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Accelerometer epoch setting is decisive for associations between physical activity and metabolic health in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308136
Source
J Sports Sci. 2020 Feb; 38(3):256-263
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2020
Author
Eivind Aadland
Lars Bo Andersen
Sigmund Alfred Anderssen
Geir Kåre Resaland
Olav Martin Kvalheim
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Education, Arts and Sports, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Sogndal, Norway.
Source
J Sports Sci. 2020 Feb; 38(3):256-263
Date
Feb-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Abdominal Fat
Accelerometry - methods
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Child
Child health
Child, Preschool
Exercise - physiology
Female
Fitness Trackers
Homeostasis
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Lipid Metabolism
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Norway
Physical Fitness - physiology
Abstract
When analysing physical activity (PA) levels using accelerometry, the epoch setting is critical to capture intensity-specific PA correctly. The aim of the present study was to investigate the PA intensity signatures related to metabolic health in children using different epoch settings. A sample of 841 Norwegian children (age 10.2 ± 0.3 years; BMI 18.0 ± 3.0; 50% boys) provided data on accelerometry (ActiGraph GT3X+) and several indices of metabolic health (aerobic fitness, abdominal fatness, insulin sensitivity, lipid metabolism, blood pressure) that were used to create a composite metabolic health score. We created intensity spectra from 0-99 to = 10000 counts per minute (cpm) for files aggregated using 1, 10, and 60-second epoch periods and used multivariate pattern analysis to analyse the data. The association patterns with metabolic health differed substantially between epoch settings. The intensity intervals most strongly associated with metabolic health were 7000-8000 cpm for data analysed using 1-second epoch, 5500-6500 cpm for data analysed using 10-second epoch, and 4000-5000 cpm analysed using 60-second epoch. Aggregation of data over different epoch periods has a clear impact on how PA intensities in the moderate and vigorous range are associated with childhood metabolic health.
PubMed ID
31735120 View in PubMed
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Adiposity, aerobic fitness, muscle fitness, and markers of inflammation in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119134
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2013 Apr;45(4):714-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Jostein Steene-Johannessen
Elin Kolle
Lars Bo Andersen
Sigmund A Anderssen
Author Affiliation
Department of Sports, Faculty of Teacher Education and Sports, Sogn og Fjordane University College, Sogndal, Norway. jostsj@hisf.no
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2013 Apr;45(4):714-21
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - physiology
Biological Markers - blood
Child
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Inflammation - blood - diagnosis
Inflammation Mediators - blood
Male
Muscle Strength - physiology
Norway
Physical Fitness - physiology
Regression Analysis
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to describe levels of inflammation markers in Norwegian children and to examine the associations of adiposity, aerobic fitness, and muscle fitness with markers of inflammation.
In 2005-2006, 1467 nine-year-olds were randomly selected from all regions in Norway. The participation rate was 89%. The inflammatory markers evaluated included C-reactive protein (CRP), leptin, adiponectin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, tumor necrosis factor-a, hepatocyte growth factor, resistin, and interleukin-6. We assessed muscular strength by measuring explosive, isometric, and endurance strength. Aerobic fitness was measured directly during a maximal cycle ergometer test. Adiposity was expressed as waist circumference (WC).
The girls had significantly higher levels of CRP, leptin, adiponectin, and resistin and lower levels of tumor necrosis factor-a compared with the boys. We observed a graded association of CRP and leptin levels across quintiles of WC, aerobic fitness, and muscle fitness (P = 0.001 for all participants). The regression analyses revealed that WC, aerobic fitness, and muscle fitness were independently associated with the CRP (WC ß = 0.158, P
PubMed ID
23135365 View in PubMed
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Adult food intake patterns are related to adult and childhood socioeconomic status.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101762
Source
J Nutr. 2011 May;141(5):928-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Helle Hare-Bruun
Per Togo
Lars Bo Andersen
Berit Lilienthal Heitmann
Author Affiliation
Research Unit for Dietary Studies, Institute of Preventive Medicine, Copenhagen Capital Region, Copenhagen University Hospitals, DK 1357 Copenhagen, Denmark. HH2@ipm.regionh.dk
Source
J Nutr. 2011 May;141(5):928-34
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aging
Body mass index
Child
Child Development
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Diet - economics - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Patient Dropouts
Principal Component Analysis
Sex Characteristics
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Our objective was to examine the influence of adult and childhood socioeconomic status (SES) on attained adult food intake patterns. We used data from a 20- to 22-y follow-up study of 1904 Danish teenagers. The baseline survey was conducted partly in 1983 and partly in 1985 and the follow-up survey was conducted in 2005. Dietary data were collected at follow-up using a 195-item FFQ. Food patterns were derived from principal component analysis. Two food patterns labeled "traditional-western food pattern" and "green food pattern" were identified. In men, adult SES was inversely associated with adherence to the traditional-western food pattern. High adherence to the green food pattern was positively related to high adult SES in both sexes. Among women, those with high SES in childhood had higher green food pattern factor scores than those with low childhood SES, regardless of adult SES. Among men, those with high adult SES had higher green food pattern factor scores than those with low adult SES, regardless of childhood SES. In conclusion, socioeconomic position is important for the development of adult food intake patterns. However, childhood SES seems more important for adult female food intake patterns, whereas adult SES seems more important for adult male food intake patterns.
PubMed ID
21451129 View in PubMed
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Aerobic fitness thresholds to define poor cardiometabolic health in children and youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299130
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2019 Feb; 29(2):240-250
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Eivind Aadland
Sigmund Alfred Anderssen
Lars Bo Andersen
Geir Kåre Resaland
Elin Kolle
Jostein Steene-Johannessen
Author Affiliation
Department of Sport, Food and Natural Sciences, Faculty of Education, Arts and Sports, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Sogndal, Norway.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2019 Feb; 29(2):240-250
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Blood pressure
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Oxygen consumption
Reference Values
Risk factors
Triglycerides - blood
Waist Circumference
Abstract
Aerobic fitness is an apparent candidate for screening children and youth for poor cardiometabolic health and future risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Yet, age- and sex-specific cut points for children and youth determined using a maximal protocol and directly measured peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak ) does not exist. We used a nationally representative sample of 1462 Norwegian children and youth (788 boys and 674 girls aged 8.7-10.4 years and 14.7-16.7 years) who in 2005-2006 performed a maximal cycle ergometer test with direct measurement of VO2peak , along with measurement of several other risk factors for CVD (systolic blood pressure, waist circumference:height ratio, total:high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, triglycerides, Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance). Based on the proportion of children having clustering (least favorable quartile) of 6 (1.6%), =5 (5.2%), and =4 (10.6%) CVD risk factors, we established the 2nd, 5th, and 10th percentile cut points for VO2peak (mL/kg/min) for children and youth aged 8-18 years. Classification accuracy was determined using the Kappa coefficient (k), sensitivity, and specificity. For boys, the 2nd, 5th, and 10th percentile VO2peak cut points were 33.6-36.4, 36.3-39.8, and 38.7-43.0 mL/kg/min, respectively. For girls, the corresponding cut points were 29.7-29.1, 32.4-31.4, and 34.8-33.5 mL/kg/min Together with BMI, but without more invasive measures of traditional risk factors for CVD, these cut points can be used to screen schoolchildren for poor cardiometabolic health with moderate discriminating ability (k = 0.53).
PubMed ID
30375665 View in PubMed
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The association between aerobic fitness and physical activity in children and adolescents: the European youth heart study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100607
Source
Eur J Appl Physiol. 2010 Sep;110(2):267-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Peter Lund Kristensen
Niels Christian Moeller
Lars Korsholm
Elin Kolle
Niels Wedderkopp
Karsten Froberg
Lars Bo Andersen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense M, Denmark. plkristensen@health.sdu.dk
Source
Eur J Appl Physiol. 2010 Sep;110(2):267-75
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actigraphy - instrumentation
Adolescent
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Exercise
Exercise Test
Health Surveys
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Motor Activity
Physical Fitness
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The link between aerobic fitness and physical activity in children has been studied in a number of earlier studies and the results have generally shown weak to moderate correlations. This overall finding has been widely questioned partly because of the difficulty in obtaining valid estimates of physical activity. This study investigated the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationship between aerobic fitness and physical activity in a representative sample of 9 and 15-year-old children (n = 1260 cross-sectional, n = 153 longitudinal). The specific goal was to improve past studies using an objective method of activity assessment and taking into account a number of major sources of error. Data came from the Danish part of the European youth heart study, 1997-2003. The cross-sectional results generally showed a weak to moderate association between aerobic fitness and physical activity with standardized regression coefficients ranging from 0.14 to 0.33. The longitudinal results revealed a tendency towards an interaction effect of baseline physical activity on the relationship between changes in physical activity and aerobic fitness. Moderate to moderately strong regression effect sizes were observed in the lower quadrant of baseline physical activity compared to weak effect sizes in the remaining quadrants. In conclusion, the present study confirms earlier findings of a weak to moderate association between aerobic fitness and physical activity in total population of children. However, the study also indicates that inactive children can achieve notable increase in aerobic fitness by increasing their habitual physical activity level. A potential physiological explanation for these results is highlighted.
PubMed ID
20458593 View in PubMed
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The association between high blood pressure, physical fitness, and body mass index in adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52961
Source
Prev Med. 2003 Feb;36(2):229-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Gert A Nielsen
Lars Bo Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cancer Prevention and Documentation, Danish Cancer Society, Strandbouldevarden 49, DK 2100/National Institute of Public Health, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Prev Med. 2003 Feb;36(2):229-34
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Confidence Intervals
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - etiology
Life Style
Logistic Models
Male
Physical Fitness - physiology
Questionnaires
Sex Distribution
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to analyze the association of fitness and fatness with blood pressure (BP) and hypertension.This was a cross-sectional study of 13,557 boys and girls 15-20 years of age. Fitness was estimated from a shuttle run test, fatness from body mass index (BMI), and BP was measured sitting after 5 min of rest. Other lifestyle variables were self-reported. RESULTS: Boys had a higher systolic BP (SBP) than girls. A low physical fitness level and high BMI were independently associated with a high BP and risk of having hypertension in both girls and boys. Interaction was found between BMI and fitness. In a stratified analysis an odds ratio (OR) of 3.99 was found for hypertension in girls with a BMI > 25 kg m(-2) compared to lean girls if all had a low fitness level, and an OR of 2.14 for a high BMI in girls with a high fitness level. In boys, OR for high versus low BMI were 3.23 in the low fit and 2.34 and 2.50 in the middle and upper tertile of fitness, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Fitness and BMI were independently associated to BP. BMI was a stronger predictor of hypertension in those with a low fitness level, especially in girls.
PubMed ID
12590998 View in PubMed
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Association between plasma leptin and blood pressure in two population-based samples of children and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135164
Source
J Hypertens. 2011 Jun;29(6):1093-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Anders Grøntved
Jostein Steene-Johannessen
Iben Kynde
Paul W Franks
Jørn Wulf Helge
Karsten Froberg
Sigmund A Anderssen
Lars Bo Andersen
Author Affiliation
Centre of Research in Childhood Health, Institute of Sport Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. agroentved@health.sdu.dk
Source
J Hypertens. 2011 Jun;29(6):1093-100
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Leptin - blood
Male
Norway
Population Surveillance
Abstract
In this study we examined the association between leptin and blood pressure in a population-based study of Danish and Norwegian children and adolescents. Because of the putative bidirectional relationship between leptin and adiposity we formally tested (i) the mediating effect of body mass index in the association between leptin and blood pressure, and (ii) the mediating effect of leptin in the association between body mass index and blood pressure.
To examine these aims we used a cross-sectional random sample of children and adolescents from Denmark and Norway (n = 1993) who had measures of leptin, anthropometry, blood pressure and other personal and biological risk factors for raised blood pressure available.
Both body mass index and leptin were positively associated with blood pressure (P
PubMed ID
21505347 View in PubMed
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Association of socioeconomic position with insulin resistance among children from Denmark, Estonia, and Portugal: cross sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29584
Source
BMJ. 2005 Jul 23;331(7510):183
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-23-2005
Author
Debbie A Lawlor
Maarike Harro
Niels Wedderkopp
Lars Bo Andersen
Luis B Sardinha
Chris J Riddoch
Angie S Page
Sigmund A Anderssen
Karsten Froberg
David Stansbie
George Davey Smith
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 2PR. d.a.lawlor@bristol.ac.uk
Source
BMJ. 2005 Jul 23;331(7510):183
Date
Jul-23-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Educational Status
Estonia
Female
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Insulin Resistance
Male
Portugal
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Social Class
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To examine the association between socioeconomic position and insulin resistance in children from three countries in northern Europe (Denmark), eastern Europe (Estonia), and southern Europe (Portugal) that have different physical, economic, and cultural environments. DESIGN: Cross sectional study. PARTICIPANTS: 3189 randomly selected schoolchildren aged 9 and 15 years from Denmark (n = 933), Estonia (n = 1103), and Portugal (n = 1153). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Insulin resistance (homoeostasis model assessment). RESULTS: Family income and parental education were inversely associated with insulin resistance in Danish children but were positively associated with insulin resistance in Estonian and Portuguese children. Among Danish children, insulin resistance was 24% lower (95% confidence interval -38% to -10%) in those whose fathers had the most education compared with those with the least education. The equivalent results were 15% (2% to 28%) higher for Estonia and 19% (2% to 36%) higher for Portugal. These associations remained after adjustment for a range of covariates: -20% (-36% to -5%) for Denmark, 10% (-4% to 24%) for Estonia, and 18% (-1% to 31%) for Portugal. Strong statistical evidence supported differences between the associations in Denmark and those in the other two countries in both unadjusted and adjusted models (all P
Notes
Comment In: BMJ. 2005 Jul 23;331(7510):186-716037447
PubMed ID
16037446 View in PubMed
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Associations between objectively assessed physical activity and indicators of body fatness in 9- to 10-y-old European children: a population-based study from 4 distinct regions in Europe (the European Youth Heart Study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30172
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Sep;80(3):584-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Ulf Ekelund
Luis B Sardinha
Sigmund A Anderssen
Marike Harro
Paul W Franks
Sören Brage
Ashley R Cooper
Lars Bo Andersen
Chris Riddoch
Karsten Froberg
Author Affiliation
MRC Epidemiology Unit, Strangeways Research Laboratories, Wort's Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, United Kingdom. ue202@medschl.cam.ac.uk
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Sep;80(3):584-90
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - growth & development - metabolism
Anthropometry
Body Composition - physiology
Child
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Estonia - epidemiology
Exercise - physiology
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Monitoring, Physiologic
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology
Portugal - epidemiology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The rising prevalence of obesity in children may be due to a reduction in physical activity (PA). OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to study the associations of objectively measured PA volume and its subcomponents with indicators of body fatness. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study of 1292 children aged 9-10 y from 4 distinct regions in Europe (Odense, Denmark; the island of Madeira, Portugal; Oslo; and Tartu, Estonia) was conducted. PA was measured by accelerometry, and indicators of body fatness were the sum of 5 skinfold thicknesses and body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)). We examined the associations between PA and body fatness by using general linear models adjusted for potential confounding variables. RESULTS: After adjustment for sex, study location, sexual maturity, birth weight, and parental BMI, time (min/d) spent at moderate and vigorous PA (P = 0.032) and time (min/d) spent at vigorous PA were significantly (P = 0.015) and independently associated with body fatness. Sex, study location, sexual maturity, birth weight, and parental BMI explained 29% (adjusted R(2) = 0.29) of the variation in body fatness. Time spent at vigorous PA explained an additional 0.5%. Children who accumulated 2 h/d. CONCLUSIONS: The accumulated amount of time spent at moderate and vigorous PA is related to body fatness in children, but this relation is weak; the explained variance was
Notes
Comment In: Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Jun;81(6):1449; author reply 1449-5015941901
PubMed ID
15321796 View in PubMed
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Associations between objectively measured physical activity intensity in childhood and measures of subclinical cardiovascular disease in adolescence: prospective observations from the European Youth Heart Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263919
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2014 Oct;48(20):1502-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Mathias Ried-Larsen
Anders Grøntved
Niels Christian Møller
Kristian Traberg Larsen
Karsten Froberg
Lars Bo Andersen
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2014 Oct;48(20):1502-7
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Carotid Artery Diseases - epidemiology - physiopathology
Carotid Artery, Common - physiopathology
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Exercise - physiology
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolic Diseases - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Vascular Stiffness - physiology
Abstract
No prospective studies have investigated the association between physical activity (PA) and carotid subclinical cardiovascular disease across childhood. Therefore, the primary aim was to investigate the association between PA intensity across childhood and carotid intima media thickness (cIMT) and stiffness in adolescence. Second, we included a clustered cardiovascular disease risk score as outcome.
This was a prospective study of a sample of 254 children (baseline age 8-10 years) with a 6-year follow-up. The mean exposure and the change in minutes of moderate-and-vigorous and vigorous PA intensity were measured using the Actigraph activity monitor. Subclinical cardiovascular disease was expressed as cIMT, carotid arterial stiffness and secondarily as a metabolic risk z-score including the homoeostasis model assessment score of insulin resistance, triglycerides, total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein ratio, inverse of cardiorespiratory fitness, systolic blood pressure and the sum of four skinfolds.
No associations were observed between PA intensity variables and cIMT or carotid arterial stiffness (p>0.05). Neither change in PA intensity (moderate-and-vigorous nor vigorous) nor mean minutes of moderate-and-vigorous PA intensity was associated to the metabolic risk z-score in adolescence (p>0.05). However, a significant inverse association was observed between mean minutes of vigorous PA and the metabolic risk z-score in adolescence independent of gender and biological maturity (standard ß=-0.19 p=0.007).
A high mean exposure to, or changes in, minutes spent at higher PA intensities across childhood was not associated to cIMT or stiffness in the carotid arteries in adolescence. Our observations suggest that a high volume of vigorous PA across childhood independently associated with lower metabolic cardio vascular disease risk in adolescence.
PubMed ID
23584828 View in PubMed
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56 records – page 1 of 6.