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Characterisation of invasive group B streptococci from adults in Denmark 1999 to 2004.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96223
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2010 Jul 31;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-31-2010
Author
L. Lambertsen
K. Ekelund
I C Skovsted
A. Liboriussen
H-C Slotved
Author Affiliation
Neisseria and Streptococci Reference, Department of Bacteriology, Mycology and Parasitology, Division of Microbiology and Diagnostics, Statens Serum Institut, Artillerivej 5, 2300, Copenhagen S, Denmark, LLM@SSI.dk.
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2010 Jul 31;
Date
Jul-31-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The aim of this study was to characterise the group B streptococci (GBS) isolates causing severe invasive infections in patients >15 years of age in Denmark from 1999 to 2004. A total of 411 invasive GBS isolates were phenotypically characterised by the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) serotype and protein Calpha, Cbeta and R4. The incidence of invasive GBS disease ranged from 2.2 to 3.2 per 100,000 adults in the study period, being highest among adults over 65 years of age. Diabetes was observed in 15% of the cases, 12% had alcohol abuse and 7% had cancer. Of all isolates, 77% were CPS serotypes Ia, Ib, III or V. The surface proteins Calpha or R4 were detected as the only protein in 57% of the GBS isolates. Cbeta was detected in 12% of the isolates, but always in combination with either Calpha or both Calpha and R4. The incidence of invasive GBS infections continued to increase in Denmark from 1999 to 2004. In that period, the overall case fatality was 14%. The most prevalent CPS serotypes were serotypes III, Ia, V and Ib. The most prevalent surface protein was R4 when testing for R4, Calpha and Cbeta. There was no clear relation between the GBS phenotype and infections with fatal outcome.
PubMed ID
20676713 View in PubMed
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Morbidity, mortality and spatial distribution of meningococcal disease, 1974-2007.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151814
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2009 Nov;137(11):1631-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
M. Howitz
L. Lambertsen
J B Simonsen
J J Christensen
K. Mølbak
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2009 Nov;137(11):1631-40
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Meningitis, Meningococcal - epidemiology - mortality
Middle Aged
Neisseria meningitidis - classification
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Sepsis - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Serotyping
Young Adult
Abstract
To identify determinants for mortality and sequelae and to analyse the spatial distribution of meningococcal disease, we linked four national Danish registries. In the period 1974-2007, 5924 cases of meningococcal disease were registered. Our analysis confirms known risk factors for a fatal meningococcal disease outcome, i.e. septicaemia and high age (>50 years). The overall case-fatality rate was 7.6%; two phenotypes were found to be associated with increased risk of death; C:2a:P1.2,5 and B:15:P1.7,16. B:15:P1.7,16 was also associated with excess risk of perceptive hearing loss. The incidence rates of meningococcal disease were comparable between densely and less densely populated areas, but patients living further from a hospital were at significantly higher risk of dying from the infection. To improve control of meningococcal disease, it is important to understand the epidemiology and pathogenicity of virulent 'successful clones', such as C:2a:P1.2,5 and B:15:P1.7,16, and, eventually, to develop vaccines against serogroup B.
PubMed ID
19327198 View in PubMed
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Outbreak of group A streptococcal throat infection: don't forget to ask about food.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160316
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2008 Sep;136(9):1165-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
G. Falkenhorst
J. Bagdonaite
M. Lisby
S B Madsen
L. Lambertsen
K E P Olsen
K. Mølbak
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. GFA@ssi.dk
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2008 Sep;136(9):1165-71
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Food Microbiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Pharyngitis - epidemiology - microbiology
Streptococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Streptococcus pyogenes
Abstract
We report a large foodborne outbreak due to group A streptococci (GAS), which caused acute tonsillo-pharyngitis in 200-250 patrons of a company canteen in Copenhagen, Denmark, in June 2006. A retrospective cohort study of canteen users showed that consumption of cold pasta was associated with an increased risk of illness (attack rate 68%, risk ratio 4.1, P
Notes
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PubMed ID
18005475 View in PubMed
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