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Air exposure assessment and biological monitoring of manganese and other major welding fume components in welders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165526
Source
J Environ Monit. 2006 Oct;8(10):1078-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Dag G Ellingsen
Larisa Dubeikovskaya
Kari Dahl
Maxim Chashchin
Valery Chashchin
Evgeny Zibarev
Yngvar Thomassen
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Occupational Health, P.O. Box 8149 Dep, N-0033 Oslo, Norway. dag.ellingsen@stami.no
Source
J Environ Monit. 2006 Oct;8(10):1078-86
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis - blood - urine
Dust - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Female
Humans
Male
Metals - analysis - blood - urine
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Russia
Steel
Welding
Abstract
In a cross-sectional study, 96 welders were compared with 96 control subjects. Also 27 former welders, all diagnosed as having manganism, were examined. Exposure to welding fumes was determined in the 96 welders, while the concentration of elements in whole blood and urine was determined in all subjects. The geometric mean (GM) concentrations of manganese (Mn) and iron in the workroom air were 97 microg m(-3) (range 3-4620 microg m(-3); n=188) and 894 microg m(-3) (range 106-20 300 microg m(-3); n=188), respectively. Thus the Mn concentration in the workroom air was on average 10.6% (GM) of that of the Fe concentration. No substantial difference was observed in the air Mn concentrations when welding mild steel as compared to welding stainless steel. The arithmetic mean (AM) concentration of Mn in whole blood (B-Mn) was about 25% higher in the welders compared to the controls (8.6 vs. 6.9 microg l(-1); p
PubMed ID
17240914 View in PubMed
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