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Age as a determinant for dissemination of seasonal and pandemic influenza: an open cohort study of influenza outbreaks in Östergötland County, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126516
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(2):e31746
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Toomas Timpka
Olle Eriksson
Armin Spreco
Elin A Gursky
Magnus Strömgren
Einar Holm
Joakim Ekberg
Orjan Dahlström
Lars Valter
Henrik Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Östergötland County Council, Linköping, Sweden. toomas.timpka@liu.se
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(2):e31746
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - physiopathology
Male
Regression Analysis
Seasons
Sweden
Abstract
An understanding of the occurrence and comparative timing of influenza infections in different age groups is important for developing community response and disease control measures. This study uses data from a Scandinavian county (population 427.000) to investigate whether age was a determinant for being diagnosed with influenza 2005-2010 and to examine if age was associated with case timing during outbreaks. Aggregated demographic data were collected from Statistics Sweden, while influenza case data were collected from a county-wide electronic health record system. A logistic regression analysis was used to explore whether case risk was associated with age and outbreak. An analysis of variance was used to explore whether day for diagnosis was also associated to age and outbreak. The clinical case data were validated against case data from microbiological laboratories during one control year. The proportion of cases from the age groups 10-19 (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
22384066 View in PubMed
Less detail

Health-related quality of life and metabolic risk in patients with psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105546
Source
Schizophr Res. 2014 Jan;152(1):295-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Anniqa Foldemo
Rikard Wärdig
Margareta Bachrach-Lindström
Gunnar Edman
Tommy Holmberg
Torbjörn Lindström
Lars Valter
Urban Osby
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden; R&D Department, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden. Electronic address: anniqa.foldemo@liu.se.
Source
Schizophr Res. 2014 Jan;152(1):295-9
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Metabolic Diseases - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Quality of Life - psychology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Improved Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is an alternative treatment goal for individuals with psychosis, who have up to two times greater prevalence of type 2 diabetes, hypertension and obesity than the general population.
to compare HRQoL in patients with psychosis, especially schizophrenia, with a reference sample and explore the relationship between HRQoL and metabolic risk factors in these patients.
a prospective cohort study was carried out in specialized psychiatric outpatient departments in Sweden. The patients were invited consecutively. A prospective population-based study of public health in the south-east of Sweden served as reference group. Patients were assessed with psychiatric questionnaires that included Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). Health-related quality of life was assessed using the questionnaire EQ5D, both for patients and the population, and several other health status outcomes were used.
At 73%, schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder were the most common diagnoses in the patient group. The results in patients (n=903) and population (n=7238) showed significant differences in lower EQ5D among patients. According to the definition by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), elevated blood pressure was the only metabolic risk associated with lower HRQoL in patients. Raised LDL-cholesterol levels were also significantly related to lower HRQoL.
patients suffering from psychosis had significantly lower HRQoL regarding all components in EQ5D, except for the pain/discomfort component. Almost half of the patient group met the criteria for metabolic syndrome. According to the IDF criteria, elevated blood pressure was the only metabolic risk factor that had an impact on HRQoL.
PubMed ID
24355528 View in PubMed
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A high-precision protocol for identification of preschool children at risk for persisting obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162906
Source
PLoS One. 2007;2(6):e535
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Toomas Timpka
Marianne Angbratt
Per Bolme
Göran Hermansson
Anders Häger
Lars Valter
Author Affiliation
Section of Social Medicine and Public Health, Department of Health and Society, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. tti@ida.liu.se
Source
PLoS One. 2007;2(6):e535
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Adolescent
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prognosis
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Recent studies suggest that adolescent adiposity is established already in preadolescence. Earlier studies have confirmed a strong tracking of obesity from adolescence to adulthood. Our aim was to examine the diagnostic accuracy of a population-derived protocol for identification of preschool children at risk for obesity in preadolescence.
We analysed data obtained for child health surveillance up to age 5 from 5778 children born in a Swedish county in 1991. The basic data set included age, sex, and weight and height measurements from the regular checkups between ages 1.5 and 5. Data not routinely collected in the child health centre setting were disregarded. The children were at age 10 randomly assigned to protocol derivation and validation cohorts and assessed for obesity according to IOTF criteria. The accuracy of predicting obesity in the validation cohort was measured using decision precision, specificity, and sensitivity. The decision protocol selected 1.4% of preschool children as being at obesity risk. The precision of the protocol at age 10 was 82% for girls and 80% for boys, and the specificity was 100% for both boys and girls. The sensitivity was higher for girls (41%) than for boys (21%). The relative risk for obesity at age 10 estimated by the odds ratio for individuals selected by the protocol compared to non-selected peers was 212.6 (95% confidence interval 56.6 to 798.4) for girls and 120.3 (95% CI 24.5 to 589.9) for boys.
A simple and inexpensive decision protocol based on BMI values proved to have high precision and specificity for identification of preschool children at risk for obesity persisting into adolescence, while the sensitivity was low especially for boys. Implementation and further evaluations of the protocol in child health centre settings are warranted.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17579709 View in PubMed
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How common are long-lasting, intensely itching vaccination granulomas and contact allergy to aluminium induced by currently used pediatric vaccines? A prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263462
Source
Eur J Pediatr. 2014 Oct;173(10):1297-307
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Elisabet Bergfors
Göran Hermansson
Ulla Nyström Kronander
Lars Falk
Lars Valter
Birger Trollfors
Source
Eur J Pediatr. 2014 Oct;173(10):1297-307
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aluminum - adverse effects
Child
Child, Preschool
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine - adverse effects - chemistry
Diphtheria-Tetanus-acellular Pertussis Vaccines - adverse effects - chemistry
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Granuloma - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Haemophilus Vaccines - adverse effects - chemistry
Humans
Infant
Male
Pneumococcal Vaccines - adverse effects - chemistry
Poliovirus Vaccine, Inactivated - adverse effects - chemistry
Prospective Studies
Pruritus - epidemiology - etiology
Risk
Sweden
Vaccines, Combined - adverse effects - chemistry
Abstract
The frequency of long-lasting, intensely itching subcutaneous nodules at the injection site for aluminium (Al)-adsorbed vaccines (vaccination granulomas) was investigated in a prospective cohort study comprising 4,758 children who received either a diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis-polio-Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine (Infanrix?, Pentavac?) alone or concomitant with a pneumococcal conjugate (Prevenar). Both vaccines were adsorbed to an Al adjuvant. Altogether 38 children (0.83 %) with itching granulomas were identified, epicutaneously tested for Al sensitisation and followed yearly. Contact allergy to Al was verified in 85 %. The median duration of symptoms was 22 months in those hitherto recovered. The frequency of granulomas induced by Infanrix? was >0.66 % and by Prevenar >0.35 %. The risk for granulomas increased from 0.63 to 1.18 % when a second Al-adsorbed vaccine was added to the schedule.
Long-lasting itching vaccination granulomas are poorly understood but more frequent than previously known after infant vaccination with commonly used diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis-polio-Haemophilus influenzae type b and pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. The risk increases with the number of vaccines given. Most children with itching granulomas become contact allergic to aluminium. Itching vaccination granulomas are benign but may be troublesome and should be recognised early in primary health care to avoid unnecessary investigations, anxiety and mistrust.
PubMed ID
24752308 View in PubMed
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Injury rates and risk-factors associated with eventing: a total cohort study of injury events among adult Swedish eventing athletes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135053
Source
Int J Inj Contr Saf Promot. 2011 Dec;18(4):261-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Joakim Ekberg
Toomas Timpka
Henrik Ramel
Lars Valter
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. joakim.ekberg@liu.se
Source
Int J Inj Contr Saf Promot. 2011 Dec;18(4):261-7
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cumulative Trauma Disorders - epidemiology
Female
Horses
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Severity of Illness Index
Statistics as Topic
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine injury events and risk-factors among Swedish adult eventing athletes. A cross-sectional study design with retrospective recording of 1-year sports-specific exposure and injury data was used. The invited study population consisted of all members of the Swedish Equestrian Federation with eventing as their primary discipline (n = 513). The participation rate was 70.0%. The total 1-year injury prevalence was 26.6%; the specific 1-year prevalence of traumatic injury was 19.3% and of overuse injury 10.9%. The incidence of traumatic injury events was 0.54 injury events/1000 eventing hours (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.35-0.73 injury events/1000 eventing hours) for novices and 0.35 injury events/1000 eventing hours for qualified riders (95% CI, 0.21-0.49 injury events/1000 eventing hours). A total of 27.9% of the traumatic injury events led to severe injuries (causing more than 3 weeks absence from riding). Attitude to risk-taking was the only factor predicting an athlete becoming injured (p = 0.023), and qualification level was the only risk factor for additional injuries among injured riders (p = 0.003). Our results suggest that injury prevention programs in eventing should also give attention to overuse injuries and that care should be taken when eventing athletes are licensed into higher qualification groups.
PubMed ID
21512929 View in PubMed
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