Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

18 records – page 1 of 2.

Henrik Sjöbring and the concept of individual psychology in psychiatry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270014
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 2015 May;120(2):95-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Lars Oreland
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 2015 May;120(2):95-103
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
History, 20th Century
Psychiatry
Sweden
Notes
Cites: Lakartidningen. 1998 Jan 28;95(5):383-4, 387-909492483
Cites: Nord Med. 1957 Jan 3;57(1):3-513400310
Cites: Psychol Med. 1980 May;10(2):201-106992182
Cites: Sydsven Medicinhist Sallsk Arsskr. 1980;:124-3311628686
Cites: Br J Med Psychol. 1966 Mar;39(1):55-95904522
Cites: J Affect Disord. 1998 Apr;49(1):45-549574859
Cites: Psychiatry Res. 1983 Dec;10(4):253-616199807
Cites: Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 1995;245(4-5):189-957578280
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1975 Aug;52(2):107-151146593
Cites: Sven Lakartidn. 1956 May 18;53(20):1281-9113337649
Cites: Sven Lakartidn. 1950 Dec 22;47(51):2925-3614798574
PubMed ID
25906975 View in PubMed
Less detail

Why do adolescents drink? Motivational patterns related to alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96508
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2010 Aug;45(10):1589-604
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Erika Comasco
Kenneth Berglund
Lars Oreland
Kent W Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Center for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Central Hospital Västerås, Sweden. erika.comasco@neuro.uu.se
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2010 Aug;45(10):1589-604
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The present study was designed to investigate motivational patterns for drinking alcohol and their relation about alcohol consumption and problems related to alcohol consumption. Data were collected by semistructured interviews and questionnaires, containing questions about reasons for drinking, alcohol consumption, and problems related to alcohol consumption during the years 2001, 2004, and 2005. Three independent population samples from two different counties of central Sweden were included. A total of 11,167 adolescents participated. Data on reasons for drinking were analyzed by factor analysis to extract components explaining drinking motives. Relationships between motivational patterns and alcohol use were examined with correlation analysis. Three drinking motives emerged (social-enhancement, coping, and dominance motives) and related to alcohol consumption and problems related to alcohol consumption. Limitations of the study are noted and discussed.
PubMed ID
20590377 View in PubMed
Less detail

Three-way interaction effect of 5-HTTLPR, BDNF Val66Met, and childhood adversity on depression: a replication study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115653
Source
Eur Neuropsychopharmacol. 2013 Oct;23(10):1300-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Erika Comasco
Cecilia Åslund
Lars Oreland
Kent W Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Unit of Pharmacology, Uppsala University, BMC, Box 593S-751 24 Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Eur Neuropsychopharmacol. 2013 Oct;23(10):1300-6
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Development
Alleles
Amino Acid Substitution
Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor - genetics - metabolism
Child
Child Abuse - psychology
Child Development
Cohort Studies
Depression - etiology - genetics - metabolism
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Gene-Environment Interaction
Genetic Association Studies
Humans
Male
Polymorphism, Genetic
Promoter Regions, Genetic
Serotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Stress, Physiological
Stress, Psychological - physiopathology
Sweden
Abstract
Both the serotonin transporter linked promoter region (5-HTTLPR) and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphisms have been shown to interact with unfavourable environment in relation to depression symptoms and to depression diagnosis. Several attempts have been made to study a three-way interaction effect of these factors on depression, however with contradictory results. We aimed to test the hypothesis of a three-way interaction effect and to attempt at replication in an independent population-based sample. Family maltreatment, sexual abuse and depression were self-reported by an adolescent population-based cohort (N=1393) from the county of Västmanland, Sweden. DNA was isolated from saliva, and used for genotyping of the 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met polymorphisms. Neither 5-HTTLPR or BDNF genotypes separately, nor in interaction with each other had any relation to depression, however in an environment adjusted model a two-way interaction and a three-way interaction effect was found. Both 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met interacted with unfavourable environment in relation to depressive symptoms (Adj R²=0.19). Depressive symptoms and depression were more common among carriers of either the ss/sl+Val/Val or the ll+Met genotypes in the presence of early-life adversities. This three-way effect was more pronounced among girls. The current study, with a virtually similar set-up compared to previous studies, can partially confirm previous findings and their generalizability. The study also shows the importance of genetic plasticity in individuals with different environmental exposure, for different phenotypic expression.
PubMed ID
23481907 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol consumption among pregnant women in a Swedish sample and its effects on the newborn outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125405
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2012 Oct;36(10):1779-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Erika Comasco
Gunilla Hallberg
Anders Helander
Lars Oreland
Viveka Sundelin-Wahlsten
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Unit of Pharmacology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2012 Oct;36(10):1779-86
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - blood - epidemiology
Biological Markers - blood
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - blood - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Little is known about the effects of low levels of maternal alcohol intake on the neuropsychological development of the child. This study is part of an ongoing investigation on maternal drinking and presents data on demographic variables, maternal alcohol use, and birth outcomes from that study.
The sample comprised 2,264 women from a Swedish antenatal clinic. Retrospective self-report data were collected on alcohol consumption before and during pregnancy, using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), and on nicotine use. Specific alcohol biomarkers for excessive drinking, carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) in serum and phosphatidylethanol (PEth) in whole blood, were determined during mid-pregnancy in a subsample of the women. Data on labor and early characteristics of the child were also assessed.
Before pregnancy, 89% of the women regularly consumed alcohol and 49% reported occasional or frequent binge drinking. Nicotine was used by 15% before and by 5% during pregnancy. During pregnancy, 12% continued using alcohol and 5% also admitted binge drinking. However, all alcohol biomarker values were below the reporting limits (CDT = 1.7% disialotransferrin; total PEth 
PubMed ID
22486280 View in PubMed
Less detail

Genotypes do not confer risk for delinquency but rather alter susceptibility to positive and negative environmental factors: gene-environmentinteractions of BDNF Val66Met, 5-HTTLPR, and MAOA-uVNTR [corrected].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268415
Source
Int J Neuropsychopharmacol. 2015 Mar;18(5)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Kent W Nilsson
Erika Comasco
Sheilagh Hodgins
Lars Oreland
Cecilia Åslund
Source
Int J Neuropsychopharmacol. 2015 Mar;18(5)
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor - genetics
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology
Epistasis, Genetic
Family Conflict - psychology
Female
Gene-Environment Interaction
Genetic Variation
Genotype
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - psychology
Male
Monoamine Oxidase - genetics
Parent-Child Relations
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Risk factors
Saliva - metabolism
Serotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins - genetics
Sweden
Abstract
Previous evidence of gene-by-environment interactions associated with emotional and behavioral disorders is contradictory. Differences in findings may result from variation in valence and dose of the environmental factor, and/or failure to take account of gene-by-gene interactions. The present study investigated interactions between the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene (BDNF Val66Met), the serotonin transporter gene-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA-uVNTR) polymorphisms, family conflict, sexual abuse, the quality of the child-parent relationship, and teenage delinquency.
In 2006, as part of the Survey of Adolescent Life in V?stmanland, Sweden, 1 337 high-school students, aged 17-18 years, anonymously completed questionnaires and provided saliva samples for DNA analyses.
Teenage delinquency was associated with two-, three-, and four-way interactions of each of the genotypes and the three environmental factors. Significant four-way interactions were found for BDNF Val66Met ? 5-HTTLPR?MAOA-uVNTR ? family conflicts and for BDNF Val66Met ? 5-HTTLPR?MAOA-uVNTR ? sexual abuse. Further, the two genotype combinations that differed the most in expression levels (BDNF Val66Met Val, 5-HTTLPR LL, MAOA-uVNTR LL [girls] and L [boys] vs BDNF Val66Met Val/Met, 5-HTTLPR S/LS, MAOA-uVNTR S/SS/LS) in interaction with family conflict and sexual abuse were associated with the highest delinquency scores. The genetic variants previously shown to confer vulnerability for delinquency (BDNF Val66Met Val/Met ? 5-HTTLPR S ? MAOA-uVNTR S) were associated with the lowest delinquency scores in interaction with a positive child-parent relationship.
Functional variants of the MAOA-uVNTR, 5-HTTLPR, and BDNF Val66Met, either alone or in interaction with each other, may be best conceptualized as modifying sensitivity to environmental factors that confer either risk or protection for teenage delinquency.
Notes
Cites: Addict Biol. 2011 Apr;16(2):347-5520731636
Cites: Biol Psychiatry. 2014 Jan 1;75(1):2-324314060
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2011 Oct;168(10):1041-921890791
Cites: Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2011 Nov;36(10):1562-921596481
Cites: Nord J Psychiatry. 2011 Oct;65(5):315-2221189056
Cites: Psychiatry Res. 2000 Jul 24;95(1):9-2310904119
Cites: Mol Psychiatry. 2004 Jun;9(6):546-715024395
Cites: Behav Sci Law. 2004;22(3):415-2515211560
Cites: Am J Orthopsychiatry. 1989 Jul;59(3):355-672764070
Cites: BMJ. 1998 Apr 18;316(7139):1236-89553006
Cites: Hum Mol Genet. 1999 Apr;8(4):621-410072430
Cites: J Neurosci Res. 2005 Mar 15;79(6):756-7115672416
Cites: Psychol Med. 2005 Feb;35(2):245-5615841682
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2005 May;162(5):915-2315863793
Cites: Neurosci Lett. 2005 Jun 24;381(3):340-315896496
Cites: Nat Neurosci. 2005 Jun;8(6):828-3415880108
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2005 Aug 23;102(34):12224-916093315
Cites: J Neural Transm (Vienna). 2005 Oct;112(10):1397-41015666036
Cites: Biol Psychiatry. 2006 Jan 15;59(2):121-716125147
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 Apr 18;103(16):6269-7416569698
Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 2006 May;78(5):815-2616642437
Cites: Dev Psychopathol. 2005 Spring;17(2):271-30116761546
Cites: Int J Neuropsychopharmacol. 2006 Aug;9(4):443-916212676
Cites: Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet. 2007 Mar 5;144B(2):159-6417034017
Cites: J Neural Transm (Vienna). 2007;114(6):817-2217426915
Cites: Psychiatr Genet. 2007 Aug;17(4):207-1417621163
Cites: Neuropsychopharmacology. 2007 Nov;32(11):2375-8317342170
Cites: Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet. 2008 Jan 5;147B(1):120-317579366
Cites: J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2008 Feb;36(2):223-3517786548
Cites: Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet. 2008 Jul 5;147B(5):543-917987668
Cites: Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2009 Apr;34(3):382-818990498
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2009 Mar;33(3):428-3419120058
Cites: Mol Psychiatry. 2009 Jul;14(7):681-9519153574
Cites: Mol Psychiatry. 2009 Aug;14(8):746-5419455150
Cites: Biol Psychiatry. 2009 Sep 1;66(5):468-7619541292
Cites: Behav Genet. 2009 Sep;39(5):524-3119582567
Cites: Trauma Violence Abuse. 2009 Oct;10(4):375-8819776086
Cites: Psychol Bull. 2009 Nov;135(6):885-90819883141
Cites: Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2009 Dec;34 Suppl 1:S208-1619541429
Cites: Genes Brain Behav. 2010 Feb;9(1):97-10219817874
Cites: Behav Genet. 2011 Mar;41(2):262-7220734127
Cites: Brain Res Bull. 2011 Nov 25;86(5-6):287-9721924328
Cites: Transl Psychiatry. 2011;1:e4422833190
Cites: Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2012 Oct 1;39(1):182-9122735397
Cites: Aggress Behav. 2013 Jan;39(1):52-6322987641
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2013 May;52(5):462-523622847
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2013 Oct;103 Suppl 1:S111-2123927504
Cites: Eur Neuropsychopharmacol. 2013 Oct;23(10):1300-623481907
Cites: Biol Psychiatry. 2014 Jan 1;75(1):9-1723786983
Cites: Biol Psychiatry. 2014 Jan 1;75(1):18-2424135711
Erratum In: Int J Neuropsychopharmacol. 2015 Jun;18(8). pii: pyv048. doi: 10.1093/ijnp/pyv04825958410
PubMed ID
25522433 View in PubMed
Less detail

Personality traits and platelet monoamine oxidase activity in a Swedish male criminal population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9804
Source
Neuropsychobiology. 2002;46(4):202-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Eva Longato-Stadler
Britt af Klinteberg
Håkan Garpenstrand
Lars Oreland
Jarmila Hallman
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Neuropsychobiology. 2002;46(4):202-8
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Platelets - enzymology
Comparative Study
Crime
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Monoamine Oxidase - blood
Personality Disorders - psychology
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Prisoners - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A Swedish male criminal population was grouped into personality disorder subgroups and investigated with regard to personality traits and platelet monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity. The main aim of the study was to examine the possibility of a risk factor combination by having low platelet MAO activity as well as belonging to a certain diagnostic DSM-IV axis I (drug abuse in the present series) and/or II subgroup. METHODS: Personality disorders were grouped into clusters according to the cluster system used in DSM-IV axis II. The prisoners were grouped into five subgroups and each subject completed the Karolinska Scales of Personality self-report questionnaire. The comparison group for the personality data comprised 51 non-criminal males from a longitudinal Swedish project. Platelet MAO activity was assessed for the criminals as well as for a control group including 60 non-criminal healthy male Caucasians. For testing the existence of syndromes, a configuration frequency analysis (CFA) was used. RESULTS: The results showed low scores on the socialisation and high scores on the sensation seeking-related traits impulsiveness and monotony avoidance, and the somatic anxiety-related muscular tension in the criminals with any DSM-IV mental disorder, however most markedly in cluster AB and cluster B subjects. In addition, cluster AB subjects had significantly lower platelet MAO activity than controls. Two significant 'types' were found among the criminals: one was characterised by low platelet MAO activity, cluster B personality diagnosis as well as drug abuse disorder diagnosis; and the other by a pattern of normal platelet MAO activity, no cluster B personality disorder and no drug abuse disorder diagnosis. CONCLUSION: The aggregation of certain risk factors in the same individual has been shown to contribute to the development of criminal behaviour.
PubMed ID
12566939 View in PubMed
Less detail

MAOA genotype, family relations and sexual abuse in relation to adolescent alcohol consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99167
Source
Addict Biol. 2010 Aug 23;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-23-2010
Author
Kent W Nilsson
Erika Comasco
Cecilia Aslund
Niklas Nordquist
Jerzy Leppert
Lars Oreland
Author Affiliation
Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Central Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Addict Biol. 2010 Aug 23;
Date
Aug-23-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
ABSTRACT The aim of the present study was to investigate MAOA gene-environment (G*E) interactions in relation to adolescent alcohol consumption. In the county of Västmanland, Sweden, all 17-18-year-old students were asked to complete an anonymous questionnaire and provide a saliva sample during class hours. A total of 2263 students completed the questionnaire (77.4%) and a saliva sample was provided by 2131 participants. Failed MAOA u-variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) genotype analyses and internal non-responses left 851 boys and 735 girls (total n = 1586) to be investigated. Alcohol use disorder identification test was used to measure hazardous alcohol consumption. MAOA u-VNTR was used to measure biological risk in interaction with poor family relations and experience of sexual abuse. The model was also adjusted for non-independent socioeconomic variables, separated parents, type of housing and parental unemployment. Results showed that the MAOA u-VNTR, in interaction with psychosocial risk factors, such as the quality of family relations and sexual abuse, was related to high alcohol consumption among adolescents. Girls, carrying the long MAOA u-VNTR variant showed a higher risk of being high alcohol consumers, whereas among boys, the short allele was related to higher alcohol consumption. The present study supports the hypothesis that there is a relation between MAOA u-VNTR and alcohol consumption and that this relation is modulated by environmental factors. Furthermore, the present study also supports the hypothesis that there is a sex difference in the G*E interaction.
PubMed ID
20731636 View in PubMed
Less detail

Self-reported family socioeconomic status, the 5-HTTLPR genotype, and delinquent behavior in a community-based adolescent population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120613
Source
Aggress Behav. 2013 Jan;39(1):52-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Cecilia Aslund
Erika Comasco
Niklas Nordquist
Jerzy Leppert
Lars Oreland
Kent W Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Central Hospital, Västerås, Sweden. cecilia.aslund@ltv.se
Source
Aggress Behav. 2013 Jan;39(1):52-63
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - physiology - psychology
Alleles
Family
Female
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Self Report
Serotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins - genetics
Social Class
Sweden
Abstract
Twin and adoption studies have demonstrated a significant contribution of both genetic and environmental factors to antisocial and delinquent behavior. Associations have been reported between the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) and aggression, and between socioeconomic status (SES), aggression, and serotonergic functions of the brain. We aimed to investigate associations between the 5-HTTLPR genotype and family SES in relation to delinquent behavior among adolescents. A total of 1,467 17- to 18-year-old students in the county of Västmanland, Sweden, anonymously completed a questionnaire and gave a saliva sample. Family SES had a U-shaped relation to delinquency, where adolescents with low and high family SES were the most delinquent. There were curvilinear interactions between the 5-HTTLPR genotype and family SES in relation to delinquency. Among individuals having high family SES, boys with the LL (homozygous for the long allele) or LS (heterozygous) genotypes and girls with the SS (homozygous for the short allele) or LS (heterozygous) genotypes showed the highest delinquency scores. Among individuals having low family SES, boys with the LL (homozygous for the long allele) genotype and girls with the LS (heterozygous) genotype showed the highest delinquency scores. The present study suggests evidence for an interaction between family SES and the 5-HTTLPR genotype in relation to juvenile delinquency.
PubMed ID
22987641 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescent girls and criminal activity: role of MAOA-LPR genotype and psychosocial factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167096
Source
Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet. 2007 Mar 5;144B(2):159-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-5-2007
Author
Rickard L Sjöberg
Kent W Nilsson
Hanna-Linn Wargelius
Jerzy Leppert
Leif Lindström
Lars Oreland
Author Affiliation
Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Central Hospital Västerås, Västerås, Sweden. rickard.sjoberg@ltv.se
Source
Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet. 2007 Mar 5;144B(2):159-64
Date
Mar-5-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antisocial Personality Disorder - enzymology - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Genotype
Housing
Humans
Monoamine Oxidase - genetics
Promoter Regions, Genetic - genetics
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Offenses
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Recent findings among boys show that interactions between a polymorphism in the monoamine oxidase A gene promoter region (MAOA-LPR) and psychosocial factors predict criminal activity. The objective of this study was to investigate whether this finding could be extended to adolescent girls. One hundred nineteen female adolescents were recruited among respondents to a cross-sectional study of the total population of 16- and 19-year old girls. These girls constituted a randomly selected sub-sample from groups representing different degrees of risk behavior. The subjects filled in a questionnaire and were interviewed and genotyped with regard to MAOA-LPR. The results indicate that the long, (4-repeat) allele confer an increased risk for criminal behavior in the presence of psychosocial risk. Among girls without social risk, MAOA-LPR genotype was of no importance for criminal behavior. The present results suggest that previous observations on adolescent males, which demonstrate that the short MAOA-LPR genotype and psychosocial adversity interact to predict criminal activity, may not be applicable to females.
PubMed ID
17034017 View in PubMed
Less detail

The serotonin 2A -1438 G/A receptor polymorphism in a group of Swedish male criminals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184368
Source
Neurosci Lett. 2003 Aug 28;347(3):196-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-28-2003
Author
Cecilia Berggård
Mattias Damberg
Eva Longato-Stadler
Jarmila Hallman
Lars Oreland
HÃ¥kan Garpenstrand
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Unit of Pharmacology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. cecilia.breggard@neuro.uu.se
Source
Neurosci Lett. 2003 Aug 28;347(3):196-8
Date
Aug-28-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Crime
Forensic Medicine
Genotype
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prisoners
Receptor, Serotonin, 5-HT2A
Receptors, Serotonin - genetics
Sweden
Violence
Abstract
Studies have shown that genetic components to some extent underlie behavioral disorders such as impulsive aggression and violence, and that central serotonergic mechanisms are involved in the development of such behavior. In the present study, we analyzed a polymorphism in the gene encoding the serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT2A -1438 G/A) in a group of Swedish criminals (n=97) and in a group of healthy Swedish blood donors (n=202). The 5-HT2A -1438 GG genotype was lower in the criminal group than in the control group (P=0.034). In accordance with previous results, no associations were found between the 5-HT2A -1438 G/A polymorphism and personality as measured by Karolinska Scales of Personality. Neither were there any associations between the studied polymorphism and the type of crime committed.
PubMed ID
12875919 View in PubMed
Less detail

18 records – page 1 of 2.