Skip header and navigation

Refine By

34 records – page 1 of 4.

An adaptive-management framework for optimal control of hiking near golden eagle nests in Denali National Park.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101839
Source
Conserv Biol. 2011 Apr;25(2):316-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Julien Martin
Paul L Fackler
James D Nichols
Michael C Runge
Carol L McIntyre
Bruce L Lubow
Maggie C McCluskie
Joel A Schmutz
Author Affiliation
Florida Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0485, USA. julienm@ufl.edu
Source
Conserv Biol. 2011 Apr;25(2):316-23
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods
Decision Making
Eagles
Endangered Species
Models, Theoretical
Recreation
Risk assessment
Uncertainty
Abstract
Unintended effects of recreational activities in protected areas are of growing concern. We used an adaptive-management framework to develop guidelines for optimally managing hiking activities to maintain desired levels of territory occupancy and reproductive success of Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) in Denali National Park (Alaska, U.S.A.). The management decision was to restrict human access (hikers) to particular nesting territories to reduce disturbance. The management objective was to minimize restrictions on hikers while maintaining reproductive performance of eagles above some specified level. We based our decision analysis on predictive models of site occupancy of eagles developed using a combination of expert opinion and data collected from 93 eagle territories over 20 years. The best predictive model showed that restricting human access to eagle territories had little effect on occupancy dynamics. However, when considering important sources of uncertainty in the models, including environmental stochasticity, imperfect detection of hares on which eagles prey, and model uncertainty, restricting access of territories to hikers improved eagle reproduction substantially. An adaptive management framework such as ours may help reduce uncertainty of the effects of hiking activities on Golden Eagles.
PubMed ID
21342265 View in PubMed
Less detail

An epidemiological study on increased length of stay.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103251
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1990 Feb;67(1):28-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1990
Author
L. McIntyre
Author Affiliation
Izaak Walton Killam Hospital, Dalhousie University, Faculty of Medicine, Halifax.
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1990 Feb;67(1):28-31
Date
Feb-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Diagnosis-Related Groups - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiologic Methods
Hospitals, Pediatric - utilization
Hospitals, Special - utilization
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Length of Stay - trends
Mortality
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Patient Admission - trends
Patient Discharge - trends
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
The epidemiologic triad of causation states that all illness results from a disequilibrium between host, agent and environmental factors. The "illness" investigated in this report--increased LOS--resulted from a combination of: patient factors--the increased prevalence of chronic diseases in childhood, a revolution in neonatal survival and an increase in survivorship in general for severe diseases, such as congenital anomalies and genetic diseases; agent factors--the transition from agents of infectious disease to agents of chronic disease as well as iatrogenesis; and health care environmental factors--equity issues involving the ethics of treatment, changes in medical technology and patterns of medical practice. The use of preadmission testing, increased participation by parents in the care of their children, an investigation of the appropriate venue for care of chronically ill children and the back transfer of recovering children to their home hospitals were recommended and considered by the hospital's administration and board of governors.
PubMed ID
2107108 View in PubMed
Less detail

Canadian immunization: public programs or private enterprise?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234127
Source
Bull Pan Am Health Organ. 1988;22(4):355-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
L. McIntyre
F. White
Source
Bull Pan Am Health Organ. 1988;22(4):355-63
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Immunization
Ownership
Privatization
Public Health Administration
Quality Control
Vaccines
PubMed ID
3072046 View in PubMed
Less detail

Child hunger in Canada: results of the 1994 National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196717
Source
CMAJ. 2000 Oct 17;163(8):961-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-17-2000
Author
L. McIntyre
S K Connor
J. Warren
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS. lynn.mcintyre@dal.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2000 Oct 17;163(8):961-5
Date
Oct-17-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Analysis of Variance
Canada
Child
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Ethnic Groups
Family
Health Surveys
Humans
Hunger
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Mothers
Odds Ratio
Parent-Child Relations
Poverty
Prevalence
Public Assistance
Risk factors
Single-Parent Family
Social Class
Social Welfare
Abstract
In Canada, hunger is believed to be rare. This study examined the prevalence of hunger among Canadian children and the characteristics of, and coping strategies used by, families with children experiencing hunger.
The data originated from the first wave of data collection for the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, conducted in 1994, which included 13,439 randomly selected Canadian families with children aged 11 years or less. The respondents were asked about the child's experience of hunger and consequent use of coping strategies. Sociodemographic and other risk factors for families experiencing hunger, use of food assistance programs and other coping strategies were analyzed by means of multiple logistic regression analysis.
Hunger was experienced by 1.2% (206) of the families in the survey, representing 57,000 Canadian families. Single-parent families, families relying on social assistance and off-reserve Aboriginal families were overrepresented among those experiencing hunger. Hunger coexisted with the mother's poor health and activity limitation and poor child health. Parents offset the needs of their children by depriving themselves of food.
Physicians may wish to use these demographic characteristics to identify and assist families with children potentially at risk for hunger.
Notes
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1994 Aug 1;140(3):233-438030626
Cites: Epidemiology. 1996 Sep;7(5):536-98862988
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1996 Jul-Aug;87(4):257-608870305
Cites: CMAJ. 1997 Mar 1;156(5):639-459068569
Cites: J Nutr. 1999 Mar;129(3):672-910082773
Cites: CMAJ. 1998 May 5;158(9):1143-99597965
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1999 Mar-Apr;90(2):109-1310349217
Cites: Child Dev. 1994 Apr;65(2 Spec No):296-3187516849
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1987 Jul;77(7):856-83592042
Cites: CMAJ. 1987 Sep 15;137(6):485-903308037
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1998 Mar;88(3):419-269518974
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1998 Feb;37(2):163-709473912
Cites: CMAJ. 1997 Dec 15;157(12):1655-69418648
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1997 Dec;87(12):1956-619431283
Comment In: CMAJ. 2001 May 1;164(9):1275; author reply 1275-611341131
Comment In: CMAJ. 2001 May 1;164(9):1275; author reply 1275-611341132
Comment In: CMAJ. 2000 Oct 17;163(8):985-611068570
PubMed ID
11068567 View in PubMed
Less detail

Children's feeding programs in Atlantic Canada: reducing or reproducing inequities?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201557
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 May-Jun;90(3):196-200
Publication Type
Article
Author
L. McIntyre
K. Travers
J B Dayle
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Professions, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia. Lynn.McIntyre@dal.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 May-Jun;90(3):196-200
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Focus Groups
Food Services - organization & administration
Health Services Accessibility - economics
Humans
New Brunswick
Newfoundland and Labrador
Nova Scotia
Poverty
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Stereotyping
Abstract
This study analyzed, through case studies of day-to-day observations and interviews with recipients and operators, the operations of nine children's feeding programs in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Newfoundland. We found that children's feeding programs result in the stigmatization of participants and families, despite an ideology of equality. Most programs adopt a family substitution role in the lives of children they serve and function in a way that excludes parental participation. Programs also transmit a hidden curriculum to children that teaches them how to behave and how a 'proper' family functions. We found that the professionalization of food and nutrition, a desire for an expanded client base, and dependency creation through the provision of other material goods, permit programs to exert increasing institutional control over recipients, a process we, following Illich, call the dragnet. While these programs may be meeting some nutritional needs in a few poverty-stricken children, they ultimately reproduce, rather than reduce, inequities.
PubMed ID
10401172 View in PubMed
Less detail

Circumpolar status of Arctic ptarmigan: Population dynamics and trends.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299777
Source
Ambio. 2019 May 09; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-09-2019
Author
Eva Fuglei
John-André Henden
Chris T Callahan
Olivier Gilg
Jannik Hansen
Rolf A Ims
Arkady P Isaev
Johannes Lang
Carol L McIntyre
Richard A Merizon
Oleg Y Mineev
Yuri N Mineev
Dave Mossop
Olafur K Nielsen
Erlend B Nilsen
Åshild Ønvik Pedersen
Niels Martin Schmidt
Benoît Sittler
Maria Hørnell Willebrand
Kathy Martin
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Polar Institute, Fram Centre, Postbox 6606, Langnes, 9296, Tromsø, Norway. eva.fuglei@npolar.no.
Source
Ambio. 2019 May 09; :
Date
May-09-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Rock ptarmigan (Lagopus muta) and willow ptarmigan (L. lagopus) are Arctic birds with a circumpolar distribution but there is limited knowledge about their status and trends across their circumpolar distribution. Here, we compiled information from 90 ptarmigan study sites from 7 Arctic countries, where almost half of the sites are still monitored. Rock ptarmigan showed an overall negative trend on Iceland and Greenland, while Svalbard and Newfoundland had positive trends, and no significant trends in Alaska. For willow ptarmigan, there was a negative trend in mid-Sweden and eastern Russia, while northern Fennoscandia, North America and Newfoundland had no significant trends. Both species displayed some periods with population cycles (short 3-6 years and long 9-12 years), but cyclicity changed through time for both species. We propose that simple, cost-efficient systematic surveys that capture the main feature of ptarmigan population dynamics can form the basis for citizen science efforts in order to fill knowledge gaps for the many regions that lack systematic ptarmigan monitoring programs.
PubMed ID
31073984 View in PubMed
Less detail

Circumpolar status of Arctic ptarmigan: Population dynamics and trends.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309515
Source
Ambio. 2020 Mar; 49(3):749-761
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2020
Author
Eva Fuglei
John-André Henden
Chris T Callahan
Olivier Gilg
Jannik Hansen
Rolf A Ims
Arkady P Isaev
Johannes Lang
Carol L McIntyre
Richard A Merizon
Oleg Y Mineev
Yuri N Mineev
Dave Mossop
Olafur K Nielsen
Erlend B Nilsen
Åshild Ønvik Pedersen
Niels Martin Schmidt
Benoît Sittler
Maria Hørnell Willebrand
Kathy Martin
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Polar Institute, Fram Centre, Postbox 6606, Langnes, 9296, Tromsø, Norway. eva.fuglei@npolar.no.
Source
Ambio. 2020 Mar; 49(3):749-761
Date
Mar-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Arctic Regions
Galliformes
Greenland
North America
Population Dynamics
Russia
Svalbard
Sweden
Abstract
Rock ptarmigan (Lagopus muta) and willow ptarmigan (L. lagopus) are Arctic birds with a circumpolar distribution but there is limited knowledge about their status and trends across their circumpolar distribution. Here, we compiled information from 90 ptarmigan study sites from 7 Arctic countries, where almost half of the sites are still monitored. Rock ptarmigan showed an overall negative trend on Iceland and Greenland, while Svalbard and Newfoundland had positive trends, and no significant trends in Alaska. For willow ptarmigan, there was a negative trend in mid-Sweden and eastern Russia, while northern Fennoscandia, North America and Newfoundland had no significant trends. Both species displayed some periods with population cycles (short 3-6 years and long 9-12 years), but cyclicity changed through time for both species. We propose that simple, cost-efficient systematic surveys that capture the main feature of ptarmigan population dynamics can form the basis for citizen science efforts in order to fill knowledge gaps for the many regions that lack systematic ptarmigan monitoring programs.
PubMed ID
31073984 View in PubMed
Less detail

Climate and weather have differential effects in a high latitude passerine community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303742
Source
Oecologia. 2021 Feb; 195(2):355-365
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2021
Author
Jeremy D Mizel
Joshua H Schmidt
Carol L Mcintyre
Author Affiliation
Arctic Network, U.S. National Park Service, 4175 Geist Road, Fairbanks, AK, 99709, USA. jeremy_mizel@nps.gov.
Source
Oecologia. 2021 Feb; 195(2):355-365
Date
Feb-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Climate change
Passeriformes
Seasons
Temperature
Weather
Abstract
Climatic factors act on populations at multiple timescales leading to the separation of long-term climate and shorter-term weather effects. We used passerine counts from 1995 to 2019 in subarctic Alaska (Denali National Park, USA) to assess the impacts of the prior breeding season's weather on breeding season abundance and the impacts of climate measured through shifts in elevational distribution. Weather and climate appear to have had opposing effects on the abundance of some shrub-associated species as evidenced by a positive response to nesting phase temperature over a 1-year lag and a negative response to warming-induced shifts in shrub-dominated habitats over the long term. The latter response was indicated by declines in abundance which occurred in some part through portions of these populations shifting upslope of our fixed sampling frame. Overall, the abundance of species was related to one or more of the lagged effects of weather and the effects of weather alone drove nearly twofold variation in annual abundance in most species. The effect of nesting phase temperature was a strong positive predictor at both community and individual species levels, whereas arrival phase temperature had weak support at both levels. The effects of total precipitation during the nesting phase and snowmelt timing shared mixed support at community and species levels, but generally indicated higher abundance following seasons that were drier and had earlier snowmelt. Together, our findings of opposing effects of climatic variables at different timescales have implications for understanding the mechanisms of population and distributional change in passerines in the subarctic.
PubMed ID
33439358 View in PubMed
Less detail

Correction to: Status and trends of circumpolar peregrine falcon and gyrfalcon populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307220
Source
Ambio. 2020 03; 49(3):784-785
Publication Type
Journal Article
Published Erratum
Date
03-2020
Author
Alastair Franke
Knud Falk
Kevin Hawkshaw
Skip Ambrose
David L Anderson
Peter J Bente
Travis Booms
Kurt K Burnham
Suzanne Carrière
Johan Ekenstedt
Ivan Fufachev
Sergey Ganusevich
Kenneth Johansen
Jeff A Johnson
Sergey Kharitonov
Pertti Koskimies
Olga Kulikova
Peter Lindberg
Berth-Ove Lindström
William G Mattox
Carol L McIntyre
Svetlana Mechnikova
Dave Mossop
Søren Møller
Ólafur K Nielsen
Tuomo Ollila
Arve Østlyngen
Ivan Pokrovsky
Kim Poole
Marco Restani
Bryce W Robinson
Robert Rosenfield
Aleksandr Sokolov
Vasiliy Sokolov
Ted Swem
Katrin Vorkamp
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, CW 405, Biological Sciences Bldg., Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E9, Canada.
Source
Ambio. 2020 03; 49(3):784-785
Date
03-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Published Erratum
Abstract
While collating contributions and comments from 36 researchers, the coordinating authors accidentally omitted Dr. Suzanne Carrière from the list of contributing co-authors. Dr. Carrière's data are described in Tables 1 and 3, Figure 2 and several places in the narrative.The new author list is thus updated in this article.
Notes
ErratumFor: Ambio. 2020 Mar;49(3):762-783 PMID 31858488
PubMed ID
31965558 View in PubMed
Less detail

The dragnet of children's feeding programs in Atlantic Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196304
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2000 Dec;51(12):1783-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
J B Dayle
L. McIntyre
K D Raine-Travers
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, Saint Mary's University, Halifiax, Nova Scotia, Canada. jutta.dayle@dal.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2000 Dec;51(12):1783-93
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Food Services - organization & administration
Humans
Hunger
Poverty
Abstract
Ivan Illich's 1976 prediction that medical dragnets will continue was correct. Now quasi-health dragnets are being established ostensibly to feed children perceived to be hungry. Our qualitative, multi-site case study found that programs justify their expansion to non-target group children as a means of reducing stigmatization, while reaching only an estimated one-third of targeted children. The dragnet continues as new services are added and franchising is proposed while the purpose of the program feeding healthy foods to children ultimately succumbs to drives for efficiency and the desire to maintain the program itself. In this field of social power relations, children become commodified through dialectical interplays among fundamental needs, manipulated needs, benevolence, and domination.
PubMed ID
11128266 View in PubMed
Less detail

34 records – page 1 of 4.