec;15(10):809-14 PMID 22159766
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2012 Jan 15;175(2):144-53 PMID 22190107
Cites: Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2015 May;151(1):191-8 PMID 25893586
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 Aug;17(8):2146-51 PMID 18669582
Cites: Acta Oncol. 2012 Sep;51(7):880-9 PMID 22974093
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Jul;100 Suppl 1:386S-93S PMID 24847855
Cites: BMJ. 2014 Jun 10;348:g3437 PMID 24916719
Cites: Endocrinology. 1998 Oct;139(10):4252-63 PMID 9751507
Cites: Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2014 Jun;145(3):567-79 PMID 24820413
Cites: J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2007 Aug-Sep;106(1-5):24-30 PMID 17719770
Cites: PLoS One. 2013 Apr 17;8(4):e59799 PMID 23613715
Cites: Nutr J. 2013 May 16;12:62 PMID 23679924
Cites: Epidemiol Rev. 1992;14:177-96 PMID 1289112
Cites: Crit Rev Oncol Hematol. 2008 Apr;66(1):65-74 PMID 17949989
Cites: Crit Rev Clin Lab Sci. 2007;44(5-6):483-525 PMID 17943494
Cites: Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2011 May;127(1):23-31 PMID 21442197
Cites: Nutr Rev. 2004 May;62(5):177-203 PMID 15212319
Cites: Anticancer Agents Med Chem. 2013 Jun;13(5):709-19 PMID 23140353
Cites: J Breast Cancer. 2015 Dec;18(4):313-22 PMID 26770237
Cites: Food Nutr Res. 2010 Nov 10;54:null PMID 21311613
Cites: Int J Biol Macromol. 2015 Sep;80:23-8 PMID 26092171
Cites: Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2016 Sep;159(2):335-45 PMID 27510186
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Dec;86(6):1722-9 PMID 18065592
Cites: Anticancer Res. 2014 Dec;34(12):6861-75 PMID 25503112
Cites: Pediatrics. 2016 Mar;137(3):e20151226 PMID 26908709
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2010 Nov;21(11):1875-85 PMID 20658314
Cites: Nutr Cancer. 2006;55(1):28-34 PMID 16965238
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2001 Dec;12(10):917-25 PMID 11808711
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2016 Apr 1;138(7):1609-18 PMID 26505173
Cites: J Agric Food Chem. 2007 Feb 21;55(4):1337-46 PMID 17261017
Cites: Lancet Oncol. 2002 Jun;3(6):364-73 PMID 12107024
Cites: J Am Coll Nutr. 2016;35(2):143-9 PMID 25915188
Cites: Endocr Relat Cancer. 2006 Dec;13(4):995-1015 PMID 17158751
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1991 Sep;54(3):520-5 PMID 1652197
Cites: Cancer Detect Prev. 1986;9(1-2):47-58 PMID 3731194
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2017 Mar;26(3):346-354 PMID 27765796
Cites: Obes Facts. 2009;2(3):179-86 PMID 20054223
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2015 Apr 15;136(8):1909-20 PMID 25220168
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2006 Dec;17(10):1253-61 PMID 17111256
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1995 Jul-Aug;4(5):567-71 PMID 7549816
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1998 Feb 4;90(3):226-33 PMID 9462680
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2012 Jun;23 (6):941-50 PMID 22527172
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2013 Jul 28;110(2):375-83 PMID 23218116
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2009 Feb 1;124(3):745-50 PMID 19004010
Cites: Carcinogenesis. 2000 Mar;21(3):427-33 PMID 10688862
Cites: Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2014 Jun;145(2):461-70 PMID 24737167
Cites: Nutr J. 2012 Mar 13;11:12 PMID 22413931
Cites: Int J Cancer. 1998 Jul 3;77(1):24-8 PMID 9639389
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1997 Apr;65(4 Suppl):1153S-1158S PMID 9094913
ErratumIn: PLoS One. 2018 Oct 15;13(10):e0206026 PMID 30321233
PubMed ID
29847592 View in PubMed
Less detail

29 records – page 1 of 3.