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AIDS/HIV survey--Prince Edward Island.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221249
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1993 Apr 15;19(7):49-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1993
Author
L. Sweet
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Social Services, Charlottetown, Prince Edward, Island.
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1993 Apr 15;19(7):49-50
Date
Apr-15-1993
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology
HIV Seropositivity - epidemiology
HIV Seroprevalence
Health Surveys
Humans
Prince Edward Island - epidemiology
PubMed ID
8495222 View in PubMed
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Geographical variations in the prevalence of atopic sensitization in six study sites across Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142789
Source
Allergy. 2010 Nov;65(11):1404-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
M. Chan-Yeung
N R Anthonisen
M R Becklake
D. Bowie
A. Sonia Buist
H. Dimich-Ward
P. Ernst
M R Sears
H C Siersted
L. Sweet
L. Van Til
J. Manfreda
Author Affiliation
Respiratory Division, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. myeung@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Allergy. 2010 Nov;65(11):1404-13
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Animals
Asthma - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - epidemiology
Male
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Skin Tests
Young Adult
Abstract
Geographical variations in atopic sensitization in Canada have not been described previously. This study used the standardized protocol of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey-1 (ECRHS-1) to investigate the distribution and predictors of atopic sensitization in six sites across Canada and to compare the results with some ECRHS-1 centers.
Adults aged 20-44 years in six study sites across Canada underwent allergy skin testing using 14 allergens (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae) cat, cockroach, grasses (Timothy grass, Kentucky grass), molds (Cladosporium herbarium, Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus fumigatus, Penicillium), trees (tree mix, birch, Olea europea), and common ragweed.
The overall prevalence of atopy (skin test over 0 mm to any allergen) was 62.7%. There was significant geographical variation in the prevalence of atopy in the six study sites (lowest 55.6% [95% C.I.51.3-59.9] in Prince Edward Island, highest 66.0 [61.7-70.3] in Montreal) and of sensitization to each of the allergens tested even after adjustment for confounders. When the first eight of the nine allergens in the ECRHS were used to estimate the prevalence of atopic sensitization, the prevalence of atopy in Canada was 57% compared with 35.2% overall for centers in the ECRHS. The prevalence of atopy in Vancouver (57% [52.3-61.8]) was close to that of Portland, Oregon (52.1% [46.2-58.0]).
There was a significant variation in atopic sensitization among different study sites across Canada. The prevalence of atopic sensitization is relatively high in Canada compared with sites in the ECRHS and this may, in part, account for the high prevalence of asthma and asthma symptoms in Canada.
PubMed ID
20557300 View in PubMed
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Hepatitis C in Prince Edward Island: a descriptive review of reported cases, 1990-1995.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209121
Source
Can J Public Health. 1997 Mar-Apr;88(2):91-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
E. Stratton
L. Sweet
A. Latorraca-Walsh
P R Gully
Author Affiliation
Bloodborne Pathogens Group, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1997 Mar-Apr;88(2):91-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Blood Donors
Canada
Female
Hepatitis C - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Risk factors
Abstract
The prevalence of hepatitis C in Canada is not known. There is limited information on most small area populations such as Prince Edward Island.
A retrospective approach was used to obtain detailed information on all cases of hepatitis C identified in Prince Edward Island from December 1990 to September 1995. Cases were reviewed for demographic, clinical and risk factor information, including blood donation and transfusion histories.
There were 54 RIBA confirmed cases of hepatitis C infection included in the Prince Edward Island Hepatitis C Database, of which 38 (70%) were males. Age ranged from 18 to 76 years, with a mean age of 38 years. Twenty-eight (52%) of the cases had a history of injection drug use, and 24 (44%) had received blood or blood products in the past. There were five cases with neither of these risk factors identified.
The results suggest that, in this small, primarily rural population, injection drug use is the most common means of hepatitis C transmission, followed by receipt of blood or blood products.
PubMed ID
9170686 View in PubMed
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Home or away? Investigation of Salmonella enteritidis PFGE pattern SENXAI.0003 and SENBNI.0003, phage type 8, the in the Maritimes, 2005.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166819
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2006 Oct 15;32(20):231-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2006

Incidence of Staphylococcus aureus infections in a chronic care facility-Nova Scotia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230357
Source
Can Dis Wkly Rep. 1989 Aug 5;15(31):159-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-5-1989

Molecular epidemiology of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in humans on Prince Edward Island, Canada: evidence of zoonotic transmission from cattle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126445
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2012 Sep;59(6):424-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
E. Budu-Amoako
S J Greenwood
B R Dixon
L. Sweet
L. Ang
H W Barkema
J T McClure
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Management Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada. ebamoako@biofoodtech.ca
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2012 Sep;59(6):424-33
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Cattle
Cattle Diseases - epidemiology - parasitology - transmission
Child
Child, Preschool
Cryptosporidiosis - epidemiology - parasitology - transmission
Cryptosporidium - genetics - isolation & purification
DNA, Protozoan - genetics
Feces - parasitology
Genes, Protozoan - genetics
Genotype
Giardia - genetics - isolation & purification
Giardiasis - epidemiology - parasitology - transmission
Humans
Infant
Middle Aged
Molecular Epidemiology
Prevalence
Prince Edward Island - epidemiology
Seasons
Young Adult
Zoonoses - transmission
Abstract
To determine the zoonotic potential of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Prince Edward Island (PEI), Canada, 658 human faecal specimens were screened that were submitted to the Queen Elizabeth Hospital diagnostic laboratory. Overall, 143 (22%) samples were Cryptosporidium positive, while three (0.5%) were positive for Giardia. Successful genotyping of 25 Cryptosporidium isolates by sequence analysis of the HSP70 gene revealed that 28 and 72% were C. hominis and C. parvum, respectively. Cryptosporidium isolates from humans and previously genotyped C. parvum from beef cattle were subtyped by sequence analysis of the GP60 gene. Subtyping identified three subtypes belonging to the family IIa. All three subtypes IIaA16G2RI (55%), IIaA16G3RI (22%) and IIaA15G2RI (22%) were found in the animal isolates, while two of the subtypes found in the animals, IIaA16G2RI (80%) and IIaA15G2RI (20%), were also identified in the human isolates. Cryptosporidium infection in humans peaked in April-June. Molecular epidemiological analysis of the human data showed a C. parvum peak in the spring and a relatively smaller peak for C. hominis in July-September. The majority (57%) of human Cryptosporidium isolates were found in children between 5 and 10 years of age. All three Giardia isolates were identified as G. duodenalis assemblage A. The overall Cryptosporidium prevalence in our human samples was high relative to other studies, but because the samples were submitted to a hospital diagnostic laboratory, the results may not be representative of the general population. Further, the presence of the same zoonotic C. parvum subtypes in cattle and human isolates implies that transmission is largely zoonotic and cattle may be a source of sporadic human infections on PEI. The presence of Giardia in people on PEI is rare, and the assemblage A found in humans might originate from humans, livestock or other domestic or wild animals.
PubMed ID
22390418 View in PubMed
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Occupational asthma in adults in six Canadian communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196362
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2000 Dec;162(6):2058-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
A R Johnson
H D Dimich-Ward
J. Manfreda
M R Becklake
P. Ernst
M R Sears
D M Bowie
L. Sweet
M. Chan-Yeung
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. anthonyj@med.usyd.edu.au
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2000 Dec;162(6):2058-62
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Asthma - diagnosis - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Humans
Male
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Risk
Abstract
We examined the prevalence, population attributable risk (PAR), and clinical characteristics of occupational asthma (OA) in a randomly selected population in six communities in Canada. Our study followed the European Community Respiratory Health Survey protocol. A randomly selected population of 18,701 (87% response rate) persons from the study communities, ranging in age from 20 to 44 yr, completed an initial questionnaire, of whom 2,974 (39% response rate) attended the laboratory and completed supplementary questionnaires. Of these latter individuals, 383 had asthma. Asthma was defined as physician-diagnosed asthma, and adult-onset asthma was defined as a first attack at age 15 yr or older. We used several methods for estimating OA as follows: (1) reporting of a high-risk job (occupation and industry) for OA at the time of asthma onset (Probable OA); (2) reporting of exposure to a substance that may cause OA (Possible OA) while not in a high-risk job at the time of asthma onset; and (3) combination of the PAR for high-risk jobs and exposures. The prevalence (95% confidence interval [CI]) of Probable OA and Possible OA combined was 36.1% (31.3 to 41.0%) among subjects with adult-onset asthma. The occupations most commonly reported in association with OA were nursing in the Probable OA group and clerical and food preparation in the Possible OA group. The clinical characteristics and exposures reported by both groups were similar. The PAR for adult-onset asthma in high-risk jobs and exposures was 18.2%. The assessment of occupation and industry alone, rather than of exposures, may underestimate the contribution of occupational exposures to asthma prevalence.
PubMed ID
11112114 View in PubMed
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Outbreak of staphylococcal foodborne illness related to consumption of lobster--Nova Scotia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230954
Source
Can Dis Wkly Rep. 1989 Apr 15;15(15):81-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1989

Prevalence of asthma symptoms among adults aged 20-44 years in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194975
Source
CMAJ. 2001 Apr 3;164(7):995-1001
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-3-2001
Author
J. Manfreda
M R Becklake
M R Sears
M. Chan-Yeung
H. Dimich-Ward
H C Siersted
P. Ernst
L. Sweet
L. Van Til
D M Bowie
N R Anthonisen
R B Tate
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Man. manfred@ms.umanitoba.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2001 Apr 3;164(7):995-1001
Date
Apr-3-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - drug therapy - epidemiology - pathology
Bronchodilator Agents - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Epidemiologic Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Abstract
Reported prevalence rates of asthma vary within and between countries around the world. These differences suggest environmental factors in addition to genetic factors in the cause of the disease and may provide clues for preventive strategies. We examined the variability of asthma-related symptoms and medication use among adults in 6 sites across Canada (Vancouver, Winnipeg, Hamilton, Montreal, Halifax and Prince Edward Island) and compared our findings with those from sites that had participated in a recent European survey.
We used the same sampling strategy and standardized questionnaire as those used in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS). The 6 Canadian sites were selected to represent different environments with respect to climate, air pollution and occupational exposure. Community-based samples of 3000 to 4000 people aged 20-44 years were randomly selected in each site. Subjects were asked to complete the questionnaire by mail between March 1993 and November 1994. Prevalence rates (and 95% confidence intervals [CIs]) of asthma symptoms, self-reported asthma attacks and use of asthma medication were compared across the Canadian sites and with sites that had participated in the ECRHS.
The overall response rate of those selected to receive the questionnaire was 86.5% (range 74.5%-92.8%). The prevalence rates of most asthma symptoms varied significantly among the Canadian sites. For instance, 21.9% (Montreal) to 30.4% (Halifax) of the men and 24.0% (Vancouver) to 35.2% (Halifax) of the women reported wheezing in the year before the survey. Depending on the site, 4.4% to 6.3% of the men and 5.2% to 9.5% of the women reported an asthma attack in the last year, and 4.0% to 6.1% of the men and 4.9% to 9.7% of the women were currently using asthma medication. Prevalence rates of symptoms, asthma attacks and medication use did not change with age, but they were higher among women than among men. Compared with the results from the ECRHS sites, those from the Canadian sites were among the highest.
Significant variation in the prevalence of asthma symptoms, asthma attacks and use of asthma medication between Canadian sites and international sites suggests environmental influences. Different combinations of factors in different sites may be responsible for the high prevalence rates and should be the subject of further research to guide clinical management and public health intervention.
Notes
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PubMed ID
11314453 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.