Skip header and navigation

Refine By

46 records – page 1 of 5.

Cancer risk in Norwegian world class athletes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142895
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2010 Oct;21(10):1711-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Trude Eid Robsahm
Unn Elisabet Hestvik
Marit Bragelien Veierød
Arne Fagerlie
Wenche Nystad
Lars Engebretsen
Steinar Tretli
Author Affiliation
The Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-Based Cancer Research, Oslo, Norway. trude.eid.robsahm@kreftregisteret.no
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2010 Oct;21(10):1711-9
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Athletes - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk
Young Adult
Abstract
Physical activity appears to be inversely related to cancer risk, although the evidence is convincing for colon cancer only. As physical activity levels are difficult to measure in the general population, we aimed to investigate how physical activity influences cancer risk using a cohort of Norwegian world class athletes.
The cohort includes 3,428 athletes. Individual questionnaires gave information about physical activity and lifestyle variables until attained age. To elucidate the level of cancer risk, groups of athletes were compared to the general population (external comparisons) and to each other (internal comparisons).
A slightly reduced risk of total cancer was observed in the cohort of athletes, but stronger effects were observed for subgroups. The risk reduction was most pronounced for lung cancer and for leukemia/lymphoma. In women, a threefold increased risk of thyroid cancer was observed.
This cohort of athletes seems to have a reduced risk of cancer. The beneficial association, however, is weak and may be attributed to healthy lifestyle as well as to physical activity. Prolonged strenuous exercise may also increase the risk of thyroid cancer in women.
PubMed ID
20544266 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical, functional, and radiologic outcome in team handball players 6 to 11 years after anterior cruciate ligament injury: a follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182777
Source
Am J Sports Med. 2003 Nov-Dec;31(6):981-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Grethe Myklebust
Inger Holm
Sverre Maehlum
Lars Engebretsen
Roald Bahr
Author Affiliation
Oslo Sport Trauma Research Center, University of Sport and Physical Education, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Am J Sports Med. 2003 Nov-Dec;31(6):981-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Anterior Cruciate Ligament - injuries - radiography - surgery
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Norway
Prospective Studies
Recovery of Function
Rupture
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Long-term outcome after anterior cruciate ligament injury among top-level pivoting athletes is unknown.
To evaluate outcome among competitive team handball players after anterior cruciate ligament injury.
Prospective cohort study.
A previously studied group of 86 elite players who had an anterior cruciate ligament rupture were invited to participate in follow-up evaluations a mean of 7.8 years later.
Among the 57 operatively treated patients who returned for follow-up, 33 (58%) returned to team handball at their preinjury level, compared with 18 of 22 (82%) in the nonoperative group. Eleven of the 50 players (22%) who continued playing reinjured their anterior cruciate ligament when playing team handball. The overall Lysholm score was 85 +/- 13 in both groups, but the five players classified as poor were all operatively treated. Nearly half of the players had an International Knee Documentation Committee classification of abnormal or severely abnormal. There were significant differences between the injured and uninjured leg in functional (2.5% to 8%), strength (3.8% to 10.1%), and KT-1000 arthrometer tests (27%). In the operatively treated group, 11 developed radiologic gonarthrosis, compared with 6 in the nonoperatively treated group. There was no correlation between radiologic findings and pain scores.
A more restrictive attitude regarding return to competitive pivoting sports after anterior cruciate ligament injury may be warranted.
PubMed ID
14623667 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Clinical use of COX inhibitors--a consensus]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29180
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Feb 23;126(5):591-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-23-2006
Author
Asmund Reikvam
Sofie Hexeberg
Tore Kristian Kvien
Lars Slørdal
Lars Aabakken
Lars Engebretsen
Berit Flatø
Njål Idsø
Villy Johnsen
Synnøve Kalstad
Steinar Madsen
Knut Mikkelsen
Ingrid Os
Johan REder
Author Affiliation
Institutt for farmakoterapi, Universitetet i Oslo, Postboks 1065 Blindern, 0316 Oslo. asmund.reikvam@medisin.uio.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Feb 23;126(5):591-5
Date
Feb-23-2006
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - chemically induced
Child
Chronic Disease
Comorbidity
Consensus
Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors - administration & dosage - adverse effects - contraindications
Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors - administration & dosage - adverse effects - contraindications
English Abstract
Gastrointestinal Diseases - chemically induced
Humans
Musculoskeletal Diseases - drug therapy
Norway
Practice Guidelines
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Many physicians have been uncertain about treatment options following reports that linked cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors to serious cardiovascular events and the subsequent withdrawal of two selective COX-2 inhibitors. Therefore, on June 14, 2005, the Norwegian Medicines Agency and the Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, University of Oslo, held an expert meeting on COX inhibitors. METHODS: Presentations and discussions based on existing literature and statements from European (EMEA) and American (FDA) medicine authorities. This constitutes the basis for the current recommendations. RESULTS AND INTERPRETATION: COX inhibitors have solely symptomatic effects, and there are no differences in analgesic and anti-inflammatory efficacy between the various COX-inhibitors. These drugs should, if possible, be used at the lowest effective dose and for as short a time as possible. Some of the COX-2 selective inhibitors show a lower incidence of gastrointestinal side effects than unselective COX inhibitors, but this advantage can be outweighed by increased occurrence of cardiovascular side effects. Generally, the cardiovascular adverse effects are more serious, and more often irreversible, than the gastrointestinal adverse effects. Patients with established or increased risk of cardiovascular disease should not use COX-2-selective inhibitors. In general, COX inhibitors should, if possible, not be administered to individuals with previous peptic ulcer disease, hypertension, heart failure, or kidney disease. There is a need for more data on the effect and safety of COX inhibitors.
PubMed ID
16505867 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of community-based ACL reconstruction registries in the U.S. and Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127743
Source
J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2011 Dec 21;93 Suppl 3:31-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-21-2011
Author
Gregory B Maletis
Lars-Petter Granan
Maria C S Inacio
Tadashi T Funahashi
Lars Engebretsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Kaiser Permanente Baldwin Park, Southern California Permanente Medical Group, 1011 Baldwin Park Boulevard, Baldwin Park, CA 91706, USA.
Source
J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2011 Dec 21;93 Suppl 3:31-6
Date
Dec-21-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anterior Cruciate Ligament - injuries - surgery
Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction - methods - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
International Cooperation
Knee Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Product Surveillance, Postmarketing - statistics & numerical data
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Reoperation - statistics & numerical data
Treatment Outcome
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Joint registries have demonstrated value as a resource for the study of large numbers of patients, providing the opportunity to study rare occurrences and identify early failures of surgical procedures. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction registries have been established in Norway and the U.S. In this study, we compared the preoperative characteristics of the Norwegian National Knee Ligament Registry (NKLR) and the Kaiser Permanente Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Registry (KP ACLRR) cohorts.
A cross-sectional comparison of the NKLR and KP ACLRR cohorts registered between 2005 and 2010 was performed. Aggregate level data including preoperative patient characteristics, mechanisms of injury, preoperative Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), intraoperative findings, and adjusted revision rates were shared between the two registries, and a descriptive analysis was conducted.
During the study period, 10,468 primary ACL reconstructions were entered in the NKLR and 10,394, in the KP ACLRR. The age at the time of surgery was similar between the two cohorts (twenty-seven years in the NKLR versus twenty-eight years in the KP ACLRR), although the KP ACLRR had a higher proportion of males (65% versus 58%, p < 0.001). The revision rate per follow-up year was 0.9% in the NKLR and 1.5% in the KP ACLRR. Soccer was the most common mechanism of injury in both registries (40.0% in the NKLR and 26.6% in the KP ACLRR). The preoperative KOOS was statistically different, but the difference was not clinically relevant (defined as a change of >10 points). A higher prevalence of meniscal tears was seen in the KP ACLRR (61% versus 49%, p < 0.001).
Baseline findings are so congruent between the NKLR and the KP ACLRR cohorts that comparisons between these two registries will likely provide information to the orthopaedic community that can be generalized.
PubMed ID
22262420 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effect of gender and sports on the risk of full-thickness articular cartilage lesions in anterior cruciate ligament-injured knees: a nationwide cohort study from Sweden and Norway of 15 783 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133190
Source
Am J Sports Med. 2011 Jul;39(7):1387-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Jan Harald Røtterud
Einar A Sivertsen
Magnus Forssblad
Lars Engebretsen
Asbjørn Årøen
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Akershus University Hospital,Lørenskog, Norway. janhrot@medisin.uio.no
Source
Am J Sports Med. 2011 Jul;39(7):1387-94
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anterior Cruciate Ligament - injuries - surgery
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology
Cartilage, Articular - injuries - pathology
Child
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Knee Injuries - epidemiology
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sports
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The presence of an articular cartilage lesion in anterior cruciate ligament-injured knees is considered a predictor of osteoarthritis.
This study was undertaken to evaluate risk factors for full-thickness articular cartilage lesions in anterior cruciate ligament-injured knees, in particular the role of gender and the sport causing the initial injury.
Cohort study (prognosis); Level of evidence, 2.
Primary unilateral anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions prospectively registered in the Swedish and the Norwegian National Knee Ligament Registry during 2005 through 2008 were included (N = 15 783). Logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate risk factors for cartilage lesions.
A total of 1012 patients (6.4%) had full-thickness cartilage lesions. The median time from injury to surgery was 9 months (range, 0 days-521 months). Male patients had an increased odds of full-thickness cartilage lesions compared with females (odds ratio = 1.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.42). In males, team handball had an increase in the odds of full-thickness cartilage lesions compared with soccer (odds ratio = 2.36; 95% confidence interval, 1.33-4.19). Among female patients, no sport investigated showed a significant decrease or increase in the odds of full-thickness cartilage lesions. The odds of a full-thickness cartilage lesion increased by 1.006 (95% confidence interval, 1.005-1.008) for each month elapsed from time of injury until anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction when all patients were considered, while time from injury to surgery did not affect the odds significantly in those patients reconstructed within 1 year of injury (odds ratio = 0.98; 95% confidence interval, 0.95-1.02). Previous surgery increased the odds of having a full-thickness cartilage lesion (odds ratio = 1.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.21-1.63). One year of increasing patient age also increased the odds (odds ratio = 1.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.06).
Male gender is associated with an increased risk of full-thickness articular cartilage lesions in anterior cruciate ligament-injured knees. Male team handball players had an increased risk of full-thickness lesions. No other sports investigated were found to have significant effect on the risk in either gender. Furthermore, age, previous surgery, and time from injury to surgery exceeding 12 months are risk factors for full-thickness cartilage lesions.
PubMed ID
21730206 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effect of meniscal and focal cartilage lesions on patient-reported outcome after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a nationwide cohort study from Norway and Sweden of 8476 patients with 2-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116698
Source
Am J Sports Med. 2013 Mar;41(3):535-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Jan Harald Røtterud
Einar A Sivertsen
Magnus Forssblad
Lars Engebretsen
Asbjørn Arøen
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway. janhrot@medisin.uio.no
Source
Am J Sports Med. 2013 Mar;41(3):535-43
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction
Cartilage, Articular - injuries - surgery
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Menisci, Tibial - injuries - surgery
Norway
Pain Measurement
Quality of Life
Registries
Sweden
Abstract
The effect of concomitant intra-articular injury on patient-reported outcome after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is debated.
To evaluate the effect of meniscal and articular cartilage lesions on patient-reported outcome 2 years after ACL reconstruction.
Cohort study (prognosis); Level of evidence, 2.
The study included all patients with primary, unilateral ACL reconstruction registered in the Norwegian and the Swedish National Knee Ligament Registry from 2005 through 2008 who had completed the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) Knee-Related Quality of Life subscale at a 2-year follow-up (mean ± SD, 2.1 ± 0.2 years) after surgery (n = 8476). Multiple linear regression analyses were used to evaluate the associations between each KOOS subscale (Pain, Other Symptoms, Activities of Daily Living, Sport and Recreation Function, Knee-Related Quality of Life) as the measure for patient-reported outcome and meniscal and cartilage lesions.
A total of 3674 (43%) patients had meniscal lesion(s), 1671 (20%) had partial-thickness (International Cartilage Repair Society [ICRS] grades 1-2) cartilage lesion(s), and 551 (7%) had full-thickness (ICRS grades 3-4) cartilage lesion(s). Multiple linear regression analyses detected no significant associations between meniscal lesions or partial-thickness cartilage lesions and the scores in any of the KOOS subscales at the 2-year follow-up. Full-thickness cartilage lesions were significantly associated with decreased scores in all of the KOOS subscales.
Patients with concomitant full-thickness cartilage lesions reported worse outcome in all of the KOOS subscales compared with patients without cartilage lesions 2 years after ACL reconstruction. Meniscal lesions and partial-thickness cartilage lesions did not impair patient-reported outcome 2 years after ACL reconstruction.
PubMed ID
23371474 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effect on Patient-Reported Outcomes of Debridement or Microfracture of Concomitant Full-Thickness Cartilage Lesions in Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Reconstructed Knees: A Nationwide Cohort Study From Norway and Sweden of 357 Patients With 2-Year Follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276778
Source
Am J Sports Med. 2016 Feb;44(2):337-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Jan Harald Røtterud
Einar Andreas Sivertsen
Magnus Forssblad
Lars Engebretsen
Asbjørn Årøen
Source
Am J Sports Med. 2016 Feb;44(2):337-44
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Anterior Cruciate Ligament - injuries - surgery
Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction - methods
Cartilage, Articular - injuries - surgery
Cohort Studies
Debridement - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Cartilage - epidemiology - pathology
Humans
Knee Injuries - epidemiology - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Outcome Assessment
Quality of Life
Registries
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The treatment of concomitant cartilage lesions in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-injured knees is debatable.
To evaluate the effect of debridement or microfracture (MF) compared with no treatment of concomitant full-thickness (International Cartilage Repair Society [ICRS] grades 3-4) cartilage lesions on patient-reported outcomes after ACL reconstruction.
Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2.
Six hundred forty-four patients who underwent primary unilateral ACL reconstruction and had a concomitant full-thickness cartilage lesion treated simultaneously by debridement (n = 129) or MF (n = 164), or underwent no treatment (n = 351) of the cartilage lesion, registered in the Norwegian and Swedish National Knee Ligament Registries from 2005 to 2008 were included. The Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) was used to measure patient-reported outcomes. At a mean follow-up of 2.1 ± 0.2 years after surgery, 357 (55%) patients completed the KOOS. Linear regression analyses were used to evaluate the effect of debridement or MF on the KOOS.
No significant effects of debridement were detected in the unadjusted or adjusted regression analyses on any of the KOOS subscales at 2-year follow-up. The MF treatment of the cartilage lesions had significant negative effects at 2-year follow-up on the KOOS Sport and Recreation (Sport/Rec) (regression coefficient [ß] = -8.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], -15.1 to -1.5) and Knee-Related Quality of Life (QoL) (ß = -8.1; 95% CI, -14.1 to -2.1) subscales in the unadjusted analyses. When adjusting for confounders, MF had significant negative effects on the same KOOS subscales of Sport/Rec (ß = -8.6; 95% CI, -16.4 to -0.7) and QoL (ß = -7.2; 95% CI, -13.6 to -0.8). For the remaining KOOS subscales of Pain, Symptoms, and Activities of Daily Living, there were no significant unadjusted or adjusted effects of MF.
MF of concomitant full-thickness cartilage lesions showed adverse effects on patient-reported outcomes at 2-year follow-up after ACL reconstruction. Debridement of concomitant full-thickness cartilage lesions showed neither positive nor negative effects on patient-reported outcomes at 2-year follow-up after ACL reconstruction.
PubMed ID
26657851 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exercises to prevent lower limb injuries in youth sports: cluster randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49633
Source
BMJ. 2005 Feb 26;330(7489):449
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-26-2005
Author
Odd-Egil Olsen
Grethe Myklebust
Lars Engebretsen
Ingar Holme
Roald Bahr
Author Affiliation
Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center, Norwegian University of Sport and Physical Education, 0806 Oslo, Norway. odd-egil.olsen@nih.no
Source
BMJ. 2005 Feb 26;330(7489):449
Date
Feb-26-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Ankle Injuries - prevention & control
Athletic Injuries - prevention & control
Cluster analysis
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Humans
Knee Injuries - prevention & control
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of a structured warm-up programme designed to reduce the incidence of knee and ankle injuries in young people participating in sports. DESIGN: Cluster randomised controlled trial with clubs as the unit of randomisation. SETTING: 120 team handball clubs from central and eastern Norway (61 clubs in the intervention group, 59 in the control group) followed for one league season (eight months). PARTICIPANTS: 1837 players aged 15-17 years; 958 players (808 female and 150 male) in the intervention group; 879 players (778 female and 101 male) in the control group. INTERVENTION: A structured warm-up programme to improve running, cutting, and landing technique as well as neuromuscular control, balance, and strength. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The rate of acute injuries to the knee or ankle. RESULTS: During the season, 129 acute knee or ankle injuries occurred, 81 injuries in the control group (0.9 (SE 0.09) injuries per 1000 player hours; 0.3 (SE 0.17) in training v 5.3 (SE 0.06) during matches) and 48 injuries in the intervention group (0.5 (SE 0.11) injuries per 1000 player hours; 0.2 (SE 0.18) in training v 2.5 (SE 0.06) during matches). Fewer injured players were in the intervention group than in the control group (46 (4.8%) v (76 (8.6%); relative risk intervention group v control group 0.53, 95% confidence interval 0.35 to 0.81). CONCLUSION: A structured programme of warm-up exercises can prevent knee and ankle injuries in young people playing sports. Preventive training should therefore be introduced as an integral part of youth sports programmes.
PubMed ID
15699058 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exercise therapy versus arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for degenerative meniscal tear in middle aged patients: randomised controlled trial with two year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281365
Source
BMJ. 2016 Jul 20;354:i3740
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-20-2016
Author
Nina Jullum Kise
May Arna Risberg
Silje Stensrud
Jonas Ranstam
Lars Engebretsen
Ewa M Roos
Source
BMJ. 2016 Jul 20;354:i3740
Date
Jul-20-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arthroscopy - adverse effects - methods
Exercise Therapy - adverse effects - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Knee Joint - surgery
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle strength
Norway
Pain
Pain Measurement
Quality of Life
Severity of Illness Index
Single-Blind Method
Tibial Meniscus Injuries - diagnostic imaging - therapy
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
 To determine if exercise therapy is superior to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for knee function in middle aged patients with degenerative meniscal tears.
 Randomised controlled superiority trial.
 Orthopaedic departments at two public hospitals and two physiotherapy clinics in Norway.
 140 adults, mean age 49.5 years (range 35.7-59.9), with degenerative medial meniscal tear verified by magnetic resonance imaging. 96% had no definitive radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis.
 12 week supervised exercise therapy alone or arthroscopic partial meniscectomy alone.
 Intention to treat analysis of between group difference in change in knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS4), defined a priori as the mean score for four of five KOOS subscale scores (pain, other symptoms, function in sport and recreation, and knee related quality of life) from baseline to two year follow-up and change in thigh muscle strength from baseline to three months.
 No clinically relevant difference was found between the two groups in change in KOOS4 at two years (0.9 points, 95% confidence interval -4.3 to 6.1; P=0.72). At three months, muscle strength had improved in the exercise group (P=0.004). No serious adverse events occurred in either group during the two year follow-up. 19% of the participants allocated to exercise therapy crossed over to surgery during the two year follow-up, with no additional benefit.
 The observed difference in treatment effect was minute after two years of follow-up, and the trial's inferential uncertainty was sufficiently small to exclude clinically relevant differences. Exercise therapy showed positive effects over surgery in improving thigh muscle strength, at least in the short term. Our results should encourage clinicians and middle aged patients with degenerative meniscal tear and no definitive radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis to consider supervised exercise therapy as a treatment option.Trial registration www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01002794).
PubMed ID
27440192 View in PubMed
Less detail

Fit for the fight? Illnesses in the Norwegian team in the Vancouver Olympic Games.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136289
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2011 Jun;45(7):571-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Dag Vidar Hanstad
Ola Rønsen
Svein S Andersen
Kathrin Steffen
Lars Engebretsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cultural and Social Studies, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway. dag.vidar.hanstad@nih.no
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2011 Jun;45(7):571-5
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anniversaries and Special Events
British Columbia - epidemiology
Female
Gastroenteritis - ethnology
Health status
Humans
Infectious Mononucleosis - ethnology
Male
Norway - ethnology
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Pharyngitis - ethnology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Preventive Health Services - organization & administration
Sports
Sports Medicine - organization & administration
Abstract
The development of strategies to prevent illnesses before and during Olympic Games provides a basis for improved health and Olympic results.
(1) To document the efficacy of a prevention programme on illness in a national Olympic team before and during the 2010 Vancouver Olympic Winter Games (OWG), (2) to compare the illness incidence in the Norwegian team with Norwegian incidence data during the Turin 2006 OWG and (3) to compare the illness incidence in the Norwegian team with illness rates of other nations in the Vancouver OWG.
Information on prevention measures of illnesses in the Norwegian Olympic team was based on interviews with the Chief Medical Officer (CMO) and the Chief Nutrition and Sport Psychology Officers, and on a review of CMO reports before and after the 2010 OWG. The prevalence data on illness were obtained from the daily reports on injuries and illness to the International Olympic Committee.
The illness rate was 5.1% (five of 99 athletes) compared with 17.3% (13 out of 75 athletes) in Turin (p=0.008). A total of four athletes missed one competition during the Vancouver Games owing to illness, compared with eight in Turin. The average illness rate for all nations in the Vancouver OWG was 7.2%. Conclusions Although no definite cause-and-effect link between the implementation of preventive measures and the prevalence of illness in the 2010 OWG could be established, the reduced illness rate compared with the 2006 OWG, and the low prevalence of illnesses compared with other nations in the Vancouver OWG suggest that the preparations were effective.
PubMed ID
21393259 View in PubMed
Less detail

46 records – page 1 of 5.