Skip header and navigation

Refine By

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Changes in frailty-related characteristics of the hip fracture population and their implications for healthcare services: evidence from Quebec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113289
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2013 Oct;24(10):2713-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
M. Auais
S. Morin
L. Nadeau
L. Finch
N. Mayo
Author Affiliation
International Centre for Health Innovation, Ivey Business School, Western University, London, ON, Canada.
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2013 Oct;24(10):2713-24
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comorbidity
Databases, Factual
Delivery of Health Care - trends
Evidence-Based Medicine - methods
Female
Frail Elderly - statistics & numerical data
Hip Fractures - epidemiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Osteoporosis - epidemiology
Osteoporotic Fractures - epidemiology
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Quebec - epidemiology
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sarcopenia - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Abstract
This study provides evidence that a number of frailty-related characteristics (older age, de novo admission to long-term care (LTC), comorbidities [Charlson Index, osteoporosis, osteoporosis risk factors, sarcopenia risk factors, and dementia]) have increased in the hip fracture population from 2001-2008. This will have significant impact on community resources, as the number of people discharged to the community is also increasing.
The aim of this study is to estimate secular changes in the prevalence of selected frailty-related characteristics among the hip fracture population in the Canadian province of Quebec (2001-2008) and the potential impact of these changes on healthcare services.
The Quebec hospitalization database was used to identify nontraumatic hip fractures for the purposes of calculating age- and sex-specific rates. Also estimated were time trends for selected frailty-related characteristics and discharge destinations.
A significant decline in fracture rates was evident for all age groups except for those
PubMed ID
23743612 View in PubMed
Less detail

Sexual abuse: a comparison between resilient victims and drug-addicted victims.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191384
Source
Violence Vict. 2001 Dec;16(6):655-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
M H Dufour
L. Nadeau
Author Affiliation
Certificat en Toxicomanies, Faculté de l'Education Permanente, Université de Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
Violence Vict. 2001 Dec;16(6):655-72
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Mother-Child Relations
Multivariate Analysis
Quebec
Regression Analysis
Self Concept
Social Support
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology
Abstract
The goal of this study was to determine which variables distinguish resilient victims from drug-addicted victims, who were sexually abused during their childhood--in addition, to measure the contribution of these variables to the level of distress experienced by the victims. There were two groups of 20 women interviewed. The resilient group showed no clinically significant symptoms of mental distress, and the addicted group were undergoing treatment for drug dependency. They all completed a semi-structured interview and a questionnaire regarding the type and severity of their sexual abuse, mental health status, self-esteem, locus of control, support and cognitive factors from Finkelhor's model. Both of these groups were equally and severely abused. Resilient and addicted women both received a moderate level of support. These women also reported the same sense of betrayal and powerlessness. Furthermore, both groups believe, to a large degree, that they now control what happens to them (internal locus of control). There were three distinguishing variables among the two groups, they were stigmatization, self-blame, and hazard for the locus of control. In comparison, resilient women had less self-blame for having been abused and they also felt less stigmatized than addicted women. In fact, stigmatization and self-blame account for 65% of the TSC-40 variance. These results suggest that cognitive strategies, particularly those that are linked to the interpretation of the event, may have some importance in the recovery.
PubMed ID
11863064 View in PubMed
Less detail

A Submersible, Off-Axis Holographic Microscope for Detection of Microbial Motility and Morphology in Aqueous and Icy Environments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269493
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(1):e0147700
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Christian A Lindensmith
Stephanie Rider
Manuel Bedrossian
J Kent Wallace
Eugene Serabyn
G Max Showalter
Jody W Deming
Jay L Nadeau
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(1):e0147700
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Sea ice is an analog environment for several of astrobiology's near-term targets: Mars, Europa, Enceladus, and perhaps other Jovian or Saturnian moons. Microorganisms, both eukaryotic and prokaryotic, remain active within brine channels inside the ice, making it unnecessary to penetrate through to liquid water below in order to detect life. We have developed a submersible digital holographic microscope (DHM) that is capable of resolving individual bacterial cells, and demonstrated its utility for immediately imaging samples taken directly from sea ice at several locations near Nuuk, Greenland. In all samples, the appearance and motility of eukaryotes were conclusive signs of life. The appearance of prokaryotic cells alone was not sufficient to confirm life, but when prokaryotic motility occurred, it was rapid and conclusive. Warming the samples to above-freezing temperatures or supplementing with serine increased the number of motile cells and the speed of motility; supplementing with serine also stimulated chemotaxis. These results show that DHM is a useful technique for detection of active organisms in extreme environments, and that motility may be used as a biosignature in the liquid brines that persist in ice. These findings have important implications for the design of missions to icy environments and suggest ways in which DHM imaging may be integrated with chemical life-detection suites in order to create more conclusive life detection packages.
PubMed ID
26812683 View in PubMed
Less detail

[The project for a federal law on driving while in a state of intoxication: an added protection for citizens?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238094
Source
Can J Public Health. 1985 Nov-Dec;76(6):404-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
L. Nadeau
A. Poupart
Source
Can J Public Health. 1985 Nov-Dec;76(6):404-6
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholic Intoxication
Automobile Driving
Canada
Humans
Legislation as Topic
PubMed ID
4092183 View in PubMed
Less detail

The validity of the CAGE scale to screen for heavy drinking and drinking problems in a general population survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200300
Source
Addiction. 1999 May;94(5):715-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
J. Bisson
L. Nadeau
A. Demers
Author Affiliation
Université de Montréal, Health and Prevention Social Research Group (GRASP), Canada.
Source
Addiction. 1999 May;94(5):715-22
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcoholism - diagnosis
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - standards
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires - standards
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
The CAGE scale is a short test developed in the 1970s to screen for alcoholism or covert drinking problems. The reliability and validity of the scale has been demonstrated in the majority of studies conducted in clinical settings, but the validity of the scale in general population surveys has not yet been shown conclusively.
The goal of this study was to assess the criterion validity of the CAGE scale in a general population survey.
Data from a large general health survey conducted in 1992 in the province of Quebec (Canada) (N = 23,564) were used to define various measures of heavy drinking and drinking problems and to calculate, for male and female drinkers separately, standard measures of sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value at different cutoff scores on the CAGE.
With respect to both male and female drinkers, with all operational definitions of heavy drinking and useful cutoff scores on the CAGE, the scale was shown to be unable to discriminate between heavy drinkers and non-heavy drinkers. Prevalence of drinking problems among CAGE positive drinkers was also very low.
These results do not support the use of the CAGE as a screening tool for heavy drinking and drinking problems in a general population survey or as a tool to estimate the prevalence of drinking problems in the population.
PubMed ID
10563036 View in PubMed
Less detail