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A 2-year follow-up study of people with severe mental illness involved in psychosocial rehabilitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257843
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;68(6):401-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Petra Svedberg
Bengt Svensson
Lars Hansson
Henrika Jormfeldt
Author Affiliation
Petra Svedberg, Associate Professor, School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University , Sweden.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;68(6):401-8
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Mental health services
Middle Aged
Power (Psychology)
Prospective Studies
Psychotherapy - methods
Quality of Life
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUNDS. A focus on psychiatric rehabilitation in order to support recovery among persons with severe mental illness (SMI) has been given great attention in research and mental health policy, but less impact on clinical practice. Despite the potential impact of psychiatric rehabilitation on health and wellbeing, there is a lack of research regarding the model called the Psychiatric Rehabilitation Approach from Boston University (BPR).
The aim was to investigate the outcome of the BPR intervention regarding changes in life situation, use of healthcare services, quality of life, health, psychosocial functioning and empowerment.
The study has a prospective longitudinal design and the setting was seven mental health services who worked with the BPR in the county of Halland in Sweden. In total, 71 clients completed the assessment at baseline and of these 49 completed the 2-year follow-up assessments.
The most significant finding was an improved psychosocial functioning at the follow-up assessment. Furthermore, 65% of the clients reported that they had mainly or almost completely achieved their self-formulated rehabilitation goals at the 2-year follow-up. There were significant differences with regard to health, empowerment, quality of life and psychosocial functioning for those who reported that they had mainly/completely had achieved their self-formulated rehabilitation goals compared to those who reported that they only had to a small extent or not at all reached their goals.
Our results indicate that the BPR approach has impact on clients' health, empowerment, quality of life and in particular concerning psychosocial functioning.
PubMed ID
24228778 View in PubMed
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Appraisal of caregiving, burden and psychological distress in relatives of psychiatric inpatients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45765
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2004 Nov;19(7):402-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Margareta Ostman
Lars Hansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, Lund University, University Hospital 221 85 Lund, Sweden. margareta.ostman@hs.mah.se
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2004 Nov;19(7):402-7
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Caregivers - psychology
Cost of Illness
Depression - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Patient Admission
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Appraisal of caregiving and its relationship to family burden and experienced mental health problems in the relatives were investigated as part of a multi-centre study of the quality of mental health services in Sweden performed in 1997. The sample was drawn from relatives of involuntarily and voluntarily admitted patients to acute psychiatric wards. The instrument used was a semi-structured questionnaire, interviewing relatives about the burden, experience of mental health problems and appraisal of the caregiving situation. The results showed a high proportion of relatives engaged in caregiving activities on a daily basis the month before the patient's admission to hospital and a high proportion of relatives appraising the caregiving activities negatively. The burden was more extensive if the relative and the patient were living together, had a longer duration of their relationship, if the relative was rendering caregiving on a daily basis and if the relative appraised caregiving negatively. The relatives' psychological distress was not related to their negative appraisal of caregiving, nor was patient characteristics, such as diagnosis and level of psychosocial functioning. The only factor found to influence the relatives' psychological distress was the duration of relationship to the patient. Interventions reducing psychological distress for relatives who have known the patients for more than 20 years, who live with the patient, who give care on a daily basis and who appraise their caregiving negatively are suggested.
PubMed ID
15504646 View in PubMed
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Assessing movement quality in persons with severe mental illness - Reliability and validity of the Body Awareness Scale Movement Quality and Experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281756
Source
Physiother Theory Pract. 2016 May;32(4):296-306
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Lena Hedlund
Amanda Lundvik Gyllensten
Tomas Waldegren
Lars Hansson
Source
Physiother Theory Pract. 2016 May;32(4):296-306
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Awareness
Bipolar Disorder - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology
Body Image
Checklist
Cognition
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health status
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Motor Disorders - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology
Muscle Fatigue
Observer Variation
Physical Examination
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - physiopathology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Self Concept
Severity of Illness Index
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Motor disturbances and disturbed self-recognition are common features that affect mobility in persons with schizophrenia spectrum disorder and bipolar disorder. Physiotherapists in Scandinavia assess and treat movement difficulties in persons with severe mental illness. The Body Awareness Scale Movement Quality and Experience (BAS MQ-E) is a new and shortened version of the commonly used Body Awareness Scale-Health (BAS-H). The purpose of this study was to investigate the inter-rater reliability and the concurrent validity of BAS MQ-E in persons with severe mental illness. The concurrent validity was examined by investigating the relationships between neurological soft signs, alexithymia, fatigue, anxiety, and mastery. Sixty-two persons with severe mental illness participated in the study. The results showed a satisfactory inter-rater reliability (n = 53) and a concurrent validity (n = 62) with neurological soft signs, especially cognitive and perceptual based signs. There was also a concurrent validity linked to physical fatigue and aspects of alexithymia. The scores of BAS MQ-E were in general higher for persons with schizophrenia compared to persons with other diagnoses within the schizophrenia spectrum disorders and bipolar disorder. The clinical implications are presented in the discussion.
PubMed ID
27050236 View in PubMed
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The attitudes of patients and staff towards aspects of health promotion interventions in mental health services in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150313
Source
Health Promot Int. 2009 Sep;24(3):269-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Petra Svedberg
Lars Hansson
Bengt Svensson
Author Affiliation
School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden. petra.svedberg@lthalland.se
Source
Health Promot Int. 2009 Sep;24(3):269-76
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Medical Staff - psychology
Mental health services
Middle Aged
Patients - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The present study investigates attitudes towards aspects of health promotion in mental health services, as rated by patients and staff. The aim of the study was to investigate similarities and differences in attitudes towards health promotion interventions among patients and staff in mental health services, using a newly developed questionnaire, the Health Promotion Intervention Questionnaire (HPIQ). The study has a cross-sectional design and a sample of 141 patients and 140 staff were recruited to the study. The response rate was 59% for the patients and 50% for the staff. The participants were asked to rate the attitudes of the 19 items included in the HPIQ. The result showed that patients and staff in some cases share similar attitudes regarding aspects of health promotion intervention. According to both groups, empowerment is the most important intervention in health promotion. Significant differences between the ratings of patients and staff appeared regarding all subscales of HPIQ. Patients rated alliance and educational support significantly higher than staff and staff-rated empowerment and practical support significantly higher than patients. Based on these findings, it is of importance to meet patients' desire for information and knowledge in an interactive manner with an empowerment approach to promote health in mental health services.
PubMed ID
19525504 View in PubMed
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Attitudes towards mental illness among health care students at Swedish universities--a follow-up study after completed clinical placement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152070
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2009 Aug;29(6):660-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Urban Markström
Amanda Lundvik Gyllensten
Ulrika Bejerholm
Tommy Björkman
David Brunt
Lars Hansson
Christel Leufstadius
Mikael Sandlund
Bengt Svensson
Margareta Ostman
Mona Eklund
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Work, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. urban.markstrom@socw.umu.se
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2009 Aug;29(6):660-5
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Attitude of Health Personnel
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - therapy
Middle Aged
Preceptorship - statistics & numerical data
Prejudice
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Students, Health Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the study was to examine the changes in attitudes towards mental illness after theoretical education and clinical placement among students from university programmes preparing for different kinds of health professions. Three different questionnaires were used, measuring the level of familiarity with mental illness and attitudes towards mental illness in general and towards specific mental illnesses. The data were collected on two occasions, before the theoretical course and after the completed clinical placement. The result showed that the attitudes toward mental illness in general had changed in a less stigmatising direction after the clinical placement. On the other hand, attitudes toward specific mental illnesses did not show any major changes. A conclusion is that the clinical placement included in the university programmes to some extent could affect attitudes in a de-stigmatizing direction, possibly because of the interaction with persons suffering from mental illness and experienced supervisors.
PubMed ID
19286287 View in PubMed
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Children in families with a severely mentally ill member. Prevalence and needs for support.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31477
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2002 May;37(5):243-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
Margareta Ostman
Lars Hansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, University Hospital, 22185 Lund, Sweden.
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2002 May;37(5):243-8
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Cost of Illness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Personality Development
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Adjustment
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The prevalence of minor children in families with a severely mentally ill member, these children's needs for support and the situation of the spouses were investigated as part of a multi-centre study of the quality of the mental health services in Sweden performed in 1986, 1991 and 1997. METHODS: The sample was drawn from relatives of compulsorily and voluntarily admitted inpatients to acute psychiatric wards. The instrument used was a semi-structured questionnaire, interviewing relatives about the burden of relatives, their needs for support and participation in care and items concerning the situation of the under-aged children in these families. RESULTS: The results over the years investigated showed the same proportion of patients admitted to hospital who were also parents to minor children and a decreasing proportion of patients who had the custody of their children. Female patients were more often a parent and also more often had the custody of the children. The majority of the children had needs for support caused by their parent's illness and these needs were met in half of the cases. The healthy spouses in families with minor children more often had to give up their own occupation and to a higher extent experienced own needs for care and support from psychiatric services compared to spouses without minor children. CONCLUSIONS: The study supports that there is an urgent need for the psychiatric services to initiate parental issues in programmes for treatment and rehabilitation to ensure that the specific needs of minor children are met.
PubMed ID
12107717 View in PubMed
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Clients' experiences of the Boston Psychiatric Rehabilitation Approach: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256774
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2014;9:22916
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Henrika Jormfeldt
Bengt Svensson
Lars Hansson
Petra Svedberg
Author Affiliation
School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden; henrika.jormfeldt@hh.se.
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2014;9:22916
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Goals
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Interviews as Topic - methods
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Mental health services
Patient satisfaction
Qualitative Research
Self Concept
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Trust
Young Adult
Abstract
The Boston Psychiatric Rehabilitation Approach (BPR) is person-centered and characterized by being based entirely on the individual's unique needs and preferences in the areas of working, learning, social contacts, and living environment. Nevertheless, the person-centered approach is lacking firm evidence regarding outcomes, and empirical studies regarding clients' experiences of this particular model are needed. A qualitative content analysis of 10 transcribed semistructured individual interviews was used to describe and explore clients' experiences of the BPR during an implementation project in Sweden. The findings from the interviews could be summarized in "A sense of being in communion with self and others" theme, consisting of three categories: increased self-understanding, getting new perspectives, and being in a trusting relationship. The results showed that clients do not always recognize nor are able to verbalize their goals before they have been given the possibility to reflect their thoughts in collaboration with a trusted person. The guidelines of the approach are intended to support the clients' ability to participate in decision making regarding their own care. More research about efficacy of different rehabilitation approaches and exploration of fidelity to guidelines of rehabilitation programs are required.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24717265 View in PubMed
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Clinical and social changes in severely mentally ill individuals admitted to an outpatient psychosis team: an 18-month follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71427
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2003 Mar;17(1):3-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Anita Bengtsson-Tops
Lars Hansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Kristianland University, Sweden. anita.bengtsson.tops@staff.hkr.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2003 Mar;17(1):3-11
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Ambulatory Care - organization & administration
Attitude to Health
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Schizophrenia - therapy
Schizophrenic Psychology
Severity of Illness Index
Social Behavior
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
AIM: The study investigated clinical and social changes during an 18-month follow-up period in a group (n = 76) of schizophrenic outpatients admitted to a newly implemented outpatient psychosis team. Changes related to level of contact with the psychosis team were also examined as well as aspects of the content of the treatment interventions and work situation from a staff perspective. METHODS: Structured face-to-face interviews with the patients were performed at baseline and after 18 months. The Camberwell Assessment of Need instrument, the Lancashire Quality of Life Profile and the Interview Schedule for Social Interaction were used on both interview occasions along with Global Assessment of Functioning Scale and Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale. Thematic open-ended questions were used in staff interviews. RESULTS: Psychiatric symptoms, number of needs and number of met needs decreased, and perceived quality of life improved for the total sample during the follow-up period. Patients only in contact with a psychiatrist in the psychosis team improved more in symptoms and spent fewer days in hospital during follow-up time compared with those who had combined psychiatric and supportive contacts, and were also more satisfied with their medication. Patients with a combined contact deteriorated in psychosocial functioning compared with the group only in contact with a psychiatrist. Some of the elements in treatment interventions and work situation as well as hindrances in providing community-based care adapted to the patients' needs were identified. CONCLUSIONS: Community-based psychiatric services, to a larger extent, need to embrace evidence-based interventions and to perform regular, structured and comprehensive need assessments in order to ensure the effectiveness of interventions. Attention should be paid to staff motivation and education as well as to providing practical guidelines, supervision and support.
PubMed ID
12581289 View in PubMed
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A comparison of the psychosocial environment of two types of residences for persons with severe mental illness: small congregate community residences and psychiatric inpatient settings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71446
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2002 Dec;48(4):243-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
David Brunt
Lars Hansson
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Sweden. david.brunt@ivosa.vxu.se
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2002 Dec;48(4):243-52
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Personnel
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - rehabilitation
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residential Treatment
Severity of Illness Index
Social Environment
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Legislation was passed in Sweden to stimulate the development of different housing solutions for persons suffering from severe mental illness. Among these solutions are small congregate residences built in the community to provide suitable housing and support for those not able or willing to live independently. AIMS: The general aim of the present study was to compare the psychosocial environment of two types of residences for the persons with severe mental illness - congregate community residences and psychiatric inpatient settings. A specific aim was to see if the former provided higher levels of autonomy than the latter. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study the real version of the Community Oriented Program Environmental Scale (COPES) was administered to residents, patients and staff members. RESULTS: The study showed that the psychosocial environment differs between the two types of settings. Residents and staff in small congregate residences rated higher levels of Autonomy and lower levels of Practical Orientation, Anger and Aggression and Order and Organisation than patients and staff in inpatient settings. CONCLUSIONS: The psychosocial environment profiles for psychiatric settings in different phases of the care process may vary in terms of the aforementioned subscales.
PubMed ID
12553405 View in PubMed
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Differences in self-reported importance of elements of health and subjectively experienced health among outpatients in community mental health services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130679
Source
Arch Psychiatr Nurs. 2011 Oct;25(5):e19-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Henrika Jormfeldt
Lars Hansson
Bengt Svensson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. Henrika.Jormfeldt@hh.se
Source
Arch Psychiatr Nurs. 2011 Oct;25(5):e19-26
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Community Mental Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Outpatients - psychology
Self-Assessment
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Positive dimensions of mental health are strong protective factors against physical and mental illness in general population. A cross-sectional study including a randomly selected sample of 141 outpatients was performed to explore differences in patients' self-reported importance of elements of health and subjective experiences of health related to sociodemographic background variables. The examination of differences in self-reported importance of elements of health showed differences regarding gender, and the analyses of subjectively experienced health showed differences regarding age and diagnosis. Clinical interventions aiming at strengthening positive dimensions of health are required in community mental health services to meet the patients' individual needs of enhanced health.
PubMed ID
21978810 View in PubMed
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33 records – page 1 of 4.