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110 records – page 1 of 11.

Age dependence of the west/east gradient in cardiovascular mortality of Finnish males.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239310
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1985;218(5):463-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
L. Tenkanen
L. Teppo
T. Hakulinen
E. Läärä
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1985;218(5):463-71
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Coronary Disease - mortality
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk
Sex Factors
Smoking
Abstract
A cohort of 4 475 Finnish men was followed up during 1964-80 in order to study regional differences in mortality from cardiovascular diseases, especially ischaemic heart disease (IHD). The west/east gradient in cardiovascular mortality recorded in several previous studies was greatly age-dependent. The excess eastern risk was a feature of younger age groups; with increasing age the risk pattern was reversed. The risk factors in IHD in eastern Finland have an element which somehow accelerates the process of this disease.
PubMed ID
4091046 View in PubMed
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[Association between cancer and exposure to chlorophenols in a county located in southern Finland].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227775
Source
Duodecim. 1991;107(9):702-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991

Basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma of the skin in Finland. Site distribution and patient survival.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230230
Source
Int J Dermatol. 1989 Sep;28(7):445-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1989
Author
S. Karjalainen
H. Salo
L. Teppo
Author Affiliation
Finnish Cancer Registry, Helsinki University Central Hospital.
Source
Int J Dermatol. 1989 Sep;28(7):445-50
Date
Sep-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - mortality
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - mortality
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Sex Factors
Skin Neoplasms - mortality
Time Factors
Abstract
Long-term survival of patients with basal cell (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin and site distribution of the lesions were studied using ample nationwide cancer registry data. The material consisted of 23,975 patients with BCC and 2,927 patients with SCC diagnosed in Finland from 1967 to 1981. The proportion of patients with lesions in the head and neck region was 77.5% in men and 81.4% in women for BCC and, 75.7% in men and 75.8% in women for SCC. The 5- and 10-year relative survival rates (RSRs) of patients with BCC were very close to 100%. The 5-year RSR of patients with SCC diagnosed from 1974 to 1981 was 87.7% in men and 84.0% in women. In patients with SCC the worst prognosis was for lesions of the scalp and neck in men (80.2%) and for those of the ears in women (73.2%).
PubMed ID
2777443 View in PubMed
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Bladder cancer and the risk of smoking-related cancers during followup.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216973
Source
J Urol. 1994 Nov;152(5 Pt 1):1420-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1994
Author
E. Salminen
E. Pukkala
L. Teppo
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Turku University Hospital, Finland.
Source
J Urol. 1994 Nov;152(5 Pt 1):1420-3
Date
Nov-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Second Primary - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology
Abstract
The risk of smoking-related secondary cancers developing in bladder cancer patients was studied. The study population consisted of 10,014 bladder cancer patients reported to the Finnish Cancer Registry between 1953 and 1989. The risk of contracting a new primary cancer was estimated as a standardized incidence ratio, defined as the ratio of the observed and expected numbers of cases. Of 660 secondary cancers (6.6%) observed (standardized incidence ratio 0.96) 44% were considered to be smoking-related. Lung cancer was the most common secondary cancer (30% overall), and it occurred significantly more often than expected (standardized incidence ratio 1.31, 95% confidence interval 1.13 to 1.50). Also, larynx cancer among men (standardized incidence ratio 1.67, 95% confidence interval 0.95 to 2.79) and kidney cancer among women (standardized incidence ratio 3.55, 95% confidence interval 1.84 to 6.20) were found more often than expected. These excess risks were observed up to 20 years after diagnosis of bladder cancer. Therefore, bladder cancer patients experience an excess risk of smoking-related new tumors, which must be acknowledged during the initial evaluation and regular followup of such patients.
PubMed ID
7933174 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer and use of rauwolfia and other antihypertensive agents in hypertensive patients: a nationwide case-control study in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250489
Source
Int J Cancer. 1976 Dec 15;18(6):727-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-1976
Author
A. Aromaa
M. Hakama
T. Hakulinen
E. Saxén
L. Teppo
J. Idä lan-Heikkilä
Source
Int J Cancer. 1976 Dec 15;18(6):727-38
Date
Dec-15-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Breast Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Carcinogens
Female
Finland
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy
Insurance, Health
Middle Aged
Phytotherapy
Plants, Medicinal
Rauwolfia - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Registries
Risk
Abstract
Two nationwide registers, the Finnish Cancer Registry and a register of persons entitled to free drugs for hypertension, were linked in a case-control study of the association of breast cancer and use of rauwolfia. Cases were all hypertensive patients in whom breast cancer was diagnosed in 1973. To test the association specifically with rauwolfia, controls were hypertensive women matched with the cases for age and geographic area and approximately matched for duration of treatment for hypertension. There were 109 case-control pairs. Use of any physician-prescribed drugs during the year prior to diagnosis of breast cancer was ascertained from original prescriptions. In the first set of analyses the patients were classified according to the drug used during most days of the year ("main antihypertensive agent"). In the second set a person qualified as a user of the respective drug regardless of the amount taken. The relative risks in the use of rauwolfia, methyldopa, another synthetic antihypertensive or a diuretic as main antihypertensive agent all ranged between 0.90 and 1.11. The results based on use of a drug in any amount were similar. Next, pairs in which duration of treatment for hypertension was different for cases and controls were excluded. The relative risk associated with use of rauwolfia as main antihypertensive agent then increased from 1.00 to 1.30 and the risk associated with use of any amount of rauwolfia from 1.16 to 2.14. Simultaneously, the relative risk in the use of digitalis was raised from 1.33 to 2.67 and of nitroglycerin from 1.00 to 1.71. Cases also used more types of antihypertensive agents simultaneously than controls. There was no association between rauwolfia-use and breast cancer in analyses limited to pairs in which neither case nor control used digitalis. Thus, there was not a consistent drug-specific association between rauwolfia-use and breast cancer in hypertensive patients. An underlying association of hypertension, heart disease or its treatment (digitalis) and breast cancer may have confounded some of the results of this and earlier studies. In conclusion, it is unlikely that use of rauwolfia increases the risk of breast cancer.
PubMed ID
992904 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among European man-made vitreous fiber production workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20877
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1999 Jun;25(3):222-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
P. Boffetta
A. Andersen
J. Hansen
J H Olsen
N. Plato
L. Teppo
P. Westerholm
R. Saracci
Author Affiliation
International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. boffetta@iarc.fr
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1999 Jun;25(3):222-6
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Incidence
Mineral Fibers
Mouth Neoplasms - epidemiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study analyzed cancer incidence among man-made vitreous fiber workers. METHODS: A cancer incidence follow-up was conducted among 3685 rock-slag wool (RSW) and 2611 glass wool (GW) production workers employed for > or =1 year in Denmark, Finland, Norway, or Sweden, and the standardized incidence ratios (SIR) were calculated on the basis of national incidence rates. RESULTS: Overall cancer incidence was close to expectation. Lung cancer incidence was increased among the RSW [SIR 1.08, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.85-1.36] and GW (SIR 1.28, 95% CI 0.91-1.74) workers. For both subcohorts, a trend was suggested for time since first employment (P-value for linear trend 0.1 and 0.2, respectively). Neither subcohort showed an association with employment during the early technological phase, when fiber exposure was high. The incidence of oral, pharyngeal, and laryngeal cancer was increased among the RSW (SIR 1.46, 95% CI 0.99-2.07) and the GW (SIR 1.41, 95% CI 0.80-2.28) subcohorts. Despite a trend in risk for these neoplasms among the GW workers with time since first employment, the lack of a positive relation with other indirect indicators of fiber exposure points against a causal interpretation. No association between RSW or GW exposure and the risk of other neoplasms was suggested. CONCLUSIONS: These lung cancer results are similar to those of a mortality study that included a larger number of factories. For other cancers there was no suggestion of an association with RSW or GW exposure.
PubMed ID
10450772 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence by living area, social class and occupation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26700
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1984 Dec;10(6 Spec No):361-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1984
Author
L. Teppo
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1984 Dec;10(6 Spec No):361-6
Date
Dec-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Income
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupations
Risk
Rural Population
Sex Factors
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population
Abstract
The variation in the incidence of cancer between geographic areas and socio-economic classes is outlined. In many instances the differences in the incidence can be attributed to differences in life-style factors such as smoking, diet, sexual habits, and the reproductive history of women. The role of smoking as an explanation of the variation in the risk of lung cancer between occupational groups is emphasized.
PubMed ID
6535240 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence following chlorophenol exposure in a community in southern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223846
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1992 May-Jun;47(3):167-75
Publication Type
Article
Author
P. Lampi
T. Hakulinen
T. Luostarinen
E. Pukkala
L. Teppo
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute-Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1992 May-Jun;47(3):167-75
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Chlorophenols
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Finland - epidemiology
Fishes
Humans
Incidence
Industry
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - chemically induced - epidemiology
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Sarcoma - chemically induced - epidemiology
Soft Tissue Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Water Pollution, Chemical - adverse effects
Water Supply - standards
Wood
Abstract
Chlorophenols have contaminated the drinking water system and the local lake in the village of Järvelä in southern Finland. Local geology, ground water streams, and chemical analyses incriminated a local sawmill as the only plausible source of exposure. Cancer incidence in the municipality of Kärkölä (half of the population lives in Järvelä), compared with the rest of the local health-care district and with the greater cancer control region, indicated an excess of soft-tissue sarcomas and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. A case-control study, which focused on cancers of the colon, bladder and soft tissues, lymphomas, and leukemia, demonstrated a significantly elevated risk ratio for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas among persons who consumed fish from the local lake, which was contaminated with chlorophenols. Probable exposure to chlorophenol-contaminated drinking water played a role in the increased incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and possibly was a factor in the development of soft-tissue sarcoma.
PubMed ID
1596099 View in PubMed
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110 records – page 1 of 11.