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10 records – page 1 of 1.

Aging-dependent depression in the kinetics of force development in rat skinned myocardium.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46273
Source
Am J Physiol. 1999 May;276(5 Pt 2):H1511-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
D P Fitzsimons
J R Patel
R L Moss
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA. fitzsimons@physiology.wisc.edu
Source
Am J Physiol. 1999 May;276(5 Pt 2):H1511-9
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetic Acids - pharmacology
Aging - physiology
Animals
Calcium Chloride - pharmacology
Chelating Agents - pharmacology
Contractile Proteins - analysis
Ethylenediamines - pharmacology
Heart Ventricles - chemistry - cytology - physiology
Kinetics
Male
Muscle Fibers - drug effects - physiology
Myocardial Contraction - drug effects - physiology
Myocardium - chemistry - cytology - metabolism
Myosin Heavy Chains - metabolism
Organ Culture Techniques
Organ Size
Photochemistry
Rats
Rats, Inbred F344
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
Normal aging of the rodent heart results in prominent prolongation of the twitch. We tested the hypothesis that increased expression of beta-myosin heavy chain (MHC), as occurs in the normal aging process in the rodent heart, contributes to the prolongation of the twitch by depressing the kinetics of cross-bridge interaction. Using 3-, 9-, 21-, and 33-mo-old male Fischer 344 x Brown Norway F1 hybrid rats, we examined both the rate of tension development (kCa) and unloaded shortening velocity in chemically skinned myocardium. Although kCa in all four age groups was dependent on the level of Ca2+ activation, both submaximal and maximal kCa were significantly slower in 9-, 21-, and 33-mo-old rats relative to 3-mo-old rats. Furthermore, unloaded shortening velocity was significantly reduced in 9-, 21-, and 33-mo-old rats compared with 3-mo-old rats. Collectively, these data strongly suggest that the aging-related increase in beta-MHC expression results in a progressive slowing of cross-bridge interaction kinetics in skinned myocardium, which most likely contributes to the overall aging-dependent reduction in myocardial functional capacity.
PubMed ID
10330233 View in PubMed
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Archaeological mitogenomes illuminate the historical ecology of sea otters (Enhydra lutris) and the viability of reintroduction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304013
Source
Proc Biol Sci. 2020 12 09; 287(1940):20202343
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-09-2020
Author
Hannah P Wellman
Rita M Austin
Nihan D Dagtas
Madonna L Moss
Torben C Rick
Courtney A Hofman
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403, USA.
Source
Proc Biol Sci. 2020 12 09; 287(1940):20202343
Date
12-09-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Archaeology
British Columbia
Genome, Mitochondrial
Otters
Washington
Abstract
Genetic analyses are an important contribution to wildlife reintroductions, particularly in the modern context of extirpations and ecological destruction. To address the complex historical ecology of the sea otter (Enhydra lutris) and its failed 1970s reintroduction to coastal Oregon, we compared mitochondrial genomes of pre-extirpation Oregon sea otters to extant and historical populations across the range. We sequenced, to our knowledge, the first complete ancient mitogenomes from archaeological Oregon sea otter dentine and historical sea otter dental calculus. Archaeological Oregon sea otters (n = 20) represent 10 haplotypes, which cluster with haplotypes from Alaska, Washington and British Columbia, and exhibit a clear division from California haplotypes. Our results suggest that extant northern populations are appropriate for future reintroduction efforts. This project demonstrates the feasibility of mitogenome capture and sequencing from non-human dental calculus and the diverse applications of ancient DNA analyses to pressing ecological and conservation topics and the management of at-risk/extirpated species.
PubMed ID
33259759 View in PubMed
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Contrasting Patterns for Missing Third Molars in the United States and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285379
Source
J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2017 Jun;75(6):1113-1117
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Caitlin B L Magraw
Lars Pallesen
Kevin L Moss
Elda L Fisher
Steven Offenbacher
Raymond P White
Source
J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2017 Jun;75(6):1113-1117
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Molar, Third - anatomy & histology
Nutrition Surveys
Prevalence
Sweden
United States
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to compare the prevalence of third molars from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and the Swedish survey.
This cross-sectional study involved the comparison of the only published data on third molar prevalence. The number of visible third molars in the NHANES of 2011 through 2012 were assessed in nonclinical settings by trained, calibrated dental hygienists and reported by age decade (approximately 5,000 patients). Similar data were reported for the Swedish population with data collected in clinical settings (approximately 700 patients). The primary outcome variable was the number of third molars (0 to 4); the predictor variables were age cohorts (20 to 29 through 70 to 79 yr). Outcome data were reported with descriptive statistics.
In the youngest cohort (20 to 29 yr), having no visible third molars was more likely in the US population than in the Swedish population (47 vs 2%, respectively). By 50 to 59 years, outcomes for no third molars were similar in the United States and Sweden (53 and 57%, respectively).
The presence or absence of third molars reported from the US and Swedish populations presented contrasting patterns, particularly in the younger cohorts. More comprehensive and detailed data are required in future surveys as population studies on third molars become more important for clinicians and other stakeholders.
PubMed ID
28219629 View in PubMed
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Functional cranial analysis of the human maxillary bone: I, Basal bone.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111186
Source
Angle Orthod. 1967 Jul;37(3):151-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1967

Quinolone use as a risk factor for nosocomial Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192343
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2001 Sep;22(9):572-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
C. Yip
M. Loeb
S. Salama
L. Moss
J. Olde
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2001 Sep;22(9):572-5
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
4-Quinolones
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Infective Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Case-Control Studies
Clostridium Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Clostridium difficile - isolation & purification
Cross Infection - epidemiology - microbiology
Diarrhea - epidemiology - microbiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
To determine modifiable risk factors for nosocomial Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD).
Case-control study.
300-bed tertiary-care hospital.
Hospital inpatients present during the 3-month study period.
Case-patients identified with nosocomial CDAD over the study period were compared to two sets of control patients: inpatients matched by age, gender, and date of admission; and inpatients matched by duration of hospital stay. Variables including demographic data, comorbid illnesses, antibiotic exposure, and use of gastrointestinal medications were assessed for case- and control-patients. Conditional logistic regression was performed to identify risk factors for nosocomial CDAD.
27 case-patients were identified and were compared to the two sets of controls (1:1 match for each comparison set). For the first set of controls, use of ciprofloxacin (odds ratio [OR], 5.5; 95% confidence interval [CI 95], 1.2-24.8; P=.03) was the only variable that remained significant in the multivariable model. For the second set of controls, prior exposure to cephalosporins (OR, 6.7; CI 95, 1.3-33.7; P=.02) and to ciprofloxacin (OR, 9.5; CI 95, 1.01-88.4; P=.05) were kept in the final model.
Along with cephalosporins, prior quinolone use predisposed hospitalized patients to nosocomial CDAD. Quinolones should be used judiciously in acute-care hospitals, particularly in those where CDAD is endemic.
Notes
Comment In: Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2002 Nov;23(11):637-8; author reply 63812452287
PubMed ID
11732787 View in PubMed
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Specialized sledge dogs accompanied Inuit dispersal across the North American Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307987
Source
Proc Biol Sci. 2019 12 04; 286(1916):20191929
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
12-04-2019
Author
Carly Ameen
Tatiana R Feuerborn
Sarah K Brown
Anna Linderholm
Ardern Hulme-Beaman
Ophélie Lebrasseur
Mikkel-Holger S Sinding
Zachary T Lounsberry
Audrey T Lin
Martin Appelt
Lutz Bachmann
Matthew Betts
Kate Britton
John Darwent
Rune Dietz
Merete Fredholm
Shyam Gopalakrishnan
Olga I Goriunova
Bjarne Grønnow
James Haile
Jón Hallsteinn Hallsson
Ramona Harrison
Mads Peter Heide-Jørgensen
Rick Knecht
Robert J Losey
Edouard Masson-MacLean
Thomas H McGovern
Ellen McManus-Fry
Morten Meldgaard
Åslaug Midtdal
Madonna L Moss
Iurii G Nikitin
Tatiana Nomokonova
Albína Hulda Pálsdóttir
Angela Perri
Aleksandr N Popov
Lisa Rankin
Joshua D Reuther
Mikhail Sablin
Anne Lisbeth Schmidt
Scott Shirar
Konrad Smiarowski
Christian Sonne
Mary C Stiner
Mitya Vasyukov
Catherine F West
Gro Birgit Ween
Sanne Eline Wennerberg
Øystein Wiig
James Woollett
Love Dalén
Anders J Hansen
M Thomas P Gilbert
Benjamin N Sacks
Laurent Frantz
Greger Larson
Keith Dobney
Christyann M Darwent
Allowen Evin
Author Affiliation
Department of Archaeology, University of Exeter, Exeter, Devon, UK.
Source
Proc Biol Sci. 2019 12 04; 286(1916):20191929
Date
12-04-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Alaska
Animal Distribution
Animals
Archaeology
Arctic Regions
Canada
DNA, Ancient - analysis
DNA, Mitochondrial - analysis
Dogs - anatomy & histology - genetics
Genome, Mitochondrial
Greenland
Human Migration
Phenotype
Abstract
Domestic dogs have been central to life in the North American Arctic for millennia. The ancestors of the Inuit were the first to introduce the widespread usage of dog sledge transportation technology to the Americas, but whether the Inuit adopted local Palaeo-Inuit dogs or introduced a new dog population to the region remains unknown. To test these hypotheses, we generated mitochondrial DNA and geometric morphometric data of skull and dental elements from a total of 922 North American Arctic dogs and wolves spanning over 4500 years. Our analyses revealed that dogs from Inuit sites dating from 2000 BP possess morphological and genetic signatures that distinguish them from earlier Palaeo-Inuit dogs, and identified a novel mitochondrial clade in eastern Siberia and Alaska. The genetic legacy of these Inuit dogs survives today in modern Arctic sledge dogs despite phenotypic differences between archaeological and modern Arctic dogs. Together, our data reveal that Inuit dogs derive from a secondary pre-contact migration of dogs distinct from Palaeo-Inuit dogs, and probably aided the Inuit expansion across the North American Arctic beginning around 1000 BP.
PubMed ID
31771471 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.