Skip header and navigation

Refine By

23 records – page 1 of 3.

Alcohol consumption and alcohol problems after bariatric surgery in the Swedish obese subjects study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115320
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2013 Dec;21(12):2444-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Per-Arne Svensson
Åsa Anveden
Stefano Romeo
Markku Peltonen
Sofie Ahlin
Maria Antonella Burza
Björn Carlsson
Peter Jacobson
Anna-Karin Lindroos
Hans Lönroth
Cristina Maglio
Ingmar Näslund
Kajsa Sjöholm
Hans Wedel
Bo Söderpalm
Lars Sjöström
Lena M S Carlsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, SE-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2013 Dec;21(12):2444-51
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcohol-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Body mass index
Case-Control Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gastric Bypass
Gastroplasty
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - surgery
Postoperative Care
Prospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Increased sensitivity to alcohol after gastric bypass has been described. The aim of this study was to investigate whether bariatric surgery is associated with alcohol problems.
The prospective, controlled Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) study enrolled 2,010 obese patients who underwent bariatric surgery (68% vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG), 19% banding, and 13% gastric bypass) and 2,037 matched controls. Patients were recruited between 1987 and 2001. Data on alcohol abuse diagnoses, self-reported alcohol consumption, and alcohol problems were obtained from the National Patient Register and questionnaires. Follow-up time was 8-22 years.
During follow-up, 93.1% of the surgery patients and 96.0% of the controls reported alcohol consumption classified as low risk by the World Health Organization (WHO). However, compared to controls, the gastric bypass group had increased risk of alcohol abuse diagnoses (adjusted hazard ratio [adjHR] = 4.97), alcohol consumption at least at the WHO medium risk level (adjHR = 2.69), and alcohol problems (adjHR = 5.91). VBG increased the risk of these conditions with adjHRs of 2.23, 1.52, and 2.30, respectively, while banding was not different from controls.
Alcohol consumption, alcohol problems, and alcohol abuse are increased after gastric bypass and VBG.
PubMed ID
23520203 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of bariatric surgery with long-term remission of type 2 diabetes and with microvascular and macrovascular complications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104186
Source
JAMA. 2014 Jun 11;311(22):2297-304
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-11-2014
Author
Lars Sjöström
Markku Peltonen
Peter Jacobson
Sofie Ahlin
Johanna Andersson-Assarsson
Åsa Anveden
Claude Bouchard
Björn Carlsson
Kristjan Karason
Hans Lönroth
Ingmar Näslund
Elisabeth Sjöström
Magdalena Taube
Hans Wedel
Per-Arne Svensson
Kajsa Sjöholm
Lena M S Carlsson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
JAMA. 2014 Jun 11;311(22):2297-304
Date
Jun-11-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bariatric Surgery
Blood glucose
Case-Control Studies
Diabetes Complications - prevention & control
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - surgery
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - surgery
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Weight Loss
Abstract
Short-term studies show that bariatric surgery causes remission of diabetes. The long-term outcomes for remission and diabetes-related complications are not known.
To determine the long-term diabetes remission rates and the cumulative incidence of microvascular and macrovascular diabetes complications after bariatric surgery.
The Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) is a prospective matched cohort study conducted at 25 surgical departments and 480 primary health care centers in Sweden. Of patients recruited between September 1, 1987, and January 31, 2001, 260 of 2037 control patients and 343 of 2010 surgery patients had type 2 diabetes at baseline. For the current analysis, diabetes status was determined at SOS health examinations until May 22, 2013. Information on diabetes complications was obtained from national health registers until December 31, 2012. Participation rates at the 2-, 10-, and 15-year examinations were 81%, 58%, and 41% in the control group and 90%, 76%, and 47% in the surgery group. For diabetes assessment, the median follow-up time was 10 years (interquartile range [IQR], 2-15) and 10 years (IQR, 10-15) in the control and surgery groups, respectively. For diabetes complications, the median follow-up time was 17.6 years (IQR, 14.2-19.8) and 18.1 years (IQR, 15.2-21.1) in the control and surgery groups, respectively.
Adjustable or nonadjustable banding (n = 61), vertical banded gastroplasty (n = 227), or gastric bypass (n = 55) procedures were performed in the surgery group, and usual obesity and diabetes care was provided to the control group.
Diabetes remission, relapse, and diabetes complications. Remission was defined as blood glucose
PubMed ID
24915261 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) gene SNPs and transcript expression levels with severe obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132949
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Jan;20(1):178-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Stephen J Clark
Mario Falchi
Bob Olsson
Peter Jacobson
Stéphane Cauchi
Beverley Balkau
Michel Marre
Olivier Lantieri
Johanna C Andersson
Margareta Jernås
Timothy J Aitman
Sylvia Richardson
Lars Sjöström
Hang Y Wong
Lena M S Carlsson
Philippe Froguel
Andrew J Walley
Author Affiliation
Department of Genomics of Common Diseases, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK.
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Jan;20(1):178-85
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Case-Control Studies
Child
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Female
Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Obesity, Morbid - epidemiology - genetics
Odds Ratio
PPAR gamma - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Siblings
Sirtuin 1 - genetics
Sweden - epidemiology
Up-Regulation
Abstract
Recent studies have reported associations of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to both obesity and BMI. This study was designed to investigate association between SIRT1 SNPs, SIRT1 gene expression and obesity. Case-control analyses were performed using 1,533 obese subjects (896 adults, BMI >40 kg/m(2) and 637 children, BMI >97th percentile for age and sex) and 1,237 nonobese controls, all French Caucasians. Two SNPs (in high linkage disequilibrium (LD), r(2) = 0.96) were significantly associated with adult obesity, rs33957861 (P value = 0.003, odds ratio (OR) = 0.75, confidence interval (CI) = 0.61-0.92) and rs11599176 (P value: 0.006, OR = 0.74, CI = 0.61-0.90). Expression of SIRT1 mRNA was measured in BMI-discordant siblings from 154 Swedish families. Transcript expression was significantly correlated to BMI in the lean siblings (r(2) = 0.13, P value = 3.36 ? 10(-7)) and lower SIRT1 expression was associated with obesity (P value = 1.56 ? 10(-35)). There was also an association between four SNPs (rs11599176, rs12413112, rs33957861, and rs35689145) and BMI (P values: 4 ? 10(-4), 6 ? 10(-4), 4 ? 10(-4), and 2 ? 10(-3)) with the rare allele associated with a lower BMI. However, no SNP was associated with SIRT1 transcript expression level. In summary, both SNPs and SIRT1 gene expression are associated with severe obesity.
Notes
Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 2000 Jan;66(1):279-9210631157
Cites: J Intern Med. 2005 Feb;257(2):167-7515656875
Cites: Nat Genet. 2002 Jan;30(1):97-10111731797
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2005 Mar;29 Suppl 1:S36-915711582
Cites: Hum Hered. 2005;60(1):19-25; discussion 61-216118503
Cites: Diabetes. 2006 Feb;55(2):545-5016443793
Cites: Diabetes. 2006 Apr;55(4):1157-6216567542
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2006 Jul;21(7):993-100216813520
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 Jul 5;103(27):10230-516790548
Cites: Trends Endocrinol Metab. 2006 Jul;17(5):186-9116684606
Cites: Nature. 2006 Nov 16;444(7117):337-4217086191
Cites: Cell. 2006 Dec 15;127(6):1109-2217112576
Cites: J Biol Chem. 2006 Dec 29;281(52):39915-2417090532
Cites: J Appl Physiol (1985). 2007 Feb;102(2):529-4017082363
Cites: Nature. 2007 Feb 22;445(7130):881-517293876
Cites: EMBO J. 2007 Apr 4;26(7):1913-2317347648
Cites: Science. 2007 Jun 1;316(5829):1331-617463246
Cites: Mol Cell Biol. 2007 Jul;27(13):4698-70717452443
Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 2007 Sep;81(3):559-7517701901
Cites: Nature. 2007 Nov 29;450(7170):712-618046409
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2008 Aug;32(8):1250-518560370
Cites: Hum Genet. 2008 Nov;124(4):431-618820948
Cites: Cell Metab. 2008 Nov;8(5):347-5819046567
Cites: Nat Genet. 2009 Feb;41(2):157-919151714
Cites: Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2009 May 22;383(1):63-719332024
Cites: Nature. 2009 Apr 23;458(7241):1056-6019262508
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Oct;33(10):1143-5219652658
Cites: Nat Genet. 2001 Dec;29(4):365-7111726920
Cites: Diabetes. 2002 Jan;51(1):37-4111756320
Cites: Science. 2002 Jun 21;296(5576):2225-912029063
Cites: Diabetes. 2002 Jul;51(7):2306-1212086965
Cites: J Chromatogr B Analyt Technol Biomed Life Sci. 2002 Dec 25;782(1-2):73-8712457997
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2002 Dec 10;99(25):15983-712444247
Cites: Biostatistics. 2003 Apr;4(2):249-6412925520
Cites: Nature. 2004 Jun 17;429(6993):771-615175761
Cites: Science. 2004 Jul 16;305(5682):390-215205477
Cites: Horm Res. 2004;62(2):92-615263821
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 1991 Jan;45(1):13-211855495
Cites: Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 1999 Apr 2;257(1):79-8310092513
Cites: Genes Dev. 1999 Oct 1;13(19):2570-8010521401
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2005 Jan 15;21(2):263-515297300
Cites: Diabetes. 2009 Dec;58(12):2828-3419741164
PubMed ID
21760635 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bariatric surgery and long-term cardiovascular events.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128246
Source
JAMA. 2012 Jan 4;307(1):56-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-4-2012
Author
Lars Sjöström
Markku Peltonen
Peter Jacobson
C David Sjöström
Kristjan Karason
Hans Wedel
Sofie Ahlin
Åsa Anveden
Calle Bengtsson
Gerd Bergmark
Claude Bouchard
Björn Carlsson
Sven Dahlgren
Jan Karlsson
Anna-Karin Lindroos
Hans Lönroth
Kristina Narbro
Ingmar Näslund
Torsten Olbers
Per-Arne Svensson
Lena M S Carlsson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. lars.v.sjostrom@medfak.gu.se
Source
JAMA. 2012 Jan 4;307(1):56-65
Date
Jan-4-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bariatric Surgery
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - prevention & control
Case-Control Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - prevention & control
Obesity - surgery
Prospective Studies
Stroke - mortality - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Weight Loss
Abstract
Obesity is a risk factor for cardiovascular events. Weight loss might protect against cardiovascular events, but solid evidence is lacking.
To study the association between bariatric surgery, weight loss, and cardiovascular events.
The Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) study is an ongoing, nonrandomized, prospective, controlled study conducted at 25 public surgical departments and 480 primary health care centers in Sweden of 2010 obese participants who underwent bariatric surgery and 2037 contemporaneously matched obese controls who received usual care. Patients were recruited between September 1, 1987, and January 31, 2001. Date of analysis was December 31, 2009, with median follow-up of 14.7 years (range, 0-20 years). Inclusion criteria were age 37 to 60 years and a body mass index of at least 34 in men and at least 38 in women. Exclusion criteria were identical in surgery and control patients. Surgery patients underwent gastric bypass (13.2%), banding (18.7%), or vertical banded gastroplasty (68.1%), and controls received usual care in the Swedish primary health care system. Physical and biochemical examinations and database cross-checks were undertaken at preplanned intervals.
The primary end point of the SOS study (total mortality) was published in 2007. Myocardial infarction and stroke were predefined secondary end points, considered separately and combined.
Bariatric surgery was associated with a reduced number of cardiovascular deaths (28 events among 2010 patients in the surgery group vs 49 events among 2037 patients in the control group; adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.47; 95% CI, 0.29-0.76; P = .002). The number of total first time (fatal or nonfatal) cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction or stroke, whichever came first) was lower in the surgery group (199 events among 2010 patients) than in the control group (234 events among 2037 patients; adjusted HR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.54-0.83; P
Notes
Comment In: Nat Rev Endocrinol. 2012 Mar;8(3):13022271190
Comment In: JAMA. 2012 Apr 18;307(15):1577; author reply 1577-822511678
Comment In: Nat Rev Cardiol. 2012 Mar;9(3):12622271018
Comment In: Praxis (Bern 1994). 2012 May 9;101(10):673-522565560
Comment In: JAMA. 2012 Jan 4;307(1):88-922215170
PubMed ID
22215166 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in uric acid levels following bariatric surgery are not associated with SLC2A9 variants in the Swedish Obese Subjects Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117777
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(12):e51658
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Mark A Sarzynski
Peter Jacobson
Tuomo Rankinen
Björn Carlsson
Lars Sjöström
Claude Bouchard
Lena M S Carlsson
Author Affiliation
Human Genomics Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States of America.
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(12):e51658
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bariatric Surgery - methods
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Genotype
Glucose Transport Proteins, Facilitative - metabolism
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - metabolism
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Sweden
Time Factors
Uric Acid - metabolism
Abstract
Obesity and SLC2A9 genotype are strong determinants of uric acid levels. However, data on SLC2A9 variants and weight loss induced changes in uric acid levels are missing. We examined whether the changes in uric acid levels two- and ten-years after weight loss induced by bariatric surgery were associated with SLC2A9 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Swedish Obese Subjects study.
SNPs (N?=?14) identified by genome-wide association studies and exonic SNPs in the SLC2A9 gene locus were genotyped. Cross-sectional associations were tested before (N?=?1806), two (N?=?1664) and ten years (N?=?1201) after bariatric surgery. Changes in uric acid were compared between baseline and Year 2 (N?=?1660) and years 2 and 10 (N?=?1172). A multiple testing corrected threshold of P?=?0.007 was used for statistical significance.
Overall, 11 of the 14 tested SLC2A9 SNPs were significantly associated with cross-sectional uric acid levels at all three time points, with rs13113918 showing the strongest association at each time point (R(2)?=?3.7-5.2%, 3.9?10(-22)=p=7.7?10(-11)). One SNP (rs737267) showed a significant association (R(2)?=?0.60%, P?=?0.002) with change in uric acid levels from baseline to Year 2, as common allele homozygotes (C/C, N?=?957) showed a larger decrease in uric acid (-61.4 ?mol/L) compared to minor allele carriers (A/X: -51.7 ?mol/L, N?=?702). No SNPs were associated with changes in uric acid from years 2 to 10.
SNPs in the SLC2A9 locus contribute significantly to uric acid levels in obese individuals, and the associations persist even after considerable weight loss due to bariatric surgery. However, we found little evidence for an interaction between genotype and weight change on the response of uric acid to bariatric surgery over ten years. Thus, the fluctuations in uric acid levels among the surgery group appear to be driven by the weight losses and gains, independent of SLC2A9 genotypes.
Notes
Cites: Hum Genet. 1982;60(3):257-617106756
Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 2004 Apr;74(4):765-914997420
Cites: J Chronic Dis. 1985;38(4):281-83889027
Cites: Int J Obes. 1986;10(4):255-643771090
Cites: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1992 Jun;16(6):465-791322873
Cites: Am J Physiol. 1995 Jan;268(1 Pt 1):E1-57840165
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1996 Feb 15;334(7):445-518552148
Cites: Metabolism. 1997 Oct;46(10):1162-59322800
Cites: Diabetes Metab. 1998 Sep;24(4):355-619805647
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2004 Dec 23;351(26):2683-9315616203
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2005 Apr 11;165(7):742-815824292
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 2006 Oct;19(10):1055-6217027827
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 2007;22(7):439-4517484024
Cites: Mol Membr Biol. 2007 Sep-Dec;24(5-6):455-6317710649
Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 2008 Jan;82(1):139-4918179892
Cites: Nat Genet. 2008 Apr;40(4):430-618327256
Cites: Nat Genet. 2008 Apr;40(4):437-4218327257
Cites: PLoS Genet. 2007 Nov;3(11):e19417997608
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2008 Aug;31(8):1662-718487473
Cites: PLoS Med. 2008 Oct 7;5(10):e19718842065
Cites: Lancet. 2008 Dec 6;372(9654):1953-6118834626
Cites: Atherosclerosis. 2009 Jan;202(1):11-718585721
Cites: PLoS Genet. 2009 Jun;5(6):e100050419503597
Cites: Lancet. 2010 Jan 23;375(9711):318-2819692116
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2010 Feb;37(2):410-620032099
Cites: BMC Med Genomics. 2011;4:1721294900
Cites: Arq Bras Endocrinol Metabol. 2011 Feb;55(1):38-4521468518
Cites: Hum Genet. 2000 Mar;106(3):355-910798367
Cites: JAMA. 2000 May 10;283(18):2404-1010815083
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2000 Feb;16(2):182-310842743
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2000 Jul;59(7):539-4310873964
Cites: Nat Genet. 2002 Jan;30(1):97-10111731797
Cites: Mol Membr Biol. 2001 Oct-Dec;18(4):247-5611780753
Cites: Hypertension. 2003 Oct;42(4):474-8012953019
Cites: Acta Genet Med Gemellol (Roma). 1983;32(2):117-266685961
PubMed ID
23272134 View in PubMed
Less detail

Determinants of Diabetes Remission and Glycemic Control After Bariatric Surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274027
Source
Diabetes Care. 2016 Jan;39(1):166-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Simona Panunzi
Lena Carlsson
Andrea De Gaetano
Markku Peltonen
Toni Rice
Lars Sjöström
Geltrude Mingrone
John B Dixon
Source
Diabetes Care. 2016 Jan;39(1):166-74
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bariatric Surgery
Blood Glucose - analysis
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - surgery
Female
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - surgery
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Remission Induction
Sweden
Waist Circumference
Weight Loss
Abstract
Eligibility criteria for bariatric surgery in diabetes include BMI =35 kg/m(2) and poorly controlled glycemia. However, BMI does not predict diabetes remission, and thus, predictors need to be identified.
Seven hundred twenty-seven patients were included in a database merged from the Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) study and two randomized controlled studies, with 415 surgical and 312 medical patients in total. Bariatric operations were divided into gastric only (GO) and gastric plus diversion (GD).
Sixty-four percent of patients in the surgical arm and 15.0% in the medical arm experienced diabetes remission (P
PubMed ID
26628418 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dietary patterns, cardiometabolic risk factors, and the incidence of cardiovascular disease in severe obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268253
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2015 May;23(5):1063-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
David J Johns
Anna-Karin Lindroos
Susan A Jebb
Lars Sjöström
Lena M S Carlsson
Gina L Ambrosini
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2015 May;23(5):1063-70
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Female
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Incidence
Insulin Resistance
Lipids - blood
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - epidemiology - prevention & control
Middle Aged
Obesity, Morbid - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Waist Circumference
Abstract
The longitudinal associations between a dietary pattern (DP) and cardiometabolic risk factors and cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence were investigated in a cohort of adults with severe obesity.
The analysis included 2,037 individuals with severe obesity (>34 and >38 kg/m(2) for men and women, respectively) from the Swedish Obese Subjects study repeatedly followed up for 10 years. Reduced rank regression was used to identify a DP characterized by dietary energy density, saturated fat intake, and fiber density. Mixed models examined relationships between repeated measures of DP z-scores and cardiometabolic risk factors. Cox proportional hazards models assessed relationships between DP scores and CVD incidence.
An energy-dense, high-saturated-fat, and low-fiber DP was derived. A one-unit increase in the DP z-score between follow-ups was associated with an increase in weight [ß (SE)] (1.71?±?0.10 kg), waist circumference (1.49?±?0.07 cm), BMI (0.60?±?0.34 kg/m2), serum cholesterol (0.06?±?0.01 mmol/l), and serum insulin (1.22?±?0.17 mmol/l; all P?
Notes
Comment In: Nat Rev Endocrinol. 2015 Aug;11(8):448-926032106
PubMed ID
25865622 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effort-related calf pain in the obese and long-term changes after surgical obesity treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49624
Source
Obes Res. 2005 Jan;13(1):137-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Kristjan Karason
Markku Peltonen
Anna Karin Lindroos
Lars Sjöström
Lars Lönn
Jarl S Torgerson
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, SE-413 45 Göteborg, Sweden. kristjan.karason@medfak.gu.se
Source
Obes Res. 2005 Jan;13(1):137-45
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Employment
Exercise
Gastric Bypass
Humans
Intermittent Claudication - epidemiology - etiology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - surgery
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Sweden - epidemiology
Weight Loss - physiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare the prevalence of effort-related calf pain in an obese and a general population and to analyze the incidence of and recovery from such pain after surgical and conventional obesity treatment. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: A random sample of 1135 subjects from a general population was compared with 6328 obese subjects in the Swedish Obese Subjects study. Obese subjects were followed longitudinally, and information about calf pain was obtained from surgically and conventionally treated patients for up to 6 years. RESULTS: In both sexes, self-reported calf pain was more common in the obese than in the general population [odds ratios (ORs) 5.0 and 4.0 in men and women, respectively, p
PubMed ID
15761173 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evidence for gender-specific associations between leptin and olfaction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52195
Source
J Gend Specif Med. 2002 Nov-Dec;5(6):25-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
A Cecilia Karlsson
Anna Karin Lindroos
Lauren Lissner
Jarl S Torgerson
Björn Carlsson
Lena M S Carlsson
Lars Sjöström
Author Affiliation
Department of Body Composition and Metabolism, Vita Stråket 15, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, SE-413 45 Göteborg, Sweden. cecilia.karlsson@medic.gu.se
Source
J Gend Specif Med. 2002 Nov-Dec;5(6):25-32
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Adult
Body mass index
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Leptin - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - blood - physiopathology
Odors
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Smell
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin regulates food intake by stimulation of the long leptin receptor isoform in the hypothalamus. The long leptin receptor is also expressed in the piriform cortex, an area involved in the relay of olfactory cues. In rodents, both olfaction and leptin influence food seeking. OBJECTIVE: To examine whether serum leptin levels are associated with olfaction in humans. SUBJECTS: Two distinct samples were analyzed. The population-based sample, 60 men and 61 women, was randomly selected from a population living in Mölndal, Sweden. The obese sample, 31 men and 27 women, was from the ongoing Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) study. METHODS: Olfactory function was assessed with a two-part test used at Connecticut Chemosensory Clinical Research Center. RESULTS: In the population-based sample, multiple regression analysis revealed a gender difference (interaction gender x leptin; P = .016) between the association of odor identification and logarithmically transformed (log) leptin when adjusting for smoking and log body mass index (BMI). In men the association was positive (beta = 13.2; P = .0026), whereas in women it was negative (beta = -11.4; P = .050). When further adjusting for the influence of menopause and estrogen treatment, the negative association between odor identification and leptin became stronger for women in the population-based sample (beta = -13.7; P = .027). In the obese sample, the associations were similar in direction to those observed in the population-based sample, although nonsignificant. CONCLUSION: Serum leptin levels were associated with odor identification in a randomly selected population. The association was gender-specific and independent of BMI. High odor identification scores were associated with high serum leptin levels in men and low serum leptin levels in women. This provides further support for previously recognized gender differences in the leptin system and suggests alternative ways for leptin to modulate its effects.
PubMed ID
12503223 View in PubMed
Less detail

The GH receptor exon 3 deleted/full-length polymorphism is associated with central adiposity in the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261228
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2015 Feb;172(2):123-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Camilla A M Glad
Lena M S Carlsson
Olle Melander
Peter Almgren
Lars Sjöström
Staffan Nilsson
Ingrid Larsson
Per-Arne Svensson
Gudmundur Johannsson
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2015 Feb;172(2):123-8
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exons - genetics
Female
Gene Deletion
Genetic Association Studies - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity, Abdominal - diagnosis - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Population Surveillance - methods
Prospective Studies
Receptors, Somatotropin - genetics
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To test the hypothesis that the GH receptor (GHR) exon 3 deleted (d3)/full-length (fl) polymorphism influences anthropometry and body composition in the general population.
The Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) reference study is a cross-sectional population-based study, randomly selected from a population registry. A subgroup of the population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer study (MDC-CC) was used as a replication cohort.
The SOS reference study comprises 1135 subjects (46.2% men), with an average age of 49.5 years. The MDC-CC includes 5451 successfully genotyped subjects (41.5% men), with an average age of 57.5 years. GHR d3/fl genotypes were determined using TagSNP rs6873545. Linear regression analyses were used to test for genotype-phenotype associations.
In the SOS reference study, subjects homozygous for the d3-GHR weighed ~4?kg more (P=0.011), and had larger waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, P=0.036), larger waist circumference (P=0.016), and more fat-free mass estimated from total body potassium (P=0.026) than grouped fl/d3 and fl/fl subjects (d3-recessive genetic model). The association with WHR was replicated in the MDC-CC (P=0.002), but not those with other anthropometric traits.
In this population-based study, the GHR d3/fl polymorphism was found to be of functional relevance and associated with central adiposity, such that subjects homozygous for the d3-GHR showed an increased abdominal obesity.
PubMed ID
25391539 View in PubMed
Less detail

23 records – page 1 of 3.