Skip header and navigation

Refine By

18 records – page 1 of 2.

Associations between GPX1 Pro198Leu polymorphism, erythrocyte GPX activity, alcohol consumption and breast cancer risk in a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76101
Source
Carcinogenesis. 2006 Apr;27(4):820-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Gitte Ravn-Haren
Anja Olsen
Anne Tjønneland
Lars O Dragsted
Bjørn A Nexø
Håkan Wallin
Kim Overvad
Ole Raaschou-Nielsen
Ulla Vogel
Author Affiliation
Department of Toxicology and Risk Assessment, Danish Institute for Food and Veterinary Research, Søborg, Denmark. grh@dfvf.dk
Source
Carcinogenesis. 2006 Apr;27(4):820-5
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Breast Neoplasms - etiology - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Glutathione Peroxidase - genetics - metabolism
Humans
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
Breast cancer may be related to oxidative stress. Breast cancer patients have been reported to have lower antioxidant enzyme activity than healthy controls and the polymorphism GPX1 Pro198Leu has been associated with risk of lung and breast cancer. The purpose of the present nested case-control study was to determine whether GPX1 Pro198Leu and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity in prospectively collected blood samples are associated with breast cancer risk among postmenopausal women and whether GPX activity levels are associated with other known breast cancer risk factors. We matched 377 female breast cancer cases with 377 controls all nested within the prospective 'Diet, Cancer and Health' study of 57 000 Danes. Carriers of the variant T-allele of GPX1 Pro198Leu were at 1.43-fold higher risk of breast cancer compared with non-carriers (95% CI=1.07-1.92). Pre-diagnostic GPX activity tended to be lower in cases compared with controls. GPX activity was positively correlated with intake of alcohol (P
PubMed ID
16287877 View in PubMed
Less detail

Biomarkers of Individual Foods, and Separation of Diets Using Untargeted LC-MS-based Plasma Metabolomics in a Randomized Controlled Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300058
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2019 01; 63(1):e1800215
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2019
Author
Evrim Acar
Gözde Gürdeniz
Bekzod Khakimov
Francesco Savorani
Sanne Kellebjerg Korndal
Thomas Meinert Larsen
Søren Balling Engelsen
Arne Astrup
Lars O Dragsted
Author Affiliation
Simula Metropolitan Center for Digital Engineering, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2019 01; 63(1):e1800215
Date
01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Biomarkers - blood
Carbohydrate Metabolism
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Diet
Eating
Fasting
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Spectrometry
Metabolomics - methods
Middle Aged
Norway
Phospholipids - blood - chemistry
Abstract
Self-reported dietary intake does not represent an objective unbiased assessment. The effect of the new Nordic diet (NND) versus average Danish diet (ADD) on plasma metabolic profiles is investigated to identify biomarkers of compliance and metabolic effects.
In a 26-week controlled dietary intervention study, 146 subjects followed either NND, a predominantly organic diet high in fruit, vegetables, whole grains, and fish, or ADD, a diet higher in imported and processed foods. Fasting plasma samples are analyzed with untargeted ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadruple time-of-flight. It is demonstrated that supervised machine learning with feature selection can separate NND and ADD samples with an average test set performance of up to 0.88 area under the curve. The NND plasma metabolome is characterized by diet-related metabolites, such as pipecolic acid betaine (whole grain), trimethylamine oxide, and prolyl hydroxyproline (both fish intake), while theobromine (chocolate) and proline betaine (citrus) were associated with ADD. Amino acid (i.e., indolelactic acid and hydroxy-3-methylbutyrate) and fat metabolism (butyryl carnitine) characterize ADD whereas NND is associated with higher concentrations of polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines.
The plasma metabolite profiles are predictive of dietary patterns and reflected good compliance while indicating effects of potential health benefit, including changes in fat metabolism and glucose utilization.
PubMed ID
30094970 View in PubMed
Less detail

The combined impact of adherence to five lifestyle factors on all-cause, cancer and cardiovascular mortality: a prospective cohort study among Danish men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263399
Source
Br J Nutr. 2015 Mar 14;113(5):849-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-14-2015
Author
Kristina E N Petersen
Nina F Johnsen
Anja Olsen
Vanna Albieri
Lise K H Olsen
Lars O Dragsted
Kim Overvad
Anne Tjønneland
Rikke Egeberg
Source
Br J Nutr. 2015 Mar 14;113(5):849-58
Date
Mar-14-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Abstinence
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - mortality - prevention & control - therapy
Cohort Studies
Combined Modality Therapy
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health promotion
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Motor Activity
Neoplasms - etiology - mortality - prevention & control - therapy
Nutrition Policy
Overweight - physiopathology - prevention & control - therapy
Patient compliance
Prospective Studies
Smoking Cessation
Waist Circumference
Weight Loss
Abstract
Individual lifestyle factors have been associated with lifestyle diseases and premature mortality by an accumulating body of evidence. The impact of a combination of lifestyle factors on mortality has been investigated in several studies, but few have applied a simple index taking national guidelines into account. The objective of the present prospective cohort study was to investigate the combined impact of adherence to five lifestyle factors (smoking, alcohol intake, physical activity, waist circumference and diet) on all-cause, cancer and cardiovascular mortality based on international and national health recommendations. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) with 95 % CI. During a median follow-up of 14 years, 3941 men and 2827 women died. Among men, adherence to one additional health recommendation was associated with an adjusted HR of 0·73 (95 % CI 0·71, 0·75) for all-cause mortality, 0·74 (95 % CI 0·71, 0·78) for cancer mortality and 0·70 (95 % CI 0·65, 0·75) for cardiovascular mortality. Among women, the corresponding HR was 0·72 (95 % CI 0·70, 0·75) for all-cause mortality, 0·76 (95 % CI 0·73, 0·80) for cancer mortality and 0·63 (95 % CI 0·57, 0·70) for cardiovascular mortality. In the present study, adherence to merely one additional health recommendation had a protective effect on mortality risk, indicating a huge potential in enhancing healthy lifestyle behaviours of the population.
PubMed ID
25690300 View in PubMed
Less detail

Compliance, tolerability and safety of two antioxidant-rich diets: a randomised controlled trial in male smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132562
Source
Br J Nutr. 2011 Aug;106(4):557-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Anette Karlsen
Mette Svendsen
Ingebjørg Seljeflot
Mary-Ann Sommernes
Joseph Sexton
Asgeir Brevik
Iris Erlund
Mauro Serafini
Nasser Bastani
Siv Fagertun Remberg
Grethe I Borge
Monica Hauger Carlsen
Siv Kjølsrud Bøhn
Mari C Myhrstad
Lars O Dragsted
Asim K Duttaroy
Karin Haffner
Petter Laake
Christan A Drevon
Harald Arnesen
Andrew Collins
Serena Tonstad
Rune Blomhoff
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2011 Aug;106(4):557-71
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actinidia - adverse effects
Aged
Antioxidants - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Diet - adverse effects
Diet Records
Fruit - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Oxidative Stress
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Smoking - blood
Abstract
It has been suggested that antioxidants attenuate oxidative stress and prevent oxidative stress-related diseases. Paradoxically, randomised controlled trials (RCT) using pharmacological doses of antioxidant supplements have demonstrated harmful effects in smokers. The aim of the present study was to test the compliance, tolerability and safety of two food-based antioxidant-rich diets in smokers. One of the diets provided antioxidants at levels similar to that used in RCT using supplements which previously have generated harmful effects. The present study followed a randomised, parallel-arm dietary intervention for 8 weeks (n 102) in male smokers (age = 45 years). Participants were randomised to either antioxidant-rich diet, kiwi fruit or control groups. The antioxidant-rich foods provided about 300 mmol antioxidants/week from a wide range of plant-based food items. The kiwi fruit group consumed three kiwi fruits/d. Compliance to both diets was good. Only mild, undesirable events were reported by a minority of the participants. The safety of both diets was demonstrated as no potentially harmful or pro-oxidative effects were observed. In the antioxidant-rich diet group, the mean intake of antioxidants increased from 30 mmol/d at baseline to 62 mmol/d during the intervention. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that male smokers can comply with two food-based antioxidant-rich diets. Furthermore, the present study is the first to demonstrate the tolerability and safety of dietary antioxidants at levels similar to dosages provided in RCT using supplements. Such diets may be useful in future studies investigating whether dietary antioxidants may reduce oxidative stress and related diseases.
PubMed ID
21806852 View in PubMed
Less detail

Determinants of dietary supplement use--healthy individuals use dietary supplements.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266459
Source
Br J Nutr. 2015 Jun 28;113(12):1993-2000
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-28-2015
Author
Christina L F Kofoed
Jane Christensen
Lars O Dragsted
Anne Tjønneland
Nina Roswall
Source
Br J Nutr. 2015 Jun 28;113(12):1993-2000
Date
Jun-28-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Diet
Dietary Supplements - statistics & numerical data
Educational Status
Exercise
Female
Glycosuria
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Life Style
Logistic Models
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X
Middle Aged
Minerals - administration & dosage
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Vitamins - administration & dosage
Waist Circumference
Abstract
The prevalence of dietary supplement use varies largely among populations, and previous studies have indicated that it is high in the Danish population compared with other European countries. The diversity in supplement use across countries indicates that cultural and environmental factors could influence the use of dietary supplements. Only few studies investigating the use of dietary supplements have been conducted in the Danish population. The present cross-sectional study is based on 54,948 Danes, aged 50-64 years, who completed self-administrated questionnaires on diet, dietary supplements and lifestyle between 1993 and 1997. A health index including smoking, physical activity, alcohol and diet, and a metabolic risk index including waist circumference, urinary glucose and measured hypertension were constructed. Logistic regression was used to investigate these determinants in relation to the intake of dietary supplements. We found that 71 % of the participants were dietary supplement users; female sex, older age groups and higher educated participants were more likely to be users of any dietary supplements. One additional point in the health index was associated with 19, 16 and 9 % higher likelihood of being user of any, more common and less common supplements, respectively. In the metabolic risk index, one additional point was associated with 17 and 16 % lower likelihood of being user of any supplement and more common supplements, respectively. No significant association was found for less common supplement use. In conclusion, those with the healthiest lifestyle were more likely to use dietary supplements. Thus, lifestyle and dietary composition should be considered as confounders on supplement use and health outcomes.
PubMed ID
25940747 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of a healthy Nordic diet on gene expression changes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to an oral glucose tolerance test in subjects with metabolic syndrome: a SYSDIET sub-study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274894
Source
Genes Nutr. 2016;11:3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Lena Leder
Marjukka Kolehmainen
Ingunn Narverud
Ingrid Dahlman
Mari C W Myhrstad
Vanessa D de Mello
Jussi Paananen
Carsten Carlberg
Ursula Schwab
Karl-Heinz Herzig
Lieselotte Cloetens
Matilda Ulmius Storm
Janne Hukkanen
Markku J Savolainen
Fredrik Rosqvist
Kjeld Hermansen
Lars O Dragsted
Ingibjörg Gunnarsdottir
Inga Thorsdottir
Ulf Risérus
Björn Åkesson
Magne Thoresen
Peter Arner
Kaisa S Poutanen
Matti Uusitupa
Kirsten B Holven
Stine M Ulven
Source
Genes Nutr. 2016;11:3
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Diet has a great impact on the risk of developing features of metabolic syndrome (MetS), type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). We evaluated whether a long-term healthy Nordic diet (ND) can modify the expression of inflammation and lipid metabolism-related genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) during a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in individuals with MetS.
A Nordic multicenter randomized dietary study included subjects (n?=?213) with MetS, randomized to a ND group or a control diet (CD) group applying an isocaloric study protocol. In this sub-study, we included subjects (n?=?89) from three Nordic centers: Kuopio (n?=?26), Lund (n?=?30), and Oulu (n?=?33) with a maximum weight change of ±4 kg, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration =10 mg L(-1), and baseline body mass index
PubMed ID
27482295 View in PubMed
Less detail

Fruit and vegetable intake and risk of acute coronary syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99436
Source
Br J Nutr. 2010 Jul;104(2):248-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Louise Hansen
Lars O Dragsted
Anja Olsen
Jane Christensen
Anne Tjønneland
Erik B Schmidt
Kim Overvad
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Strandboulevarden 49, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. louhan@cancer.dk
Source
Br J Nutr. 2010 Jul;104(2):248-55
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet
Female
Fruit
Humans
Male
Malus
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
Prospective epidemiological studies have reported that a higher fruit and vegetable intake is associated with a lower risk of CHD. The aim of the present study was to examine associations between fruit and vegetable consumption, in particular the subgroupings citrus fruits, apples and cruciferous vegetables, and the risk of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). During a median follow-up of 7.7 years, 1075 incident ACS cases were identified among 53 383 men and women, aged 50-64 years at recruitment into the Diet, Cancer and Health cohort study in 1993-7. Fruit and vegetable intake was estimated from a validated FFQ, and ACS incidence rate ratios (IRR) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Overall, a tendency towards a lower risk of ACS was observed for both men and women with higher fruit and vegetable consumption. For men, we found an inverse association for apple intake (IRR per 25 g/d: 0.97; 95 % CI 0.94, 0.99). This association was also seen among women, albeit borderline significant. However, a higher risk was seen among women with higher fruit juice intake (IRR per 25 g/d: 1.04; 95 % CI 1.00, 1.08). The present results provide some support for previously observed inverse associations between fresh fruit intake, particularly apples, and ACS risk.
PubMed ID
20178672 View in PubMed
Less detail

Healthy Nordic diet downregulates the expression of genes involved in inflammation in subcutaneous adipose tissue in individuals with features of the metabolic syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258515
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2015 Jan;101(1):228-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Marjukka Kolehmainen
Stine M Ulven
Jussi Paananen
Vanessa de Mello
Ursula Schwab
Carsten Carlberg
Mari Myhrstad
Jussi Pihlajamäki
Elisabeth Dungner
Eva Sjölin
Ingibjörg Gunnarsdottir
Lieselotte Cloetens
Mona Landin-Olsson
Björn Akesson
Fredrik Rosqvist
Janne Hukkanen
Karl-Heinz Herzig
Lars O Dragsted
Markku J Savolainen
Lea Brader
Kjeld Hermansen
Ulf Risérus
Inga Thorsdottir
Kaisa S Poutanen
Matti Uusitupa
Peter Arner
Ingrid Dahlman
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2015 Jan;101(1):228-39
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Previously, a healthy Nordic diet (ND) has been shown to have beneficial health effects close to those of Mediterranean diets.
The objective was to explore whether the ND has an impact on gene expression in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and whether changes in gene expression are associated with clinical and biochemical effects.
Obese adults with features of the metabolic syndrome underwent an 18- to 24-wk randomized intervention study comparing the ND with the control diet (CD) (the SYSDIET study, carried out within Nordic Centre of Excellence of the Systems Biology in Controlled Dietary Interventions and Cohort Studies). The present study included participants from 3 Nordic SYSDIET centers [Kuopio (n = 20), Lund (n = 18), and Oulu (n = 18)] with a maximum weight change of ?4 kg, highly sensitive C-reactive protein concentration
PubMed ID
25527767 View in PubMed
Less detail

Intake of dietary fiber, especially from cereal foods, is associated with lower incidence of colon cancer in the HELGA cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131882
Source
Int J Cancer. 2012 Jul 15;131(2):469-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2012
Author
Louise Hansen
Guri Skeie
Rikard Landberg
Eiliv Lund
Richard Palmqvist
Ingegerd Johansson
Lars O Dragsted
Rikke Egeberg
Nina F Johnsen
Jane Christensen
Kim Overvad
Anne Tjønneland
Anja Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen, Denmark. louhan@cancer.dk
Source
Int J Cancer. 2012 Jul 15;131(2):469-78
Date
Jul-15-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cereals
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Eating
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Risk factors
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
The role of dietary fiber on the risk of colon and rectal cancer has been investigated in numerous studies, but findings have been inconsistent. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between intake of dietary fiber and risk of incident colon (including distal and proximal colon) and rectal cancer in the prospective Scandinavian HELGA cohort and to determine if fiber source (vegetables, fruits, potatoes, cereals) impacted the association. We included 1,168 incident cases (691 colon, 477 rectal cancer), diagnosed during a median of 11.3 years, among 108,081 cohort members. Sex-specific incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of colon and rectal cancer were related to intake of total or specific fiber source using Cox proportional hazards models. For men, an inverse association was observed between intake of total fiber and the risk of colon cancer per an incremental increase of 10 g day(-1) , IRR (95% CI): 0.74 (0.64-0.86). Intake of cereal fiber per 2 g day(-1) was associated with an IRR of 0.94 (0.91-0.98), which was also seen for intake of cereal fiber from foods with high fiber content (= 5 g per 100 g product), where the IRR per 2 g day(-1) was 0.94 (0.90-0.98). In women, intake of cereal fiber per 2 g day(-1) was also associated with lower risk of colon cancer, 0.97 (0.93-1.00). No clear associations were seen for rectal cancer. Our data indicate a protective role of total and cereal fiber intake, particularly from cereal foods with high fiber content, in the prevention of colon cancer.
PubMed ID
21866547 View in PubMed
Less detail

Intake of vitamins A, C, and E from diet and supplements and breast cancer in postmenopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18035
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2003 Oct;14(8):695-704
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Stine B Nissen
Anne Tjønneland
Connie Stripp
Anja Olsen
Jane Christensen
Kim Overvad
Lars O Dragsted
Birthe Thomsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Denmark.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2003 Oct;14(8):695-704
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet
Dietary Supplements - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Postmenopause
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Vitamin A - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Vitamin E - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Vitamins - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The influence of the vitamins A, C, and E on breast cancer development has not been clarified. An effect of a vitamin per se implicates similar patterns for the effects of the vitamin from dietary and supplemental sources. We examined how the breast cancer incidence rate among postmenopausal women was related to intake of vitamins A, C, and E from diet and supplements. METHODS: Data was sampled as case-control nested within the Danish 'Diet, Cancer and Health' cohort. Data on vitamin intakes were collected at entry into the cohort by means of self-administered questionnaires. Women eligible for the nested case-control study were postmenopausal at entry into the cohort. The analyses were based on 418 cases of incident breast cancer and 394 controls (including two cases). RESULTS: Breast cancer was not significantly related to the intakes of vitamin A or E, whereas a monotonic dose-response relation was seen for the intake of vitamin C. The estimated rate ratio per 100 mg vitamin C was: 2.06 (95% CI: 1.45-2.91) for dietary intake and 1.06 (95% CI: 1.01-1.13) for supplemental intake. CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence of an association between breast cancer and intake of vitamin A or E for postmenopausal women. For vitamin C we found an increase in breast cancer rate with increasing intake.
PubMed ID
14674733 View in PubMed
Less detail

18 records – page 1 of 2.